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37

This image shows the dimensions in LEGO Units. 1 Lego Unit is 1.6mm (the thickness of the plastic wall). In those units the stud's diameter is 3 (= 4.8mm).


28

I did the unthinkable! ...I had to know. I opened one of my two weighted bricks. One of the two ends has a glued on cap that I've cut around using an utility knife. The piece of metal it contains fit almost perfectly in the cavity. I don't know metals but it has a rainbowish kind of sheen to it. Here's a close up: I'm now gluing it back with ...


27

The "Extra Large" grey baseplate is 15"/38cm square, with 48 studs to a side. Alternatively, the moulded castle baseplate had a greater volume (with hight), and a base size of 32x48 studs and 6 bricks high (15"x10"/38x25cm) (in other colours as well): Tim offered up the following, also with a base size of 32x48 studs, 6 bricks high (15"x10"/38x25cm) (it ...


21

In the 60s, Lego did produce a separate system for architectural modelling called Modulex which used a 1:1 ratio 5mm cube as its basic brick. It wasn't successful and was discontinued in the late 60s. I believe the 6:5 was chosen so that studs could fit into the geometry. Related: why the plate is 1/3 of the brick's height. By adding two plates to the ...


20

This is a "Underwater Scooter". It's a handheld device to propel a diver forward. Similar devices can be seen in the James Bond movie "Thunderball".


19

Usually, the LEGO group doesn't seem to have much organisation; at least in the past. That's why you can find sets with two different numbers, or two different sets with the same number. Now the keyword here is "seem", as I suppose there was some logic to it even in the past. But nowadays there is some logic, and even if not all of it is understandable, ...


18

This image from Brickipedia should sum it up nicely: A plate is exactly one third of a brick in height (3.2 mm as in the diagram). In other words, 3 plates stack to match the height of a brick. This is useful to know if you're short on a certain size of brick, but have enough plates of the same shape and color to cover it in height.


18

The problem here is that fans started to name parts way before LEGO started to make its internal part names a bit more public. As such, there are various naming conventions around, including: LDraw — the oldest, used by peeron and in all LDraw-based CAO programs (which is to say, most of them); BrickLink — Generally uses the same names as LDraw, with a few ...


17

That is a Vehicle, Mudguard 2 x 4 with Arch Studded (and a darn hard part to figure out at that).


17

From principles of molding, you want a uniform part thickness throughout if possible. This facilitates plastic flow as well as dimensional stability (you want uniform shrinkage on cooling.) Removing a divot from the underside of a stud serves this purpose in a regular brick. The Technic brick with through holes would have had a large amount of solid ...


17

As said, this is the point where the injection happens, usually known as a gate. Sometimes, LEGO tries to have in a non-visible place, but the process of moulding is extremely complicated and forces specific requirements on the gate placement which mean it's sometimes impossible to hide it. The basic rule of thumb is that the gate is usually near the center ...


17

In most cases you can find the weight of a brick from Bricklink an unofficial LEGO site that takes weight measurements from user submitted data. Bricklink states the 1x4 brick as 1.64 grams in weight. LEGO bricks tend to be odd weights because the design process primarily focusses on the physical aspect. A 1x8 and 2x4 brick both have exactly eight studs, ...


16

The studless have SEVERAL advantages over the studded design especially when you want to include moving parts. Just the clearances between connections is important. Sariel sums it up in his book well. He says there are advantages to both systems (stud-full, for example, are more rigid) but the fact that the stud-less look more realistic and, of course, the ...


15

These aren't defects, they're a scar from the moulding process, it marks where the plastic was pumped into the brick. It's more noticeable on some bricks more then others, every brick manufactured this same way should have a similar mark.


15

The ridge is there to make the base the standard 5LUs wide (see also "What is an Erling Brick"), enabling it to accept the standard stud. I believe the rest of the brick was thinned out so that the combined "depth" of the Erling brick and a 1x1 plate (its common usage as a headlight) was the same height as a standard brick. From the HoMa's World of Bricks ...


15

One of the smallest pieces is the detachable handle on the 1 stud gear shift element. The black part in this complete lever:


15

The regular connector have simple angles which are multiples of 22.5°. #4 is 45°, #3 is 22.5° and #5 is 67.5°. That's pretty boring stuff, but there you go. The 53.5 angle isn't as bizarre as you would think and there's a very good reason for it (and less boring to me, but YMMV). That reason is that it forms a Pythagorean triangle, and specifically the ...


14

The screwdriver is also very small, but I'm not sure it beats the lever handle. Also, one could argue it has to be detached from the tools wheel first. But if you buy second-hand lots, there's a good chance it would be detached, and it would easily escape through small holes. Similarly, the various plumes aren't very large either:


14

The full-base 1x1 round bricks were produced from 1955 until 1963, during the period when LEGO pieces were made from cellulose acetate (CA) plastic, but were sold until about 1966. According to Gary Istok's Unofficial LEGO Sets/Parts Collector's Guide the solid-stud full-base 1x1 round brick was only ever made from CA plastic. After the supply of them ran ...


13

Most elements will have their official "Design ID" imprinted on them - this is typically the longer number, and can usually be used on the Pick a Brick site or sites such as BrickLink and Peeron to track down additional bricks. Note that this is different to the "Element ID" that is printed in the instruction part inventories which has the colour encoded ...


13

Although I can't think of any sets that make use of this technique, I have found that the Slope, Curved 4×1 Double No Studs fits perfectly under the new-style arches.


12

In my opinion, you don't need to look further than plastic quantity, and thus cost. Take a normal brick or plate (easier) and look inside it. You'll notice that each stud is hollow, but from below. Why? Simply because there's no need to have it full with material as it serves no purpose. It's easy to make the mould that way, it doesn't remove any ...


12

Lego is generally quite robust, but there are potential weaknesses: Material Problems Some parts are prone to damage as a consequence of the material from which they are made: Plastic Sunlight can cause discoloration Bricks can be damaged by extremes of temperature Older bricks (pre ABS) are prone to warping, discoloration and may become brittle Most ...


12

Currently in use: Stud and "antistud" (diameter 4.6mm) Longer studs (Minifig torso) Minifig legs Minifig neck and head / accessory (eg backpack) - also compatible with studs Clip and bar (in a way, similar to stud, but with diameter 3.2mm) Wheels (3.2mm axles) Flower connector (similar, but even smaller, present in a surprising number of parts, including ...


12

The problem isn't with molding machines, but with storage. Every distinct element (part/colour combination) has to be stored until it's no longer going to be used in production; presumably some are stored for spare parts and other ancillary uses. The robotic warehouse has only a certain number of slots (a mere 0.5 million), so there's only so many ...


12

I guess I could send the question to math.se, but I think we can figure that one out ourselves; it's just a bit of trigonometry after all, right? Let's see: - The large side is 20 ldu (standard brick width). - The small side is 16 ldu (2 plates) - 4 ldu (half a plate), that is 12 ldu (half the height of a brick). So the angle is tan-1(12/20), which is ...


12

These pieces are frequently used for decoration now, but they were originally used for sliding doors, particularly on train sets. Here's one of the first uses from set 7838 in 1983: While they could be used in structures, these were frequently used for putting doors on the train cars themselves: These parts can also be used to create tracks for other ...


11

Bricklink search for chrome pieces Gold 2x4 Duplo: Chrome 2X4


11

This is likely a hold-over from when these were used primarily as roof pieces, and the texture provided some realism to the house/building sets.


11

I had two of these bricks in red, one is broken (one of the side-caps dropped off): there's just a piece of galvanized iron/steel in it. My blocks were bought about 19 years ago, so maybe they changed the weight to an other/cheaper material in the meantime, but I don't think so.



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