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29

Various people have done this - however most of the links seem to point to a [then defunct] blog by Martin Howard (Randomwraith) from 2004. A more recent, and available, post on this, using newer pieces can be seen here: LEGO Logic by Keshav Saharia Based on a lack of gears and rack and pinion elements, Keshav decided to rebuild the logic gates using ...


10

There's a YouTube video which explains how you can replace the battery in that light brick. You can also find the owner's explanation on the Eurobricks forums. Quoting from that site: What you'll need: ExoForce Light brick (obviously) A small screwdriver (or other item with a long, thin shaft) (my s'driver was 2mm (0.07 inches) thick) A ...


8

This is a big question, but here are some of the basics: The original 4.5V system worked with 3 x 1.5V C cells. It was produced between 1966 an 1986 and was used to power motors and lights in a wide variety of trains, technic, basic and even DUPLO sets. Coexisting with this system, a 12V standard for LEGO Trains was introduced in 1969 and produced until ...


7

Yes, you can use another transformer, even if it's not recommended by LEGO and you do so at your own risk (which should be minimal if you pay attention to what you do). The plug polarity is + in the center and - on the outside; it should be mentioned on the battery and the real transformer (I wish I could find the one I have to check), and the size is a ...


6

Taken from the additional notes of this bricks Bricklink catalogue entry. This item takes one CR927 3V Lithium battery. A very tiny flat screwdriver is needed to push the little clips to open up the assembly. I occasionally use the minifig-scale Axe, Crowbar or Screwdriver to pry plates, tiles and other bricks. If you don't have a ...


4

Sounds like this: Which can be found in set 8364 only. It's recharged by pushing the car on a charging track piece, itself powered by batteries: . Not particularly good, but the sheer number of track parts in the set makes it interesting to buy for some people.


3

Not directly an answer, but I thought that people interested in this question would also be interested in an inspirational post... I've seen a binary calculator like this live and have since then thought on building it with lego. Ah, sweet plans...


3

The best solution is to create custom LEGO-compatible bricks that your servos (or other parts) fit into. This can be done by: modding existing bricks with knives, glue and other tools building bricks from other material (wooden LEGO, formed with Fimo/Sculpey...) building bricks with a 3D-printer (for instance see the LEGO category on thingiverse). There ...


2

My speed regulator is clearly labeled as being 9-12V AC. I have an official 12VAC transformer. I was curious about the internals of this device, so I opened it up: The circuit begins with 4 diodes in standard bridge rectifier configuration. This converts the AC input into a rippled DC voltage. The large capacitor (2200uF, 25V) then cleans up the ...


2

Depending on your rigidity requirements, I've found double-sided tape to work well. It's cheap and found in many general goods store. The servo itself can be taped and supported on all four sides and/or the bottom to many types of lego brick surfaces. You can also use double-side tape to mount a lego surface to a servo control horn. That provides nearly ...


2

Credit where it’s due, Keshav Saharia’s gates were an attempt to simplify those found here: http://www.randomwraith.com/logic.html If you look carefully Keshav's gates you'll see that they suffer from a fundamental flaw in that they can't be reset, the input rods are completely decoupled so pulling them out does nothing. RW


2

There's this project, and with a mechanism like that you have a pretty high limit on the complexity of what you can do: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYi9sJkS19Q



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