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No, Lego does not sell custom printed bricks in small quantities (I suspect if you wanted thousands of the same design it would be a different story). To get your search to work you need to use the advanced features, specifically by removing results that contain 3D: print on ABS plastic -3D That turns up mostly links on screen printing, which would be ...


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According to WikiPedia: The moulds are permitted a tolerance of up to two micrometres, to ensure the bricks remain connected. But, as I noted in a comment, that is in an industrial environment, where great care is taken to ensure that not just a one-off piece is right, but that the entire batch of pieces is right. They probably take a six sigma ...


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I don't know where you got that image, but you could always try and print the brick using the dimensions shown. Using the brick (#32316) shown in your example it might be possible to produce a 3D model using the 32316.dat file that's available in the LDraw library. The next problem would be placing the brick in a model and exporting it as a file type that ...


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There are many LEGO customizers who do custom printing, however please note that all printing makes sense only if hundreds of the same design are requested. Otherwise there is quite a bit of work involved with designing, formatting, color-matching and aligning each print. However if you have the money and willing to pay a few hundred bucks set-up fee for ...


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LEGO once used a brominated fire retardant in its ABS plastic. UV light causes bromine pairs in the compound to split and reconnect with oxygen atoms, taking on the brownish hue of elemental bromine. Fire retardants containing bromine - known as PBDEs - are now considered toxic and many large companies have voluntarily stopped using them. The EU has banned ...



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