Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

19

There are electrical multiplexers as mentioned, however there are also many types of mechanical multiplexers. The idea behind this is to use fever motors to do more. The advantage is the reduced weight and the disadvantage is the increased complexity and lower flexibility. For example, you can control both tracks with one motor. However instead of one motor ...


12

Unless you do extreme things it should be fine. All the gears insides the Train motors, Power Function motors and the NXT motors are made of Nylon while the pinion attached to the motor is made of metal. Image Source Since Nylon is much stronger than ABS plastic (normal LEGO plastic), the ABS would twist, tear or brake before damaging the nylon gears. ...


10

What could be considered a safe limit that motors can endure for an extended period of time? Their rated voltage. Motors are designed to operate at their rated voltage indefinitely, or until they wear out, whichever comes first. Exceeding this voltage means you shorten the life of the motor. Your big enemy is heat. At some point, the amount of ...


10

Mindsensors sells third-party parts that are compatible with the NXT. They sell several motor drivers and multiplexors, for use with NXT motors, RCX motors, hobbyist servo motors, or by sending commands to a PF motor remote control receiver. HiTechnic is another such company, and they likewise make a device that sends remote control signals for PF and ...


8

5300 and 10153 are from the former 9V train system and drew power from the metal tracks. They were controlled using a transformer attached to the tracks. 88002 runs on battery power from an onboard battery box. Trains with this kind of motor can run at a set speed, or can be controlled by adding IR remote controllers. Regarding compatibility, the 5300 and ...


8

There are two non-wireless ways that I know of. One of them, (which is better most likely) is to use a Mindsensors Motor Multiplexer (Motor MUX for short), which allows the use of all motor functions and splits one port into several. Note that each multiplexer requires an additional battery box, making your robot heavier and less compact. Each multiplexer ...


7

The LEGO customer service does provide replacements for defective parts, but only for parts which are still in production. Sometimes you'll need to send the broken part back to them. They don't repair the parts as such, just replace them. As for the micromotor, you're out of luck as it's not produced anymore. They might provide another motor as a ...


6

Assuming that you're asking about the engine in particular, it seems to be a large number of pneumatic engines that have been coupled together in order to supply the required torque. LEGO pneumatic engines typically consist of a pneumatic cylinder driving a crankshaft. Here's a basic picture to give you an idea: The shaft usually also controls a pneumatic ...


6

This seems pretty much bordering on the impossible, given the current state of (LEGO) engineering capabilities. What you are describing is a Von Neumann Machine and as far as I know nobody succeeded in creating one, not just in LEGO but in general. The problems you'd have to overcome: The robot must be capable to exert sufficient force to overcome the ...


5

Here's one simple way to accomplish this using just basic parts: This isn't quite a pure Technic example, but that construction is almost exactly what was used on the steam cylinders on Emerald Night: Depending on exactly what you are trying to do, there are also some specialized parts that make building decorative pistons simple. For example, here's ...


5

You can accomplish this using gear racks (3743): You just have to create some type of channel that allows the rack to slide vertically, and then set up a gear to mesh with the rack. You can do this however you like, but here's a quick example that I built to show you what I mean:


4

It looks very much like pullback of the promotional LEGO sets with ferrari an shell from 2012. They have got the set numbers 30190 to 30195 and there is an additional crew pack (30196).


4

The simplest way to get different speeds is by changing the gears. The instructions get you to build it with a 12:20 gear down in the portal axles, so the easiest way to change the speed is to flip those to get 20:12. From memory that will not work because it interferes with other parts of the model. You can fit two 16 tooth gears in there instead, giving a ...


4

What you are describing is called backdriving. I teach my students, in principle, not to backdrive the output shaft of a gearbox, motor/gearbox, or servo/gearbox unless they know what's inside of it because you can damage the unit. I use a variety of different robots in my class so what I'm explaining applies to gear drives in general. If you grasp the ...


4

The problem can be restated: 360 / 20 = 18 deg / sec = 1 deg / .056 sec One degree is the smallest increment provided by the rotation sensors. NXT-G has a timer sensor with 1/100th second resolution. In pseudo-code: Set a motorPower variable to 10 Start a timer Loop until rotationDegrees >= 360 If timeElapsed * 18 > rotationSensorDegrees ...


4

To work properly, the Forward 5 block on the NXT as well as the Move block of NXT-G require that TWO motors be connected on ports B and C. That's probably the problem you see... To test a single motor, there is the motor block.


4

From the page you linked to we can see that the NXC OnFwd method has the following parameters: void OnFwd (byte outputs, char pwr) The power or speed parameter is listed as a char type, and looking around elsewhere on the site we find the definition of the char to be: In NXC the char type is a signed 8-bit value. This type can store values from ...


4

Everybody else has pretty much said it all, but there is one more thing I can think of. The IR Link Sensor can communicate with Power Functions, RCX, and trains. So you can use three NXT motors, plus, say, two Power Functions motors. (Only the NXTs will have rotations sensors, obviously.) If you already have some PF kit, you will only need the sensor ...


4

In short, yes it's perfectly safe to run your old 9v motors from your Power Functions battery box. This excellent online reference has a lot of information on various LEGO motors. Both the old 9v train motor and the Power Functions train motor are listed. The information on the site shows that the characteristics of the two motors are very similar with the ...


4

Here is another video from Sariel which shows that it returns to center: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T_Gvuzsngg8 With the 58122c01 Remote Control Unit it returns to center if the remote is not actuated. With the 64227 IR Speed Remote Control Unit it returns to central position when the stop button is pressed.


3

Turns out the problem is that Servo motors need at least THREE wires. Two for the PWM and one for full power. I made a new connector (and I can attach a picture if anyone is interested . . . just don't have one handy right now) that had all four of the wires from the Lego brick connected to breadboarding pins and then I wired the two new wires to +9 and ...


3

The easiest solution, provided that motor is still in production, is to contact the LEGO customer service (this online form is usually the easiest way, but you can also call them), they'll usually provide a replacement without problem.


3

You need these old school 5292 puppies ;-) 2 of them. Check a motor comparison here You're gonna have to do some after-market mods but those are very powerful , I have them from the 8366 set. But as you can see in the review, there are pro's and con's on every engine. I suggest reading it in full, it's an amazing source of information and you'll learn a ...


3

Well the power cable is the main difference, as one motor was made for the short-lived 9V RC system while the other is the current PF one. However, that doesn't mean the internals are the same. From Philo 's motor comparison page, you'll see that the PF motor is better, and that fortunately the performances are much improved [over the RC one], with an ...


3

Yes it does, see http://technicbricks.blogspot.fr/2012/06/pf-servo-in-action.html


3

Try putting a Wait block after the motor block. Set it to wait for 5 seconds. I think your program just terminates after one block. Please post your program next time you have a mindstorms question.


3

You may want to contact the LEGO customer service which will usually provide a replacement motor free of charge.


3

It seems encased. You can try to open it up, expect a short happened internally. Your best bet is to probably buy a new one. at 10$, it isn't so bad don`t you think?


3

There are a number of ways to do this. This is one of the easiest and earliest methods: For that design, you'll need this part (3650): You can also do something similar using a combination of bevel gears or double bevel gears:


3

You can use a mechanism like this: This is a mechanism that converts circular motion into reciprocating motion. You may need to alter the design for your needs regarding height difference, stability etc.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible