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20

This is a "Underwater Scooter". It's a handheld device to propel a diver forward. Similar devices can be seen in the James Bond movie "Thunderball".


8

This would be a Crane Bucket - Complete Assembly (Top, Jaws, Spring). It could have come from any of 29 sets from 1974 to 2012.


8

This is an Technic Steering Arm and was used is the steering mechanism of all kind of technic car like 1972-1: Go-Kart With the introduction of studless building it was replaced by Beam 3 M. W/4 Snaps.


8

It's difficult to tell exactly what part this fragment came from, but it looks like it is part of a broken Technic gear or pulley. It looks like it probably came from 3736: Your fragment looks like it was probably once one half of the center axle hole of that part. In terms of repair, I suppose you could try to glue this back together, but given that it ...


6

These pieces are not included in the set. Motorizing this set requires the addition of a Power Functions motor as shown here: You'll need the Power Functions Motor Set (8293) if you'd like to motorize your truck. This can be ordered from shop.lego.com or other online retailers. It's usually hard to find in stores, but if you have a LEGO store nearby, they ...


6

i think you mean this part Yellow Torso Nesquik Bunny Large 'N' Pattern / Yellow Arms / Brown Hands from 4051-1": Nesquick Rabbit or 4049-1:Nesquick Rabbit Film Set


6

It would be a Slope, Curved 2 x 2 Lip, No Studs with Island Xtreme Stunts Logo and Flames Pattern.


6

This is part is commonly found in the Divers theme back in the late 90's (http://brickset.com/sets/theme-Town/subtheme-Divers) The part in question is a minifigure accessory: http://www.bricklink.com/catalogItem.asp?P=30092


5

Without batteries installed, the NXT brick weighs 159.3 grams, so that's about 0.351 pounds. Do take into account the added weight of what ever batteries you have installed, though, as that will almost double the weight, and not all types of AA batteries weigh the same. If you're using a rechargeable battery, then for reference, the original NXT ...


5

They were used until 1990 for trains, the holes are there to stick in the wheels. This is the part: http://www.bricklink.com/catalogItem.asp?P=7049b And these (for example) were the wheels: http://www.bricklink.com/catalogItem.asp?P=wheel2a


5

The sloped face of the 2x2 brick is 16mm across by about 11.3mm tall.


4

Just measured them myself. Some of the dimensions might be just a little bit off, but I hope this suffices: NXT: Length: 111 mm Width: ~71.7 mm Height: 40 mm (extra 8 mm if you have a rechargeable battery installed) Motor: Length: ~105 mm Width: 40 mm Height: ~45 mm Ultra-sonic Sensor: Length: 44 mm Width: 44 mm Height: 30 mm Generic Sensor: ...


4

This is one half of a "hydraulic" cylinder used like in the bucket of 7685-1: Dozer. This element is Fric. Element, Cylinder and used often used in combination with Stick 6M W/Flange


4

This steering wheel is from 4613-1: Turbo Chopper, as this is the only one with an orange version of this element.


4

These are all fairly common parts that shouldn't be hard to find. It looks like they are a cheese slope (50746), a 1x1 tile (3070), and a 1x1 round plate (4073). These parts are common enough that they are available in many sets, or you can purchase them separately from LEGO Pick-a-brick. If you're looking for a more affordable secondary market, you could ...


4

I think the piece you're referring to is Dinosaur Tail / Neck Middle Section with Pin.


4

What I remembered of those parts was that force was needed to snap them together, and I believe I also have some that are broken over the years. The part was introduced in 1983, updated in 1985 and the last sets were released in 2002 with one set in 2004. In 2003 the parts are replaced by Hinge Plate 1 x 2 Locking with Dual Finger on End Vertical' (44302) ...


3

gev has the exact name of the piece, but I'd like to add one more point that could be helpful. When trying to identify pieces as Lego or non-Lego, pay attention to the more obscure standard connections. The small ball above the hinge is a standard small ball joint connection, recently revitalized by the Mixels series (among other things). It connects to the ...


3

I can't find any evidence that a 2x2x4 piece has ever existed. Bricklink identifies a 2x2x3 brick, and there are many sellers around the world that will happily sell you 16 dark stone grey pieces for pennies/piece.


3

In the case of this item, it means that the gear will slide freely along the axle it rotates around.


3

As you have probably guessed by now, there is no easy solution to your question. It all comes down to computer vision. In this solution, Akiyuki built a massive machine out of LEGO bricks, a camera, a scale, 2 Mindstorm NXT and, which he fails to mention in is parts list, a computer and some electronics. Computer vision is complex, and making a working ...


3

Is it possibly from Quicky the Nesquik Bunny figure?


3

Oh, I should have read further down the page. There were special panes of "glass" in frames that fit the slots.


2

I'd say the yellow part is listed on BrickSet as "Lamp Holder" or "Plate, Modified 1 x 1 with Clip Light - Thick Ring", 4081 on BrickLink, Peeron, etc. The light grey piece is from the Flick Missiles, and is listed on Brickset as "3 M.Arch W.Knob And Shaft ظ3.2" or "Technic, Pin 1/2 with 2L Bar Extension (Flick Missile)", 61184. The final piece is "Mini ...


2

Almost assuredly it is a move to reduce the amount of plastic used. It may seem inconsequential, but adding up hundreds of millions of these makes for a ton of savings. The same thing goes for the brick walls, but not in the case of the ones you show here. I haven't seen it in any 1x bricks, but in most 2x bricks these days, the walls are a tiny bit thinner ...


2

I've been wondering the reasons why a number of pieces are no longer available and it appears the decision to reduce the overall amount of different pieces is simply a cost based one. From a Q/A with someone from the Lego Company: "...the piece count has been reduced drastically and there's a move back to roots in Lego, not only for creativity but to save ...


2

As mentioned by @gev, Bricklink is a great place to go. It is, however, not the most intuitive site to use. Here is how you can easily get the item counts: Start with the Search box at the top of the page. Before typing in the name of the set, make sure the selector is set to search the Catalog. Enter a term from the name of the set (e.g. "Millenium" or ...


2

Some of these pieces are released as collectors items (Gifts for Lego employees) or sold as novelties at LEGOLAND parks or stores pick a brick areas, others are from official Lego events (grand openings of stores, new LEGOLANDs, etc.) they are often given as gifts to people attending the events. Some are test bricks that somehow made their way out of the ...


2

Almost any set I can think of will have many many non-plate parts, even if it also has lots of plates in it. Plus you run into the problem of determining what constitutes a "plate". Does this count? or this? or this? If I were you I'd just go down the list of sets you can purchase on shop.lego.com, visually inspect the set to see if it looks like it has lots ...


2

The best set from 2014 is Furry Creatures (31021) at $0.20 per plate. Here's one possible way to do this: Download the listing of all parts in all sets from Rebrickable. Join this data up with pricing data (perhaps from the Brickset API) to get yourself some pricing information for each set. Define which parts count as plates. Write yourself a little ...



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