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10

You need: Digital Designer (Or anything that can produce Ldraw files, there are some listed in this question) Blender (Or another renderer that supports Ldraw) Blender Script (This is necessary for Blender to read you Ldraw models) Recreate your creation in Lego Digital Designer. Export as Ldraw format Import in Blender Create & render Blender scene ...


9

In addition to the other answers, the oldschool way using POV (in use before there even WAS a LEGO Digital Designer) still works. Model your creation in a LDraw compatible modelling tool of your choice (such as MLCad) but there are other choices Use one of several export programs (such as L3P) to create a POVRay compatible file Add a few commands to move ...


7

First note that this question is a possible duplicate of Do any programs exist that allow you to build your own LEGO manuals? With that, here is the answer: (optional) Create a model in LEGO digital designer or LDraw and export it as a LDraw (*.ldr) file. Install LeoCAD, and either open the model that you made in LDD/LDraw (recommended) or create your ...


7

To build your example in MLCad (LDraw), I needed to switch to "Grid Fine" to move the element into the right alignment: A couple of techniques to note when doing this when you finish with the SNOT modeling: Set the grid back to coarse so that subsequent pieces are back on the grid. Select a non-SNOT element (in this case the 2x3 or 2x2 plate) before ...


6

The LXFML file is an XML document, and there's an XSD document that you can use to validate any LXFML file, along with a textual description of the tags on the LUGNet forums supplied by the LDD Team a few years ago: LXF files - info and XML schema The key parts of the LXFML you're going to be interested in start with the <Scene> element, which ...


5

Depends on your tolerance. :) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lego says: "The machines that make Lego bricks have tolerances as small as 10 micrometres." For me, 3D printing resolution would need to be pretty close to that.


5

Almost certainly no, but with some caveats: The LeoCAD parts library is based on the LDraw parts library, which has a Legal Agreement here. The vast majority (and I would assume the entire subset used by LeoCAD) are covered under the Creative Commons Attribution License 2.0: You are free: to Share — to copy, distribute and transmit the work to Remix — ...


4

LDview can directly export LDraw files to .STL. But the problem is that the mesh obtained may not be suitable for 3D printing, many of LDraw parts are not "watertight", or contain surfaces inside the part volume (eg. suds are simply lain on flat top surface).


3

Both, often in the same file. If you take a look at the .ldr file format specification you can see that each file is made up of an number of different types of "line", one of which is a Subfile Reference where you can specify the colour, position, rotation and scale of the model. Other lines can then be added to describe Lines, Triangles, Quadrilaterals ...


3

(fair warning: I work for a 3D printer company [Type A Machines]) I thought this cross-posting up on the RepRap forum would be useful here: http://forums.reprap.org/read.php?1,114024,114024 Summarizing that post: It is possible to 3D print lego-compatible parts on desktop 3D printers, but with caveats: The fit will likely never be as tight as real legos. ...


3

You can't directly export from MLCad to the .STL format that the Makerbots require, but there are workflows you could probably set up. MLCad doesn't really have many export options, so you're better off using something like LeoCAD which can read .ldr files from MLCad, and export as other formats. Using LeoCAD, add the part you want to print to the scene. ...


2

Let me suggest Autodesk 3ds Max software or Autodesk Maya software for achieving this. You can find free bricks and models meshes right here. Additional information on lego visualization can be found on Okino's website. Here is the example of a rendered still. Doing a manual simply involve making parts of the model visible/invisible and positioning the ...


2

Here's a method you'll be able to use with the latest stable version of Blender, without any extra plugins or addons. Build your model in LEGO Digital Designer and export as an LDraw file. Import into LeoCAD, then export as a .obj file. Import into Blender with the built-in .obj importer. You can then setup the scene how you want. Also, if you're just ...


2

According to WikiPedia: The moulds are permitted a tolerance of up to two micrometres, to ensure the bricks remain connected. But, as I noted in a comment, that is in an industrial environment, where great care is taken to ensure that not just a one-off piece is right, but that the entire batch of pieces is right. They probably take a six sigma ...


1

Recently I met with TeamSim. Its possibilities are impressing: you can make own robot via LDD and export it to the program you cam make own mat (FLL, WRO, sumo mats are already available) you can program a robot via NXT-G I have no chance to investigate this program in detail, but I think it's what you want.


1

For a general introduction to Lego characters (humanoid figures) modeled directly in Blender you might like to view http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jWfS82EOa4A&list=EC3F4C5FF0451A92D9 which is a tutorial on modeling a Lego man. I have just begun to analyse this tutorial to see if I can make an expanded PDF version that will incorporate the correct ...



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