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22

People with 3d printers have made their own LEGO bricks. The plastic used is ABS. Blog post Interestingly, 3d printers can be constructed out of LEGO parts - you could have it self replicating! Of course, you would need a very expensive and high quality printer to make good pieces. Cheaper ones can only make hollow bottoms and the banding from ...


17

You can do that with scale model water decals. You can buy that in blank sheets and print out your designs with an inkjet printer. You can also use products that help those water decals set (adhere) and conform to the surface deformation and use scale model varnishes to seal it in place. Shopping list: Water decal sheets Setting solution (sticks better) ...


16

Big Ben Bricks sells some custom LEGO-compatible elements, mostly train wheels. Since they produce sizes which the LEGO company doesn't, they have some customer, but the production cost is usually quite high for such a quality. BrickForge does sell custom elements too, and so do BrickArms. Usually, custom element producer will focus on elements the LEGO ...


16

I don't think that spray paint would be very durable. Even if you used a primer specifically designed for plastic the paint would scratch off fairly easily. Also, spray paint would add a noticeable amount of thickness to the brick and could interfere when trying to mate the brick up with others.


14

Brasso (yes, the metal polish) works wonders as far as removing print. Yes, you still have to rub it, but it won't damage or scratch the surface and it works fast. Just use a soft cloth, pour some Brasso on it and wipe away the print. Also, pure Eucalyptus Oil works really well. It requires a bit of soaking, but it will remove the print wonderfully and it ...


13

The problem is that bricks are coloured throughout, not just surface coloured, which means any paint you add will wear off. My guidance is to source a brick in the colour you need and replace it.


11

According to Auto Body Repair by Duffy and Sharff, the best solution for any interior or exterior (non-flexible) ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, the plastic LEGO elements are made of) component is to apply a standard lacquer based system, no primer.


11

If it's for a display model (static on a shelf) you could use scale model paint and varnish. Matching the original color will be hard, so don't expect perfection. On the other hand, if your looking to 'play' with that piece afterward, I don't think any paint method can resist that abuse. like mentioned by Rory Alsop you're better off finding the real ...


10

The easiest way to do this is to score the baseplate with a straightedge and knife. Once you've made a deep enough cut, you should be able to bend and break the plate where you've scored it. You may want to sand the edge to clean it up a bit. There's a more detailed set of instructions in this Instructable.


9

The way that Lego does it is with whats called a "pad printer". Brickprinter.com also uses a pad printer. It takes a lot of skill to get the printing to work correctly. You have to have the proper amount of solvent in the ink to get it to adhere to the part and not smudge. The solvent also softens the ABS plastic so that the ink actually embeds into the ...


8

The glue is one obvious thing, and I think they recently also experimented with a new sort of transparent stuff to paint the finished models with so that they would be more resistant to direct sunlight. I don't think they'll paint bricks to change their colour, though. However, In the same category of things any respectable AFOL would never do, I'm fairly ...


8

LEGOLAND builders appear to be quite "rules free" in their use of parts, as long as the final model looks as though it is made of LEGO. Not exactly a "part modification", but LEGOLAND builders have sometimes had access to parts in colors not available to regular builders. The builders often add lights or other mechanisms to their constructions. The moving ...


8

In general the colors would take on a yellowish hue. The colors that are most damaged by sunlight are white and blue. White can turn all the way to dark tan, and blue will take on an ugly yellowish color. On the other hand red would fade into pink. But again; the sun does damage the bricks. They will turn brittle and somewhat powdery, like all plastics do. ...


8

Well, I opened it up without much success, and took some pictures of the process: At first I tried pushing/prying the light grey tabs away from the dark gray "bottom", but those weren't budging So plan B: wedge it apart: It was opening, but I was also distorting the plastic in the process - perhaps if I had a hot air station or something, I could have ...


7

It's Lego blasphemy to change the color of the bricks (or to modify them using, say, a dremmel) but that said I would use the spray paint that is made for plastic. Of course, whenever I go to Lowes the color selection is limited so you may not find the color you need.


