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I have heard many references to "Miniland" scale. From what I have seen, this style of building mostly includes figurines that are larger than normal mini-figs.

What are some other characteristics of "Miniland" scale?

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Mini style {used in LEGO sets and by collectors, not Miniland}

Mini scale/style is typically much smaller than normal LEGO. In Mini scale/style, figures are formed with 2-3 blocks.

Mini scale/style {if I remember correctly} didn't gain popularity until recently. It's so far been popularly used in the LEGO Architecture sets, and in a few others of common landmarks.

It's also common to see three-to-five-dollar packages that contain buildable models {sold in the LEGO stores} in the Mini scale/style.

Examples of Mini sets include:

Miniland style {used by Legoland amusement parks and a few LEGO sets}

I believe that the LEGO amusement parks use something close to miniland scale. It is, however, much different than normal Mini style/scale. One notable fact is that the people have larger heads. I know this is true for the one in Billund, but I'm not sure about the one in California.

Here and here are the pages of Minilands Billund and California, respectively. The Billund miniland doesn't have its' own page, but it's on the interactive map at the link provided.

A Miniland Flickr group is here if you want to see what Miniland style/scale is.

EDIT! As Zhaph-Ben Duguid pointed out, the Legoland amusement parks are called Miniland, but do not use the Mini scale/style. They use a strange hybrid between DUPLO and LEGO Mini scale/style. It is actually not the more common Mini style/scale used in sets. I've updated this answer to reflect that.

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I'd suggest that Miniland is larger than standard LEGO - the figure's heads in the Minilands at the parks are made of a number of bricks alone - and are larger than minifig heads. –  Zhaph - Ben Duguid Oct 26 '11 at 9:10
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The Lego parks had the term Miniland first; can you cite its use outside the parks? –  Erik Olson Oct 26 '11 at 20:56
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I too would like a citation for LEGO Architecture being "miniland" - I considered it micro-scale. –  user23 Oct 26 '11 at 22:27
    
Sorry, but your edit forces me to -1. As far as I know miniland scale is what is at the parks, and your first paragraph is about micro-scale. This answer is just getting wronger over time. –  user23 Oct 27 '11 at 0:24
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thanks for making it a bit clearer, i had also heard of micro-scale but knew that it was separate from this style of building. I know about the more official "mini" style too now. –  RedRiderX Oct 27 '11 at 1:06

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