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18

All new magnet sets introduced by LEGO will have the figures glued, as will any re-makes of existing sets. History In 2009 LEGO started producing sets of minifigures standing on magnetic bricks. At that time, the figures were removable, although some felt that they were of lower quality than the figs in regular LEGO sets. In early 2011, however, LEGO ...


16

For drying, I've used a salad spinner to remove the excess moisture:


16

LEGO recommend using a mild detergent in water to clean your bricks, or a mild bleach: We recommend that you clean or wash your LEGO parts only by hand at max. 40°C or 104 degrees (F) Fahrenheit. Higher temperatures may affect the quality of the LEGO parts. You can add a mild detergent to the water, followed by rinsing with clear water. Please don't put ...


16

When cleaning dust from scale models, sculptures, figurines or LEGO models I use an artist 'Fan' brush. This is the best method I've found to clean dust rapidly without damaging models. The fan brush's long hairs combined with the thin spread enables you to dust 'any shapes and surfaces without risk of damage. For example, it would clean a LEGO antenna ...


15

The boiling temperature of water is 212 Fahrenheit (100 Celsius). The melting point of ABS plastic (the material LEGO is made of) is 176 Fahrenheit (80 Celsius). Therefore LEGO should NEVER be put in water that reaches boiling point or anywhere close to it. If you want to clean your LEGO, the best way is to just put it in a tub with luke-warm water and a ...


14

Have you tried one of the smaller portable vacuum cleaners? I've had a few of the battery operated "Keyboard Cleaner" type of thing, which usually come with a brush nozzle and work quite well. Unlike firing compressed air and scattering dust/crumbs/contaminants everywhere, they are designed to catch most of it. Faster than doing it by hand with a tooth ...


13

I actually have somewhere a special Lego picking up device. It has two wheels on the sides and when you slide it across the floor, these turn an attachment at the front. The attachement is basically like the thing on the side of a paddle boat, but taking up the whole width of the front, and it throws the lego pieces into the back of the device as it turns. ...


13

LEGO does not recommend using a dishwasher to clean your bricks: We recommend that you clean or wash your LEGO parts only by hand at max. 40°C or 104 degrees (F) Fahrenheit. Higher temperatures may affect the quality of the LEGO parts. You can add a mild detergent to the water, followed by rinsing with clear water. Please don't put your bricks in the ...


12

The LEGO company switched to ABS in 1963, bricks produced before that have a markedly different quality. However, if your sets are from around 1980, they should use ABS already and there should be no reason that the plastic is different. Other possible explanations would be bad storage conditions (too warm, direct sunlight, maybe), or the fat that the set ...


11

When I first got my kids some Lego I did it by bulk buying 25 kilo bags of used bricks off the Internet. Now these bricks had obviously been in outdoor sandpits, chewed by dogs, hidden under carpets - you name it. We successfully restored almost all of them by by washing them in a bath full of a Milton solution, scrubbing each one with an old toothbrush and ...


8

According to the LEGO Cutomer Service (click "Knowledge Base > How do I sanitize or wash my LEGO elements?"): We recommend that you clean or wash your LEGO parts only by hand at max. 40°C or 104 degrees (F) Fahrenheit. Higher temperatures may affect the quality of the LEGO parts. You can add a mild detergent to the water, followed by rinsing with clear ...


8

A dustpan & brush will do a good job: Just make sure you don't pick up too much dust with the bricks!


8

I know the sheet-on-the-carpet idea has been mentionned already, but why not go for a full LEGO solution? And if you want another pure LEGO solution, I give you… the Brick-O-Dile!


8

best way i found so far is simply using a plastic-toothpick (wooden ones should also do the job). just get the muck out as good as possible and then wash the bricks again the remove the rest. if the muck is too hard for a toothpick, use a metal needle or a very thin screwdriver - but only do this if you can't avoid because you might be scratching/damaging ...


8

Compressed air, commonly used for electronic equipment. Sold in cans at office and electronic stores, used to blow away dust and other small particles away. A paint brush is cheaper but can clear dust from a more localised area. It helps to have a brand new brush that has never been used. I use compressed air and paint brushes interchangeably when taking ...


8

A very, very low-heat iron should be fine, although you will have to bear in mind that some of the sets of sails have stickers on. I would advise either going around the stickers (the heat could cause them to melt or peel off) or ironing the back of the sail. I guess the material for the sail is the same as the part from 6091 - King Leo's Castle - which has ...


8

It appears from the photo that there may be some "blooming" where the axles have changed color? You say you rinsed them, but I wonder if you noticed whether the axles felt oily or sticky at all beforehand? This would be consistent with the kind of deterioration that is common with Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC), a kind of plastic that was once common in toy ...


7

The best idea is just using prevention: Put a big white cloth on the floor, and when you want to clean up, put the corners together and collect the parts from the middle.


7

I've successfully used a paint brush to clean my dust-covered MOCs.


7

Some of it may be your own perception changing, such as a room you remember being big when you were a kid, but which you find small as an adult. So when you perceive bricks as being softer, it could actually be that they aren't, but that your perception changed. (If you were to walk barefoot on LEGO bricks for one hour per day, your feet would eventually ...


6

I suggest to let them soak in water for a long period of time (2 days) before trying to clean them. The water will not affect the Lego plastic but some other elements (especial dirt and food) will soak it up. This makes it a lot easier to simply rinse out or scrub off the dirt. The plastic toothpick (like @oezi suggested) is great for very small corners. ...


6

Put them in a pillowcase and wash them in the washer on 30 degrees celsius.


6

I like to get out my Loader-Dozer (from LEGO Rock Raiders) to clean up my bricks: Obviously this is inspired from the video game, in which the same vehicle serves to remove rubble: I'm so meta like that.


6

I have used the Retr0bright method with great success for restoring yellowed bricks. Originally, this solution was hit upon by fans of retro computers wanting to restore old yellowed computer and game consoles to their original color. LEGO fans picked up on it and have had good results. The solution is essentially hydrogen peroxide with sodium percarbonate ...


6

A soft toothbrush can do a good job on an assembled model. Just make sure the bristles aren't too stiff. They could scratch the elements. It's still tedious, but easier than cotton swabs.


6

Try the cyberputty gunk that picks up dust. it's basically silly putty but it does what it says it does. I use it for random things like this all the time. Radioshack has it for $1.99 last I saw.


5

I have had good experiences when putting them into a washing bag. Stickers will usually come off. Paint differs from model, year and make. Some of my bricks from the 80'ies (such as this one) still look very new, with the original print intact.


5

That would not happen naturally. I have Technic (actually, Expert Builder, to give you an idea of how old they are) axles that are probably 25-30 years old and look like they were purchased yesterday. At times they have been stored in a hot, humid attic in New York City, reaching temperatures over 120 degrees F. What maybe happened here is some oil or other ...


5

Just put them in boiling hot water and leave them for 5 minutes then take them out, straiten the torso and it should come off. If it doesn't come off then get a knife and wobble it a bit and there will be no studs in the legs and you can take the whole body apart - I have successfully used this method.


5

I use pure Eucalyptus oil. It works wonderfully. Keep in mind that if you are using it on LEGO, it will also remove the original printing (but won't harm the plastic itself), so I wouldn't recommend it in that case. But other than that Eucalyptus oil can remove marker, paint, glue-residue, and all kinds of gunk much better and faster than products like ...



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