Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

I use pure Eucalyptus oil. It works wonderfully. Keep in mind that if you are using it on LEGO, it will also remove the original printing (but won't harm the plastic itself), so I wouldn't recommend it in that case. But other than that Eucalyptus oil can remove marker, paint, glue-residue, and all kinds of gunk much better and faster than products like ...


4

Cleaning coins reduces their value because being metal they form a natural patina with age. The patina is an indication of the coin's age, and supports its authenticity. Removing any of the patina through cleaning reduces the value because it removes this sign of its authenticity. Cleaning LEGO pieces does not affect their value in the same way it does ...


3

Background info: I recently started collecting Duplo blocks to build toys for our sugar gliders (small, exotic marsupials); I've also got some regular Lego blocks in the mix that my boyfriend's had for who knows how long. To get the most for my money (especially when it comes to avoiding figurines and random pieces that don't suit my purpose), I've been ...


2

I've been to Legoland Windsor (in the UK) on one of the days they were cleaning some of the boats, and it looked hard - all manual work, with a large toothbrush and plenty of elbow grease


2

It's very unlikely to be lead, smaller batteries don't use it. If the batteries were old rechargables they might contain cadmium (NiCd batteries). Most likely what you had was a disposable AA battery which will be an alkaline cell. As you'd guess, you can neutralise that with acid. But not a strong acid - you don't want to dissolve away the metal parts of ...


2

The yellowing that is common in some colors is caused when a fire retardant that was added to the ABS plastic breaks down under UV light. One of the elements used in the fire retardant is bromine. When the chemical degrades, bromine atoms can be freed and can make their way to the surface of the brick where they bond with an oxygen molecule (O2) and take ...


2

The retr0brite method only affects the surface of the brick and does not affect the clutch power. I have used the method on several printed bricks. I have noticed the black printing will start to fade if the bricks are left in the solution for a long time. I have not noticed that it affects other colors as much as black, but this may be because the fading ...


2

It depends very much on how you clean them, and why. Parts that were covered in mud or excrement will have lower value after that regardless of how you clean them, but I suggest it's not the cleaning that is the cause. Similarly for parts exposed to cigarette smoke or other toxic substances. If you check Bricklink, for example, many sellers of second hard ...


2

I've used a dry erase marker, over the permanent, to remove it from a white board. I don't know if that'd work on Lego or not.


1

I know it's not the most cost-effective way, but I used to use gasoline on a rag to remove a lot of markings on plastics of all kinds. It won't warp the plastic when used sparingly on a rag. The only downside is that it may "smear" the marker, depending on the kind of marker that was used.


1

Most of the answers here use various combinations of air and brushes to get rid of dust. This works fairly well; I used to dust my model airplanes with the same paintbrushes I used for painting them. I second the tiny portable vacuum cleaner too. However, my go-to option for dusting models that have been standing around too long is soapy water. I recently ...


1

I have found that laundry detergent with warm water works best. It's usually a stronger detergent than dishwashing liquid (which is commonly suggested). Either way, look for something that's as close to a pure detergent as possible - no scents, fabric softeners, dish-shiny-makers etc. I try to avoid anything that is known to change the bricks - peroxides are ...


1

For difficult, stubborn dirt and er, stuff, in corners and hard to reach places, I use wooden tooth picks. They're also particularly good for getting dirt from between the letters of the Lego logo on studs. Also, cocktail sticks.


1

I would not recommend using a dishwasher. I have seen terribly worn bricks with a very ugly, dull surface as a result of multiple dishwasher procedures. Sometimes you can notice that a dishwasher etches even a glass surface. The damage could probably be caused by a combination of the water properties, detergent being used, and temperature.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible