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One way to do this would be to look through the Bricklink categories for minifig torso assemblies and minifig leg assemblies. There are a lot of them, but once you find the part you are looking for, you can then learn what set it came from which should lead you to a couple of complete minifigs (click the part id then click the "View" link under "This Part ...


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I designed and built a lego sorting and storage desk for my son late last year. It has 16 bins and 16 corresponding holes in the top. It also has an interior baffle system to keep lego pieces from jumping into incorrect bin. I had to go through several designs to get it to work right, be ergonomic (all drop slots within reach while seated), and make it ...


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My puny brain can only come up with one method: One Piece At A Time. Check for the LEGO logo somewhere. Sometimes it's hard to find. On the Brick, Round 1 x 1 with Fins it's on the bottom of one of the fins. Seems that most of the time there are minor, yet obvious, mold differences. Some brands, like Kre-O have an indent on one or more studs. I have ...


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Well if you need to organize your collection in a neat way that is easy to get to, I would use tackle boxes that you would normally use for fishing, because they come in all sorts of sizes and shapes and it can be easy to organize your collection in a neat way.


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Sorting LEGO bricks is more complex than you might think. Frequency of use, shape of the brick, and communication with others are essential features of a good classification. Have a look at this book, it covers the sorting of LEGO bricks extensively: The Ideal Order



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