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12

The material deformation you are seeing is called ‘plasticity’. It happens when a material under stress is deformed and doesn’t return to its original shape (this would be called elasticity). In many cases (and it is the case with LEGO ABS plastic), this deformation weakens the material (as mentioned by Kramii). To fix this part you have to deform it ...


10

When your function (such as an extending crane boom) gets to one limit or the other, this clutch gear ratchets instead of binding up the motor and all the gears in between. ETA: Forgot the second question. It has appeared in many sets, most recently the Fairground Mixer.


10

You will need to decide between 3711 Technic Chain Link and 3873 Technic Chain Tread, or possibly use them together. Each link of chain is about 1 cm long and 0.8 cm wide and you can get them in packs of 108 (Chain Link Set Product Code: 2000645) The Chain Tread are wider, but seem to be available only in smaller packs, such as Set # 9938-1: ...


10

They are not compatible, the teeth are completely different. Notice that the red old gear has 9 teeth and is the same size1 as a current 24-teeth, as illustrated by below: The axle hole however is compatible, so you could have a construction using both types. 1. Actually, the distance between axles to have two of these red gears mesh is the same as the ...


9

One of these? I regularly crushed these as a child. You could try inserting something small into the hole and gently easing it open. I've had modest success with a small screwdriver. Unfortunately, the gear will be weakened following a flattening. If it is badly squashed it is very likely break - either as you try to repair it or in use. Your best bet, ...


7

These are 3 different versions one the same shape / function that fit over axle. The right one is the oldest from the 80 The left one came next The middle one came after that. To make it more confusing, lego is now back producing the right shape again What I can remember had the original one a lot of clutch power and was hard to be removed. Personal I ...


7

The first gear wheels, or cog wheels, were designed by Knud Kristiansen around 1964 or 65; the original Danish design patent was filed on March 1, 1965. Under licence by LEGO, Samsonite manufactured and sold these gears in the USA from 1965-1972, and in Canada from 1965-74. The gears had studs on the top and tubes on the bottom. They could be made turnable ...


6

In this great GBC machine built akiyuki, you can see 2 types of conveyor belts. The first one is made of the small tread links (3873). The second and third ones are made with the large tread links (57518) He provides many videos and pictures through his blog and YouTube channel.


5

Would this solve your problem? Depending on the direction of the input, only one axle will turn.


4

I would tend to recommend some options which you didn't consider yet: using bevel gears, but actually use a combination of two gear on each axle: a 12t one (the thin one, as you say), and behind it, a 20t one (there you can use a fat one, which will probably be better). Another option is to use a worm screw, which will also allow you to change the direction ...


4

There are a number of ways to do this. This is one of the easiest and earliest methods: For that design, you'll need this part (3650): You can also do something similar using a combination of bevel gears or double bevel gears:


4

It looks like LEGO sells chain and sprockets, don't know if you'd have them lying around though. You could also try using pulleys instead. If you don't have any of the actual pulleys, take the tread off of two wheels and stretch a rubber band across, that should work too.


3

The Technic Riding Cycle theme features several bikes that may be of inspiration. One particular set Moto Cross Bike (42007) uses several 3711: Technic, Link Chain parts to make a chain. Based on Bricklink prices for the last six months, 39 chain pieces (the amount shown in the set above) would cost £4.29 (Aprox. $6.91 or €1.26). Pulleys and rubber ...


3

Dropping stones onto your LEGO doesn't sound like a kind way to treat your expensive Technic parts; I imagine that small bits of stone and dirt will fall through a belt of Technic Chain Link or Technic Chain Tread , what with them being a chain rather than a belt. This will then lead to other bits of your contraption becoming polluted with abrasive gunk. ...


3

The two larger gears were produced from 1970 to 1974, while the smaller gear remained in production for three additional years. There are six sets released during that time that contained all three parts: 800 Gear Set with Motor (1970) 802 Gear Supplementary Set (1970) 803 Gear/Wheel Set (1972) 810 Gear Truck Set (1974) 811 Gear Crane Set (1974) 812 Gear ...


3

The new gears are stronger and do not slide into the holes in bricks and liftarms. If you look closely at the holes in a brick (or liftwarm) there's a shallow, wider hole forming a step. This holds (for example) the collar in the middle of Technic pins, allowing them to hold bricks close together. Unfortunately that hole is big enough for the non-teeth ...


3

I don't believe there is any significant functional difference between these parts in terms of what can be built with them. The 10928 variant is simply a reinforced version of the original. This gear is widely used, but because of its small size, it has always had problems with breaking under high torque. It looks like this new variation is attempting to ...


3

Problem solved. I had a part wrongly fitted. both parts look similar ( black gear wheel)...one(part#6012451) is smaller that other(part #4177431). back on track now. .. :-)


2

The XL motor runs at approximately 220 RPM. Therefore, the following gearbox from the ELEC 201 class LEGO Design module from Rice should be sufficient:


2

I don't think it's really possible to salvage it, as others said, you'll only weaken it more. Even if you can place it on an axle, there's a good chance it will break under stress. But replacement should be very easy to find, and don't forget you could also contact the LEGO customer service for that. It sounds a bit overkill, but they will usually happily ...


1

Do I have to worry about breaking any gears due to excessive torque? LEGO Gears are one of the strongest LEGO components. When you apply great amounts of torque, they may slip or grind, but never break. Do I have to worry about gears slipping (skipping teeth) due to high torque? If you apply high amounts of torque, your gears will slip. This ...


1

Here's what I did: First I tried a screwdriver and awl, but couldn't get it to work. What did work was pinching it with pliers to open the hole, and then sliding in a rod. The piece is intact, but very flexible now. It is very deformed, but becomes uniform when attached to an axle. I'm going to leave it attached for a while to see if it evens it out more. ...



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