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5

I suggest calling Lego customer service (1-800-835-4386) to ask them about a bulk order. Professional "brick artists" like Nathan Sawaya buy their brick directly from Lego. The bulk prices are decent as well. For example, through the LUGbulk program, we got 2x4 bricks for about 9.6 cents each (these sell for $0.30/ea on the Pick-a-brick website). Also, here ...


4

I guess I'm too stunned (I mean, is this for real?) to answer anything remotely meaningful, although some obvious cons come to mind: you get bricks which have been used, potentially a lot, and you have no clue how or by whom (well ok they say they sanitize them in between, but still) you don't get to keep them (well maybe that's a pro given the first con). ...


3

The thing with ABS is a bit more than that simple. The general rule is that if you want to have different/better plastic you need to play with small amounts of co-polymers. 99-point-something of your plastic is the main co-polymer, but the 0-point-nothing decides about fine-tuning of properties. A bit more than 10 years ago a friend of mine was working for ...


3

Both Lego and MEGA Brands use injection-molded ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) plastic to manufacture their elements. The most obvious difference between the two manufacturing processes is that Lego elements tend to have thicker walls than Mega Blok elements. That accounts for the cheaper "feel" and less clutch power. Obviously MEGA does this to save ...


3

Look at Tetrix or Matrix. Theese building systems have more porefull motors than NXT ones. Metal blocks allow you to create strong robots. Tetrix and Matrix robots can be controlled by NXT/EV3.


3

There are several Chinese companies making DUPLO clones, many are listed in this fascinating article by Anthony Tomkins of UK LUG The Brickish Association. Communist LEGO, a review of some Chinese copies


2

As you can see from other answers, it may prove easier to try to get genuine LEGO bricks and there are numerous possibilities to do so: As mentioned in OddTodd's answer, the LUGBulk program may be an option, but you'll need to find a local LUG and convince them of the parts you need. As seen in the comments, limits may be an issue. Contacting the LEGO ...


2

In a recent document about the Pick-A-Brick cups comparisons, there was a segment that caught my eye. (bottom of page 7). Official LEGO stores also sell a $70 box of a single piece type. This isn’t something they advertise, but you can ask what they have available and they will sell it to you. It’s also called a “K2 box.” Measuring the volume of ...


2

Unfortunately, I'm not aware of specific factories that are currently tooled to make compatible bricks that you could get in touch with. I have noticed an eBay user that consistently sells Canadian made compatible basic bricks, so it might be worth contacting them to see if you could work out a deal. There are also many companies who will do custom ABS ...


2

I can't actually offer any thoughts regarding anything but actual bricks, as the first - and only - megabloks purchase I ever made only contained bricks. While my experience with megablocks is limited, I feel confident in offering this advice: Don't do it. My motivation for "playing" with Lego-style blocks at age 29 is probably pretty unique - I use them ...


2

Coko definitely does (See here: http://www.edex.com.au/coko-baby-blocks-transport-set-26-pieces.html). Not sure in which countries they are available. There is another question around about a mystery company with an umbrella/smiley/anchor logo on the studs. I've only found System-size bricks and plates from them, but the asker implied she had found ...


2

Pros: You get to try LEGO sets to see if you like them before you buy You can build LEGO sets that you might not be able to afford You don't have to find a market for sets you don't want to keep long-term You don't have to worry about lost parts, cleaning etc. because someone else takes care of those things for you You don't need to find space to store all ...


1

This sounds like something to ask the corporate offices. They may be able to arrange shipments that even the LEGO stores can not. For instance, Thomas Nielson is the VP of manufacturing at TLG http://dk.linkedin.com/in/thomasnielsen?trk=pub-pbmap If the stores can't get it to you, go to those who supply the stores. It certainly sounds like you generate ...


1

Although the logo on the "umbrella-bricks" you have are not Megablock, they are not Duplo either. Duplo always have the LEGO logo somewhere, and the studs are hollow. The hollow studs make them compatible with standard Lego bricks that are at least size 2x2, since the cylinder inside the Lego brick fits perfectly inside the hollow Duplo stud. See the ...



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