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21

A 1x1x5 brick has enough leverage to remove most jumper plates. Apply pressure to the top of the brick and pull or push away from the length of the jumper plate. Even a 1x1 brick works in certain cramped places, although It doesn't provide as much leverage.


16

I reproduced the problem and got the axle out using a sculpting tool (similar to an awl). It's a sharp metal point made out of hard metal. Soft metal will actually bend (believe me I tried three tools). I insert the point in the space left by the axle groove and pried the axle out. The point of the tool is against the axle while the body of the tools is ...


13

I'll try to show how I'd do this using a 2x12 plate (or something similar). Imagine you're looking at it from the side: _n_n_n_n_n_n_n_n_n_n_n_n_ --> Pull | narrow, long plate _n_ | jumper plate _n_n_n_n_n_n_ | baseplate n = stud Just attach a plate or brick to the top of ...


11

There's the great LEGO Brick Separator that can be bought in the LEGO Online Shop: i love this thing, it's just great if you want to take care of your nails and teeth.


10

the best way i found out till now is to get them of as good as possible with your nails or a plastic-knife (i wouldn't recommend to use metal knifes or razorblades - if you do, be careful to avoid scratching the bricks surface) and then remove the remaining glue with: pure alcohol or glass cleaner cheap hairspay (spray 2-3 seconds from very close distance ...


9

Or you could use, guess what, a new brick separator: I just noticed this one appearing on BrickLink and have no idea in what set it will come out, or if it will be sold separately, or if it will work with jumpers.


6

Best to remove as much as you can by mechanical means (plastic spatula/fingernail, nothing harder unless you like scratching your bricks) then use some 'Sticky Stuff Remover' to get the sticky residue off. This stuff works on just about anything without leaving a mark, Lego is made from ABS and will not be affected by it.


5

I performed my own experiments to determine which methods work by randomly applying three stickers (which are similar to the stickers that come in LEGO sets) onto a simple brick wall. Using my finger nails to peel the stickers worked well. This is how I've always removed stickers and in my experience, I haven't had any problems doing so. Heating the ...


5

Use the new Jumper Tile 2.0 instead! Easier to remove! Comes in many1 colors2! Advanced features3! Comes in many colours4! Lighter than the old, clumsy version! Don't wait, contact your closest LEGO reseller to upgrade your collection of obsolete jumpers to new, shiny ones! 1. Three. 2. U.S. version only. 3. The same as Jumper 1.0, plus Easier removal 4. ...


4

As I've said before in another answer, I find the #92585 Crowbar is the most versatile and is especially good at removing rubber bands from the #3736 (Technic, Steering Pulley Large) and the #4185 (Technic, Wedge Belt Wheel) elements. Don't use any sharp/metallic objects like a screwdriver or a pen knife as you may scratch the brick or sever the rubber ...


4

I was able to successfully get that size band off of that pulley using this brick separator: I slid the sharp end in between the band and the pulley then worked it under the band and was able to pull the band off without damaging either part. If you don't have a brick separator handy, you can probably use a pointy minifig utensil such as a sword instead. ...


4

In most cases it's best to to pry a brick by it's length (the bricks longest side). The base of the hinge brick can be removed with a crowbar. The crowbar brick is fairly new and exists only in a few sets but I consider it to be the most versatile. There are many other minifig utensils that can be helpful in removing different types of bricks: ...


2

One option that may minimize damage to the axle would be to find a mini chuck (left) or micro chuck (right) (i.e. a very small chuck, like a pin chuck) with 4 collet prongs that stick out far enough from the nose cap and are small enough to insert between the rim of the hole and the axle: Then you could tighten it down so the 4 prongs grip the cross ...


2

A pair of needle nose pliers might just do the trick, or some sturdy tweezers - however it might leave some scratches on the axle (thus limiting the no-damaging). I assume there's another 2 axle in the the other side stopping the use of a wooden toothpick or similar pushing it through from the other end? The joiner has an inner lip, but is hollow if I ...


2

If you don't care about preserving the old sticker, remove it with your fingers or a plastic knife and then use rubbing alcohol to remove the remaining sticky bits. As other posters have noted, metal knives/razors leave the risk of scratching the plastic bricks - it all depends on the level of confidence in your knife/razor skills. I use alcohol instead of ...


1

There is/was a product called Un-Du that would soften the adhesive of stickers so that they could be removed and reused. I was able to find a few links online, so I guess it's still around. The "patented" part of the "Un-Du" product was the tool extension attached to the bottle. The important part is the liquid and that is plain heptane. I haven't ...


1

Acetone (fingernail polish remover) works quite well also, I used to use it to get rid of marker and stickers on my LEGO bricks as a kid. Definitely do not soak your bricks in it though or you will notice your brick will turn out quite rubbery when you remove it! I found that out the hard way.



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