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28

The LEGO Group have recently started using solvents to "weld" elements together (notably the Minifigure legs to the magnet blocks), which are fairly heavily controlled in pure forms in most countries under drug legislation. I have discovered that LEGO is not using glue at all, but a solvent, that actually loosens the surface of the ABS plastic and allows ...


19

Although it can be done (I will share below), I would sincerely discoure you from gluing your LEGO sets. You will very much regret it later. Here are the reasons why: LEGO is meant to be a building toy - put together and taken apart many times. Once you glue a set it completely looses its usefulness and becomes nothing but another item to take up the shelf ...


14

To summarize from the thread that Major Stackings linked, sounds like Acetone is the best general solution, as it melts the pieces together until they are permanently bonded together as one bit of plastic. You only need acetone, no need for other products or ABS chips. Just brush acetone on both pieces, join them and wait 5 minutes. You will find ...


9

Such structures in LEGOland parks are usually reinforced with a metallic structure hidden within the model. And they use glue. No wonder LEGO sold them away. Some fans do use similar tricks, I've seen some make trees by embedding a wooden skewer in a trunk of 1x1 round bricks. Without that, the tree would collapse too often, and that's not even a large ...


6

In most cases they would be reused in other parks, donated to LEGO retail stores, auctioned for charity or hidden away from park visitors. As a last resort, LEGO models can and will be recycled to create new bricks. The LEGO auction site, Bricklink has a fairly hidden place to trade glued models and retail displays.


6

MEK is the way to go - it's what the Masterbuilders at the LEGOLAND parks use. I once brought a miniland sized model from London to the US in my main suitcase that had been glued with MEK and the model was fully intact when I got to the other end! As others have said, it is VERY nasty when breathed in. Do not even think about using it in confined spaces ...


5

My Son and I were at the Legoland Discovery Center in Grapevine, TX yesterday. We spoke with a LEGO® Certified Master Builder. We asked him and he says that LEGO® uses MEK to permanently adhere their large Lego sets together (lifesize etc). We just finished putting together the Volkswagen T1 Camper Van. It is notorious for the roof coming apart, as is ...


5

I use a small bottle of Gorilla super glue for my lego parts. It only squirts a tiny amount to be sure super glue doesn't get all over your parts, and also dries at a mid-range pace. I use it a lot to glue my Tiny Tactical parts to the guns after they come in the mail (which are insanely small parts) and the glue work like a charm.


5

Recently had to glue a lot of LEGO together for work. Acetone was too time consuming and did not offer a solid bond. Cyanoacrylate-based hobby glues with thick viscosity seemed the most effective. The only problem was, when immersed in water the clear LEGO windows fogged up. (No solution to that so far.) Zap a Gap hobby glue offered best results. ABS ...


3

Tough job. You can try using some nail polish remover to try to start breaking down the glue. From Removing Super Glue, which they give for advice for people that accidentally glue their fingers together, this procedure might also work for the bricks. ...even though Super Glue is incredibly strong, it has one weakness: acetone. Acetone is often ...


2

I use Kragle for putting together the Lego kits, but not any of the removeable pieces or the lego figures. I use a medium viscosity kind of Cyanoacrylate hobby glue. Just have to be careful to not get it on your fingers and your eyes.


2

Unfortunately older stickers are difficult to remove and reapply because the sticky part of the paper tend to rip off and leave a residue on the LEGO element itself. But the fact of the matter is that applying that taking off and re-applying even a new sticker is a challenge and it will almost always be visibly damaged at least a little bit. Your best bet ...


2

A better way to preserve LEGO is to put it in some sort of display case. It maintains the value and keeps the dust off.


2

We tried all kinds. Solvents just didn't cut it and only made the bricks stick tighter. The best we found is actually found at the hardware store in the plumbing aisle. Oatey all purpose cement is the best we found so far. It contains all the above solvents including MEK (which by the way is either a carcinogen or causes brain damage when absorbed into ...


2

MEK is significantly more aggressive than acetone. It shouldn't be used in a poorly ventilated area over a prolonged period. Any of these suggestions should work, but choose carefully according to your working conditions.


1

Well, maybe you could try using a nail in between the bricks. I personally have never glued legos together, so I am just giving an idea. Odd, right? Good Luck!


1

I've had some good luck using the Gel Super Glue. It's really controlled, and doesn't dry to fast.


1

For building anything of normal Lego size, the bricks generally stick together nicely if you overlap your bricks during construction. If you are making something of great size, walls of 2 or 4 dots using an overlapping pattern will produce something quite strong. Because of the shape of Legos, they are weakest when pulled from the bottom. They are designed ...



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