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6

Assuming that you're asking about the engine in particular, it seems to be a large number of pneumatic engines that have been coupled together in order to supply the required torque. LEGO pneumatic engines typically consist of a pneumatic cylinder driving a crankshaft. Here's a basic picture to give you an idea: The shaft usually also controls a pneumatic ...


5

You can accomplish this using gear racks (3743): You just have to create some type of channel that allows the rack to slide vertically, and then set up a gear to mesh with the rack. You can do this however you like, but here's a quick example that I built to show you what I mean:


5

Here's one simple way to accomplish this using just basic parts: This isn't quite a pure Technic example, but that construction is almost exactly what was used on the steam cylinders on Emerald Night: Depending on exactly what you are trying to do, there are also some specialized parts that make building decorative pistons simple. For example, here's ...


4

The problem can be restated: 360 / 20 = 18 deg / sec = 1 deg / .056 sec One degree is the smallest increment provided by the rotation sensors. NXT-G has a timer sensor with 1/100th second resolution. In pseudo-code: Set a motorPower variable to 10 Start a timer Loop until rotationDegrees >= 360 If timeElapsed * 18 > rotationSensorDegrees ...


4

The simplest way to get different speeds is by changing the gears. The instructions get you to build it with a 12:20 gear down in the portal axles, so the easiest way to change the speed is to flip those to get 20:12. From memory that will not work because it interferes with other parts of the model. You can fit two 16 tooth gears in there instead, giving a ...


3

What you are describing is called backdriving. I teach my students, in principle, not to backdrive the output shaft of a gearbox, motor/gearbox, or servo/gearbox unless they know what's inside of it because you can damage the unit. I use a variety of different robots in my class so what I'm explaining applies to gear drives in general. If you grasp the ...


3

You can use a mechanism like this: This is a mechanism that converts circular motion into reciprocating motion. You may need to alter the design for your needs regarding height difference, stability etc.


3

There are a number of ways to do this. This is one of the easiest and earliest methods: For that design, you'll need this part (3650): You can also do something similar using a combination of bevel gears or double bevel gears:


3

The basic LEGO Power Functions motors (M, L, XL) use a fairly standard DC motor internally. The terms synchronous and asynchronous only apply to AC motors. I'm not sure exactly where you are headed with this question, but if you are curious about whether or not PF motors can be controlled directly from a simple voltage source, the answer is yes. You don't ...


2

LEGO Power Functions would probably be the most suitable option. You could use a PF M-Motor (8883) combined with a PF AAA Battery Box (88000) which has a two-way switch and is more than capable of powering four medium size or two extra large motors (each item sold separately).


1

I suggest using google to search for them. When I did that I found two threads on EuroBricks discussing this - here and here. The first thread links to a youtube video that has downloadable instructions. Note that the instructions are 19MB and the website is fairly slow.


1

In NXT-G if you place a block after another block it will run in succession. To get two motors running at the same time you can place two motor blocks, one at the start and the other just above or below. Drag the sequence beam (the white Technic beam) to the second block to complete the circuit. Don't forget to make sure the motor blocks are controlling ...


1

It depends on the programming language, but assuming you're using NXT-G then the Move block may be sufficient. The Move block is designed to coordinate 2 motors so that they both rotate at the same speed over a distance. The Move block has settings for speed/power of the motion. There is a forward/backward setting. There is also a steering setting, which ...


1

Joubarc's idea would probably be your best bet - try downloading the file to the NXT using the official LEGO software. If this fails, you know something is wrong with your brick. If it works, it's probably a problem with your program. Did anything major happen between the time it would work and the time it wouldn't? If so, this may be the culprit. Trying it ...


1

You can switch 4 pairs of gears on each end of the crawler (2 pairs in the portal hubs and another 2 pairs inside the gearbox infront of the motor) do this on both ends or you run the risk of broken gears or premature motor wear. I ran 12 tooth gears all the way from the motor to my hubs for a dramatic increase in speed however the torque suffered severely, ...


1

I built the 3 to 4 multiplexer posted above (thank you for posting that) but was able to tweak it into a 2 to 4 mux. The axles that are connected to the large gears are used to select the outputs by rotating the large gears. It ended up being too big for what I needed though so I went a different route and built a 2 to 4 multiplexer that uses a turntable ...



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