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141

37,112 times Well I did it. I built a machine to test this. It took 10 days until the LEGO at the bottom couldn't stay on anymore. Check my blog for more details


19

Actually, it depends on the part. Most parts are indeed ABS as it's a very sturdy plastic, but sometimes it's not suitable, or downright impossible to use. I've seen a presentation on quality issues given by a LEGO employee in LEGOworld a few years back, and as far as I remember there were between 10 and 20 sorts of plastic in use. The ones I remember are: ...


15

ABS maximum temperature is 80C (176F) and melt at 105C (221F) Polycarbonate plastic used for transparent bricks melt at 267C (512.6F) Since a candle flame has a temperature in excess of 1000C (1832F). I would advise against making a candle holder of LEGO bricks. Plastic types are explained on this question.


15

All of this is correct, ABS can't be transparent and thus transparent parts are made of PC. PC against PC bonds way too tighly and designers are actually forbidden to do that in their models. (I've a 4L lightsaber blade stuck in the crossend of a Technic beam, both trans-red, and I can't get it out.) I'm fairly sure there's a designer (possibly Jamie Berard ...


14

The main restaurant in the LEGOLAND park in Windsor has quite a lot of LEGO creations in fishtanks. In the same park, the Sealife attraction 'Atlantis Submarine Voyage' has 50 species of sharks, rays and tropical fish that happily coexist with the LEGO models. Keep in mind that LEGO is safe from children saliva, which I'm willing to bet is more aggressive ...


13

Black. Peeron.com has a colour table that lists how many pieces of each colour you would have if you had one of every set in their database. Obviously their database is not complete, it doesn't relate to when ABS was introduced (but most of the pieces produced in all time will have been since then), and some sets have been produced in higher numbers, so ...


10

The LEGO company switched to ABS in 1963, bricks produced before that have a markedly different quality. However, if your sets are from around 1980, they should use ABS already and there should be no reason that the plastic is different. Other possible explanations would be bad storage conditions (too warm, direct sunlight, maybe), or the fat that the set ...


10

The optimal clutch power is attained after 8 to 10 couplings(search for "clutch"); that is, before that, the bricks will sometimes cling a little too much on each other. However, I don't think anyone ever actually stated when clutch power would start to deteriorate. I'd tend to assume that once the optimal clutch is reached, there is just enough plastic at ...


6

Lego baseplates are made from ABS plastic, like most of the opaque rigid plastic Lego elements since 1970. ABS is a thermoplastic consisting of a styrene monomer with the addition of an acrylonitrile momomer and a butadiene monomer. There is no PVC or vinyl present. I suggest reviewing this thread for more on laser-cutting ABS. It is not a trivial matter to ...


5

I suggest calling Lego customer service (1-800-835-4386) to ask them about a bulk order. Professional "brick artists" like Nathan Sawaya buy their brick directly from Lego. The bulk prices are decent as well. For example, through the LUGbulk program, we got 2x4 bricks for about 9.6 cents each (these sell for $0.30/ea on the Pick-a-brick website). Also, here ...


3

I'm not sure there's any official answer for this, however I can answer with an anecdote. There have been a few times where I've come across old bricks that have been assembled together for a very long time (ie many years). When prised apart, I've spotted that the studs have actually made an indentation on the sides of the tubes. Based on this, I wonder ...


3

According to a letter from a LEGO representative posted at this site: Tires and elastic materials found in some LEGO sets are manufactured from Styrene-Butadiene Styrene (SBS), a material commonly found in vehicle mud guards and shoe soles.


2

As you can see from other answers, it may prove easier to try to get genuine LEGO bricks and there are numerous possibilities to do so: As mentioned in OddTodd's answer, the LUGBulk program may be an option, but you'll need to find a local LUG and convince them of the parts you need. As seen in the comments, limits may be an issue. Contacting the LEGO ...


2

In a recent document about the Pick-A-Brick cups comparisons, there was a segment that caught my eye. (bottom of page 7). Official LEGO stores also sell a $70 box of a single piece type. This isn’t something they advertise, but you can ask what they have available and they will sell it to you. It’s also called a “K2 box.” Measuring the volume of ...


2

Unfortunately, I'm not aware of specific factories that are currently tooled to make compatible bricks that you could get in touch with. I have noticed an eBay user that consistently sells Canadian made compatible basic bricks, so it might be worth contacting them to see if you could work out a deal. There are also many companies who will do custom ABS ...


1

This sounds like something to ask the corporate offices. They may be able to arrange shipments that even the LEGO stores can not. For instance, Thomas Nielson is the VP of manufacturing at TLG http://dk.linkedin.com/in/thomasnielsen?trk=pub-pbmap If the stores can't get it to you, go to those who supply the stores. It certainly sounds like you generate ...



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