7

Yes, is it definitly possible. However, as this page states: Producing physical prints from our provided 3D models prompts certain fabrication considerations. According to Wikipedia, the precision of Lego pieces is less than 10 microns. As of early 2012, however, standard Makerbot printers have an XY resolution of 100 microns (0.1mm) and a default layer ...


7

Depends on your tolerance. :) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lego says: "The machines that make Lego bricks have tolerances as small as 10 micrometres." For me, 3D printing resolution would need to be pretty close to that.


6

Online I would recommend BrickEngraver I think your best bet would be to find a local trophy shop, most will engrave items. Take them some LEGO to test and they should be able to provide what you need without the need to pay shipping.


6

The 1979–1989 Fabuland animals figures have a human body slightly larger than a minifigure, the head, arms and legs move but cannot be removed. The figures are no longer produced but remain quite popular amongst AFOL's. They can still be purchased on sites like Bricklink.


6

I would use the head piece from a Gamorrean Guard. This piece can be found in the following sets: 4476 Jabba's Prize 6210 Jabba's Sail Barge 9516 Jabba's Palace


5

Maybe a search for custom box design although I doubt they'd make small volumes either. It would look very professional, though. What I've seen fans selling custom kits doing is using simple white boxes with stickers on them. Usually the buyers are more interested in the contents anyway. Sticker printing shouldn't be a problem (as it's going to be put on ...


5

I started with something based around the tracks that came with the original LEGO Mindstorm's kit: 680 Technic Tread: I then build a rather more bulky than I'd have liked set of beams around it - I think if I'd have really dug out my Technic elements I'd have had more success making it look closer to the mattracks options: Here's the very bulky rear - ...


5

At office/stationary stores such as Office Max or Staples you can get printer friendly sticker paper. The 'AVERY STICKER PROJECT PAPER' comes in clear or white. You can shop around for different finishes. Some are more paper like and other are more like plastic. From experience this is only good for flat surfaces. To ensure maximum adherence, I recommend ...


5

Pure eucalyptus oil works excellent, won't damage your minifigs, (and it smells good too!). You can get it in small bottles at health-food stores, pharmacies, and Asian stores. You don't need much, so a small bottle can last you a long time. Just pour a little of the oil on a piece of cotton or soft towel, and rub over the printed area you want to remove. ...


4

According to WikiPedia: The moulds are permitted a tolerance of up to two micrometres, to ensure the bricks remain connected. But, as I noted in a comment, that is in an industrial environment, where great care is taken to ensure that not just a one-off piece is right, but that the entire batch of pieces is right. They probably take a six sigma ...


4

In my understanding of the question, you want to take an existing LEGO velociraptor and repaint it, but you are afraid that doing a custom paint job will rub off quickly. There is no easy solution for this, but here are a few tips: You could send an email to the guys at minifigs.me and see if they would be willing to help you with this, either as a one-...


4

First of all, if you are serious about this business, go to an IP lawyer who can take this up for you and give you a much more confident answer than the bunch of us LEGO fans can :) Second, isn't it funny that all links I try to get to LEGO's FUP result in a 503 Service not available error? Third, you might want to read the perspective in this thread on ...


3

Your friend can get Queen Amidala at several shops based in Europe. Here are all the listings with the country of the shop: http://www.bricklink.com/catalogPG.asp?M=sw387. It might be also worth checking the eBay listings specific for their country. As far as Mario, LEGO never made an official one, however this UK based store does carry some: http://www....


3

The minifigures and the guns will be custom made. There are a number of sites that offer custom printed minifigs in military uniforms, and Brick Arms is a good place to start if you're after specific weapons. The LEGO Group have a policy of not creating "realistic" weapons, although both fantasy and futuristic are acceptable.


3

The size won't matter in Paint, what will matter is the resolution of your printer. For example, if you want to print 1 inch by 1 inch, and your printer is 800 DPI, then you need an 800x800 image.



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