Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

This set is 6848 Strategic Pursuer. Instruction scans are available on Peeron.


7

The city people pack is probably 9348: Community Minifigure Set based on the clasic space minifig print. The numbered bags are probably from 4635: Fun With Vehicles - that's based on the colours and the lime green/"bright yellow/green" cap. I think the first 2 bags are from 6118: Wheels and Tyres. This set has the same number of the small (8x) and bigger ...


6

Yes, there is LXFML - which is if you like an "offical" XML format for LEGO models - in that it's produced and maintained by The LEGO Group. The .LXF format used by LEGO Digital Designer is a compressed archive containing a thumbnail in .png format and a model definition file in LFXML. As I noted in the answer to that question, the LDD team have shared ...


6

After emailing back and forth with LEGO, I think I have an acceptable answer: Example: BI 3005/48 - 7594 V 110 2/2 - Download size: 5.94 Mb ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Stands for Building Instructions A number for internal usage by different LEGO teams. You'll see that many different ...


5

The models included in AIOI as mentionned by HaydenStudios is also available as separate download There is also a huge collection of LDraw models of official sets available on Eurobricks forum


4

There are a number of ways to start figuring it out, my method is as follows: Try and identify some of the following: Unique pieces Unique minifigs Stickers on pieces Unique logos Color schemes or unique colors The minifigs, stickers and colors are usually enough at least point you to the right theme category (ie space, pirates, castle, city, star wars, ...


4

I think the piece you're referring to is Dinosaur Tail / Neck Middle Section with Pin.


3

As Zhaph - Ben Duguid said, there is the .LXFML format which is basically an XML document detailing a LEGO model. Another format you might find of use if the .ldr format. .ldr files are used in various LEGO virtual building programs that make up what's called the LDraw system of tools. As an example of the .ldr format, this: Can be generated by pasting ...


3

Mσᶎ' comment has dealt with the technical reasons quite eloquently, and I'd guess Mσᶎ' analysis is likely correct. However, I suggest that we can dig a little deeper to guess why the process hasn't been fixed. Disclaimer: the following is pure speculation. I don't work for TLG (I wish!) and have no special knowledge or insight into the company or its ...


3

Beams, axles, panels, and axles connectors usually have numbers next to them, to uniquely identifies the piece: for beams and axles, the number is the length (length in number of holes) for panels, it identifies the panel (and the panel mold contains the same number) for axle connectors, it identifies the angle (again, the same number is part of the mold, ...


3

These numbers indicate the length of the beam or axle shown. For a beam, this number is the number of holes it has. For an axle you have to hold it next to a beam and than count the number of holes.


2

I just built the bridge yesterday. I didn't have all the parts so had to be creative at some points. I'll improve some joints once I picked up more of my Lego at my dads' place. Very funny project! Pictures:


1

The book you're looking for is the "Expert Builder Idea Book (8888)". The complete book is available on Peeron.


1

One very good way is to look for numbers on pieces, especially when they are printed. A number on a Lego piece is almost always the number of the set. These often come in places where there is supposed to be a number; like license plates on cars. If you have a license plate brick with a number, that's almost 100% certain to be the set that the car belongs ...


1

I remember that in the 80's black technic parts where always hard to recognize in the instructions, in those years you had to count the studs yourself. Over the years black became a little lighter in colour to a dark grey. This was also shown on one of the first pages of the instructions. This stays OK until the introduction of dark grey parts. At that ...


1

The numbered bags are probably from 4635: Fun With Vehicles - that's based on the colours and the lime green/"bright yellow/green" cap. However even with 9348 Community Minifigure Set there's still an unidentified bag of wheels...


1

I would keep it very simple with just building the organs with regular bricks. Color code each organ. I have never seen anyone do this with LEGO bricks so can't link to a picture, however I can imagine than it could be done easily. Basically you would end up with a pipe-system. ;)


1

I suggest using google to search for them. When I did that I found two threads on EuroBricks discussing this - here and here. The first thread links to a youtube video that has downloadable instructions. Note that the instructions are 19MB and the website is fairly slow.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible