Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

If it's your own creation, you should be able to adapt your model to fit the rack you have. One tricky problem I can see is if your construction is built as most studless models are nowadays and features uneven dimensions - which means a 7 rack is indeed easier than a 8. You can of course build something around the old 1x4 rack place but it might get ...


10

To create a smooth surface with cheese slopes they must be offset by one-half plate in height. There are several techniques to do this. Here is one using the common "headlight" brick. It has the advantage of being extendable to nearly any length.


7

When weight is applied on the structure, the wheels are are creating a twisting motion that will eventually dissasemble the 1x6 beams. With the extra structural part when a load is applied there is a lot of flexing but the 1x6 beams are staying in place. Effectively, the axle is preventing the beams from rotating out of place.


7

One possible solution might be to use one of the new 1x1 round plates with open studs and a Bar with Clip


7

Why not use just two jumper plates (3794), one on the top and one on the bottom? No more additional are pieces required. You can also replace the stack of 1x1 round bricks with a single Support 1 x 1 x 6 Solid Pillar (43888) piece. The piece is used in conjunction with a large swinging vault door in the Bank & Money Transfer (3661) set. The brick ...


6

There seems to be basically two choices. You can either build a larger version than the traditional cube, or you can build something that doesn't stay together very well. There's a nice example of a small cube on Sebastians Sand's Brickshelf: While this looks like it would work, I can't imagine that it holds together through many rotations. If you are ...


6

The city people pack is probably 9348: Community Minifigure Set based on the clasic space minifig print. The numbered bags are probably from 4635: Fun With Vehicles - that's based on the colours and the lime green/"bright yellow/green" cap. I think the first 2 bags are from 6118: Wheels and Tyres. This set has the same number of the small (8x) and bigger ...


6

MEK is the way to go - it's what the Masterbuilders at the LEGOLAND parks use. I once brought a miniland sized model from London to the US in my main suitcase that had been glued with MEK and the model was fully intact when I got to the other end! As others have said, it is VERY nasty when breathed in. Do not even think about using it in confined spaces ...


6

This would be a way but other techniques may suit you as well.


5

Would this solve your problem? Depending on the direction of the input, only one axle will turn.


5

45° angles are tricky because of the dimensions of 45-45-90 triangles: The fact that the hypotenuse needs to be a multiple of radical two makes it difficult to build out of LEGO plates which are generally limited to integers or halves. The best you can do in a reasonably small amount of space is a 5 x 5 x 7.07 triangle, but that doesn't come close enough ...


5

It appears that some LEGO pieces are designed with the proportions of 45-degree right triangles in mind. For example, the 3x3 plate with one corner removed has a diagonal edge that is very close to three studs long, as can be seen in this construction: Likewise, the 8x8 corner plate has a diagonal edge that is very close to 10 studs long:


5

There are 2 ways to get it tighter. First is to use the new worm gear part: http://rebrickable.com/parts/15457/Technic-Worm-Gear-2-Axle-Holes The other is to use an axle with stop. Have the stop on the end which has the worm gear pulling it in. Not sure which end that is, so experimenting would be your best bet.


5

You could try something like this if you have Technic beams available:


4

Eurobricks forum has hundreds of official sets in LDD format here: http://www.eurobricks.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=41226&#entry727293


4

According to the BrickLink inventory, there should be three extra parts, so 9 seems a bit high. It could be a mistake from LEGO, but honestly it's more likely that you forgot them yourself. Knowing what the 6 parts are through Bricklink, I suggest you check the model once more to verify where they could go.


4

here are some additional sets that mostly use fairly standard pieces you're likely to have in a basic lego collection: Peeron Lego Instruction Sets To add to jncraton's excellent answer, here are additional sets from Peeron's Lego Instructions Archive using generic bricks: Universal Building Set (400-1) BASIC Building Set (510-1) BASIC Building Set ...


4

LEGO has released a number of large brick buckets over the years. A few of these came with instructions and ideas for models that could be built with the contents. These include lots of ideas for animals, vehicles, and structures. Here are a few examples: There are plenty of ideas available if you browse through the instructions for these sets. Here ...


4

Might not be ideal, but have you tried replacing each Crossblock 2x3 with a Crossblock 90 and a Technic Lever 2M? You lose a little bit of stability on the bottom edge with only two pin connections instead of four, but I think it'll do the job just fine. The new parts list is then: 2x Crossblock 90 Deg 2x Technic Angle Beam 4x2 90 Deg 2x Technic Lever ...


4

Hinges can work, I have used this technique before, if you sandwich the hinges between two plates you get 45 degree 'bricks' that are quite solid. In most cases, tiles and plates in the right place will keep sufficient contact with the base plate to have a stable model.


4

This is very old-school, but that's how I was doing SNOT in the early 80's: a plate, or a tile (as shown) snaps between 2 studs. I prefer tiles to plates, as I don't have studs-alignment issues, but I've used both, and both work.


4

You could introduce an arbitrarily sized gap between the red and yellow bushes in the depicted design, thus forcing the other yellow bush and the black gear against the frame. If this gap collapses due to the forces generated by the worm screw, you could place thinner, non-LEGO pieces (washers, bits of paper, etc.) between them to act as spacers. This won't ...


4

It looks like LEGO sells chain and sprockets, don't know if you'd have them lying around though. You could also try using pulleys instead. If you don't have any of the actual pulleys, take the tread off of two wheels and stretch a rubber band across, that should work too.


4

To expand on Zhaph's answer, I'm assuming that you have a fixed set of six colors, and each block is one color. If that's the case, this is a simple combination problem on top of the orientation problem. Since there are six colors and six bricks, there are 6! ways to assign those six colors to the six bricks, or 720 ways. Now, we apply this combination to ...


3

Wouldn't the one ring bind them all?


3

Here's a suggestion: Go to Brickset.com. They have scans of the boxes of almost every set every released. Many of the earlier sets (i.e., those released in the 1970s) are built almost entirely out of basic bricks, and you can usually figure out how they are built just from looking at the picture. Some links to get you started: Browse list of sets by year or ...


3

I was able to find a few elements that are able to make this connection possible. I'm guessing the designer used some type of bar-sized element which is made from a different material that is able to compress slightly more than regular ABS. For example, the softer plastic used on some minifig weapons seems to work nicely: Another option could be flexible ...


3

It's structural, but not really mandatory: The full (4 pages) instruction can be found by googling or e.g. there: http://lego.brickinstructions.com/lego_instructions/set/6847/Space_Dozer


3

It's possible the set has been discontinued. Since its release in 2010 there have been many other Brick Buckets released under the 'Bricks and More' series. For example; the 10663 Creative Chest released in 2013 is available in a similar price range but is more limited to building vehicles (no doors, windows and roof tiles for buildings). If your kids ...


3

Building a staircase out of bricks is easy enough, but uses a lot of brick pieces, as zovits already answered. If you want to achieve something faster, with fewer pieces, you could look into the spiral-staircase-piece or the regular staircase piece. The spiral staircase piece combines with some plate+pin pieces (bottom, top) and some posts. You can ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible