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11

I guess I could send the question to math.se, but I think we can figure that one out ourselves; it's just a bit of trigonometry after all, right? Let's see: - The large side is 20 ldu (standard brick width). - The small side is 16 ldu (2 plates) - 4 ldu (half a plate), that is 12 ldu (half the height of a brick). So the angle is tan-1(12/20), which is ...


10

Bricklink lists two: OLD: http://www.bricklink.com/catalogItem.asp?P=6007 NEW: http://www.bricklink.com/catalogItem.asp?P=96874 There is one other 'separator', but it doesn't look like it's very good for bricks: http://www.bricklink.com/catalogItem.asp?P=x1220 ETA: The Clickits Separator! http://www.bricklink.com/catalogItem.asp?P=clikits021


10

Although I can't think of any sets that make use of this technique, I have found that the Slope, Curved 4×1 Double No Studs fits perfectly under the new-style arches.


10

The problem isn't with molding machines, but with storage. Every distinct element (part/colour combination) has to be stored until it's no longer going to be used in production; presumably some are stored for spare parts and other ancillary uses. The robotic warehouse has only a certain number of slots (a mere 0.5 million), so there's only so many ...


8

Here's the simplest way that I can think of to stop the vehicle at the finish line. You'll need basic LEGO Technic parts and a good length of lightweight string or thread. Create two reels for the string. One should be connected to the wheels and the other may turn freely. Wind all the string onto the reel which can spin freely and attach the other end ...


7

I didn't intend to answer my own question, but after reading through the comments and doing some more digging, I think it is clear that this was intended to be a hawsehole (hole that the anchor rope passes through). The 12 x 12 boat bow in question is a chronological descendant of the 16 x 12 boat bow: That larger part was created with the launch of the ...


7

Here are the options that I'm aware of along with some basic pros and cons: Peeron This site is great for old sets, and has some nice functionality including the ability to compile a list of all the parts in all of your sets for you have. This makes it easy to start your part inventory. All you have to do is import your sets and then export your parts ...


7

A cheese slope resembles a chunk of cheese from a cheese wheel. They happen to also be the perfect size for minifigures to interact with: ‘Lego Cheese Farm’ by AIatariel, http://www.flickr.com/photos/alatariel1181/10582728886/


6

It looks like it could be either #3049 or #3049c. Part #3049 currently exists in Sand Blue in at least three sets. As for the change in smooth and rough texture you may wish to read this answer by Joubarc.


5

3652 Technic Engine Piston Square 2 x 2 This part was included in sets from 1977 until 1995, but it began to be replaced by 2851 starting in 1990: The main advantage of the newer piston is that it allows more pistons to fit in a smaller area of space. The piston is able to fit into the 2850 2x2 cylinder: The old piston required a brick-built 4x4 ...


5

The city people pack is probably 9348: Community Minifigure Set based on the clasic space minifig print. The numbered bags are probably from 4635: Fun With Vehicles - that's based on the colours and the lime green/"bright yellow/green" cap. I think the first 2 bags are from 6118: Wheels and Tyres. This set has the same number of the small (8x) and bigger ...


5

The 1955 Bedford Esso truck sets that oddTodd refers to were the earliest appearance of a company name/logo on a product in the LEGO system, however these trucks were sold separately as part of the Town Plan, without bricks (although some versions of the 1251 set came with 1x1 bricks that were used as oil cans). An accessory set from 1955 included gas pumps ...


5

Ultra-violet radiation is emitted primarily by sunlight, mercury lamps, black lights. LEDs emitting visible light will not produce a significant amount of UV radiation required to discolour LEGO bricks. However, LEDs can be manufactured to emit UV light,


4

I also think those parts are painted, but I would like to add one more thing. The LEGO Friends sets have these cute cupcake holders that are quite similar, and no painting is required. They come in four colors, and you can easily insert a 1x1 round tile inside to add the "food". Here is the link: http://www.bricklink.com/catalogItem.asp?P=93082g And here is ...


4

My guess is that they're LEGO Round Plate 1 x 1 Straight Side (Part ID: 4569058 Design ID: 6141) with paint applied to make them look like food. Details of some of the sets that contain them are available on BrickLink.


4

I seem to remember it's 2 rows of 8 bricks, with the plastic flow coming in the middle and being distributed in the mould through a pipe running between the two rows, but I can't find any reference for this. It could very well be that future moulds are optimised to hold more, though, but that's porbably not going to happen unless there's a good reason. ...


4

Esso (aka ExxonMobil) showed up in one of the first sets ever, released in 1955. Bedford, a truck maker, was also represented in the same set (and others from that year). I do not know if there were Bedford sets released before the Esso/Bedford sets, since they were all released in the same year. http://www.bricklink.com/catalogItem.asp?S=1250-2 Esso also ...


4

In the case of 87609, the piece was first used in 2010 as part of the grill/bumper assembly for vehicles that were the standard 6 studs wide. Its length would appear to be a result of its original purpose. Its width also allows for attaching two rows of detail: 99206 showed up first in 2012. Its design allows for a more compact construction in ...


3

An alternative to using BrickLink for those purposes would be http://rebrickable.com. I personally find the interface to have some warts, but definitely better than BrickLink in a lot of ways. In particular to your requested features it does support importing parts from sets (Look for the "Add to my Parts (Part out set)" link on any set description page) as ...


3

I was just reading about the 8485 Technic Control Center II, where you can make a dinosaur, helicopter, or hovercraft controlled by a big panel, and which I have on hand. According to a reviewer (http://www.eurobricks.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=75864) there are a few rare pieces that were included with this set, which retailed for $219 in 1995. The price ...


3

The thing with ABS is a bit more than that simple. The general rule is that if you want to have different/better plastic you need to play with small amounts of co-polymers. 99-point-something of your plastic is the main co-polymer, but the 0-point-nothing decides about fine-tuning of properties. A bit more than 10 years ago a friend of mine was working for ...


3

Both Lego and MEGA Brands use injection-molded ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) plastic to manufacture their elements. The most obvious difference between the two manufacturing processes is that Lego elements tend to have thicker walls than Mega Blok elements. That accounts for the cheaper "feel" and less clutch power. Obviously MEGA does this to save ...


3

Fikko3107 is correct, it is in fact a LEGO rubber band holder, for storing two different sizes of rubber bands. It's purpose insofar as the Bohrok sets are concerned, I'm afraid I don't know enough about Bionicle to give you an answer. Perhaps the instruction booklet may offer some clues? As masterX244 stated, it is unofficially known as the 'nnenn' ...


2

In my experience, the Bricklink catalog is the most complete parts list. It is organized in fairly logical tree by part type (brick, plate, wheels, slope, etc). Once you get familiar with it, you should be able to identify parts fairly quickly. Rebrickable isn't as useful for creating an exact inventory of the parts you have, because part of its goal is to ...


2

The easiest way to achive what you want to is register as a seller. You don't have to sell anything (you could keep your store open but empty, or you could just keep your store closed). Once you have a seller account you can manage two stockrooms: A and B. If you do have some sets/parts you are planning to sell and want to have an active store, you can ...


2

ATC is the Asahi Toy Company from Japan. Here are the pages from their 1971 catalog showing some of their construction sets:


2

As was mentioned in another answer, the cheese slope looks like a slice of cheese at around minifigure scale. This part has also actually been used as cheese in official sets, including Medieval Market Village:


2

With a lot of part redesigns, there's usually a factor which is considered very highly by LEGO: cost reduction, and more precisely the amount of plastic moulded. Another example of this is the way posts under 1 x n bricks are now hollow. I've heard a more subtle one recently: the sides of the Arch 1 x 5 x 4 are thinner than before, which doesn't seem to ...


1

The numbered bags are probably from 4635: Fun With Vehicles - that's based on the colours and the lime green/"bright yellow/green" cap. However even with 9348 Community Minifigure Set there's still an unidentified bag of wheels...


1

Fikko, it is not a regular part. It is simply a piece of plastic for holding the rubber bands that came in sets to make sure they are visible enough and won't get lost in the packaging. And you could also use them to store your rubber bands so they won't get lost. These days LEGO uses a little paper-sleeve for rubber-bands, string, etc., however before ...



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