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8

That number is not a real number, it is a production code (in your case, 27S5) consisting of 2 digits indicating the week of the year the set was made (in this case, the 27th week), a letter indicating the region the box was made in/for (R = US/Canada, S = Europe, I believe) and the last digit is the last digit of the year the set was made in. So you have a ...


5

According to this bricksetforum thread (and also true of the LEGO sets we have around right now) the LEGO bags are #5 plastic which is accepted by Whole Foods and some municipal recycling services. This thread has interesting commentary on bag packing considerations. Not surprisingly LEGO Group is optimizing for efficiency and dependability. The bags and ...


4

The complexity of the model and the expected time to complete it will increase with the recommended age. Lower aged sets, like the Juniors line, feature builds that rely heavily on standard stacking and more basic bricks. As the age recommendation goes up, you'll see more advanced building techniques such as offset stacking (think stair stacking), studs ...


2

Use a manual impulse sealer. It consists of a linear heating element specifically for sealing bags in the fashion LEGO parts bags are sealed by the factory. Narrow sealers can be purchased new online for as little as $12-15. It's helpful that LEGO parts bags are relatively small. I use these devices to reuse bags for various non-LEGO parts storage. ...


2

One way of resealing the bags is to use a laminator. Most laminators aren't designed to seal anything other than lamination pouches so you'd want to be particularly careful using them to re-seal LEGO bags. No matter how careful you are when you open them, most polybags tear slightly and leave rough edges that cannot be fed easily into a laminator. I ...



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