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14

RCX has 3 motor and 3 sensor ports. NXT has 3 motor and 4 sensor ports. The NXT has encoders integrated in its motors so that they can be used as servos. On the RCX you would need an additional rotation sensor on a sensor port to do that. RCX uses regular 9V connectors (2x2 with metal in studs). NXT uses RJ12 connectors with the latch offset to one side. ...


10

LEGO used to sell Converter Cables for Mindstorms NXT at a price of £8.99 / US$9.99 for 3 cables at their online shop, they can still be bought online from stores like Bricklink. Considering the price of each cable converter it may be worth purchasing newer sensors/motors that are more advanced. The NXT system cables are separate from sensors and motors ...


10

The older RCX 1.0 had a power plug inbuilt. However Philo has shown how to create one yourself in a fairly simple way: LEGO® 9V Technic Motors compared characteristics, scroll down to the section "Getting maximum mechanical power from RCX output" towards the bottom of the page. The idea is to create two fake batteries and draw a wire from each, creating a ...


8

The cables you point out are newer Power Function cables and are ill-suited for 9V usage such as with the original Mindstorms kits. Technically, you could daisy-chain two of them and it would work, but that's probably not the best solution. Here is a bigger illustration of the cable, courtesy Philo: You can clearly see that only one end of the cable has ...


7

The hardware of RCX 2.0 is identical to 1.5, and the only difference between these two and version 1.0 is the charging port which had been removed. So they're compatible and you can indeed use a newer firmware on an older brick. You'll need the Mindstorms 2.5 SDK, which contains the latest official firmware. It's probably not on the LEGO site any more, but ...


6

Yes, you can use all RCX sensors and motors with a NXT brick. Don't forget about lamps, too. The connections are different though, so as Ambo100 says, you will need converter cables. However, if you don't want to pay the full price for them, you can also make some yourself which isn't really that difficult. The other thing you need to consider is how to ...


6

The NXT can, with the use of an adapter cable, use the RCX sensors and motors, however the RCX can not use the NXT sensors and motors. The NXT brick, motors and sensors are larger than the RCX counterparts which makes them harder to implement into a size constrained construction. However as said, you can use the RCX motors/sensors instead with the NXT brick ...


6

Take a look at SR 3D Builder. I have not used this software myself but it looks like it may do what you need. It's free (for non-commercial use) and you can import your LDraw files. Here is a link to some videos on YouTube See below for the features list (taken from the website) NEW Support for Piston - Rod mechanism NEW Support for Linear Actuators and ...


6

I have the RCX IR tower setup and working on my Windows 7 laptop. I downloaded the drivers from the ROBOTC.net site here (labeled 'RCX Device driver') Direct file download link Note: I am running Windows 7 32-bit, according to the ROBOTC site, this driver is 32.bit only and No known 64-bit driver is available for the RCX.


5

Your code handling the behaviours like "Shoot 3 times if the touch sensor is triggered" or "Shoot if the light sensor is triggered" should use 'if' statements. Then, instead of always being called, the "shooting" code would append only on sensor events. After shooting, the robot would then go back to the "Driving around" part of the code. This page is a ...


5

The LEGO Group removed the power adaptor on RCX bricks included in the Robotics Invention System 1.5 onwards - These are often referred to as 1.1 or 1.5 bricks.


5

No, the standard NXT-G software provided by LEGO will not allow you to program a RCX brick. Outside of official software, your best bet is probably to use NQC which is C-like; there's also NXC for the NXT which is similar. There are a lot of others which have been discussed in the following questions: Is there any other way to program the Lego Mindstorms ...


5

Communication with the RCX Brick was via the Infra Red tower (or IR Remote Control) which connected to the computer with either a serial or USB cable. As neither iPhone nor iPad have an IR port, there's no way to connect directly between the two. You might be able to do something with a docked iOs device, but that strikes me as somewhat pointless.


4

About 8 to 10 years ago there was more RCX-compatible sensors makers on the web. Today, I don't think we'll find them unless we dig into the Internet Archive. It looks like Techno-Stuff is still making some RCX-compatible components. Also, Mindsensors was making RCX-compatible components also but I couldn't find links to them through their website main ...


3

You could try with NQC. By default it supports the Serial Tower and you can specify if you are using a USB Tower with -Susb . It works on Windows, Linux and Mac. The man page (documentation) can be found here or the in pdf format here.


3

RCX was a surpise hit. For NXT, TLG approached a select set of individuals in the community and picked their brains. The NXT is very open; schematics are available for sensors, 3rd-party sensors are available, etc.


3

I know the original Microsoft Robotics Studio supported building robots using the RCX bricks - although the latest version has been upgraded to NXT and it has simulation tools too for testing your robots prior to building and deploying your code. As the core components should be the same (gears, beams, etc.) you should be able to get a reasonable way ...


3

As far as I remember, the protocol LEGO uses is incompatible with standard IR protocols used in PCs (not even the same frequency, if I remember correctly). The NQC FAQ has some more explanation on why it's not possible, but their short explanation says it all: Quite simply, these protocols are incompatable. (sic) You may have some success using a NXT ...


2

There are ipad adaptors for iPad, iPhone. Some connect to the data port, but others connect to the headphone jack, so are eminiently programmable - you presumably just need audio samples. Alex


2

LEGO Mindstorms was initially released in 1998, running on Windows 95/98, and Windows 2000 and XP were not supported let alone Windows 7. I know that they did release an updated install CD for the Mindstorms Vision Kit which allowed you to install it on Windows XP (I believe I've still got a copy of this somewhere), however you may be able to install the ...


2

I think you're overlooking a very simple yet elegant solution: connect a NXT motor to the motor port (no problem there, that's what it's for), connect a RCX rotation sensor to the RCX (again, the intended purpose), and by now you should pretty much know where I'm going with this: connect the rotation sensor mechanically to the NXT motor. Considering the NXT ...


2

If you are you using ROBOTC 2 for RCX you need to install the separate driver for windows 32bit. This driver is not included in the ROBOTC install (at least not with version 2.03). It might also be a good thing to start with a fresh install of ROBOTC 2.03.


2

There is no non-LEGO product that can substitute the infrared tower used for communicating with the RCX, as the USB and Serial towers use a very specific protocol that does not match that of other Infrared devices. Nonetheless, it does appear that there are schematics available for the IR Tower, courtesy of Mark Bellis: I'm no expert on low-level ...


2

The EV3 software is not backwards compatible with RCX 1.0. You will need to install the software from the CD-ROM that would have come with your set. If you do decide to purchase one online, you can do so from a 3rd party marketplace such as Bricklink. Be sure to install the correct version of the CD-ROM (RCX 1.0) and check to see if your operating system ...


1

I am currently maintaining my own fork of NQC for use on OpenBSD and OS X. As you have discovered, the recent compiler changes on OS X broke NQC in many places. Not to mention that the USB tower integration was pretty outdated. If you can compile it, it should work better than the ports version. AFAIK, I am now the de facto maintainer for NQC. (And may ...


1

I've found a seemingly broken website, but from the sources I was able to salvage these addresses, they work just fine (as far as the download goes, I did not check the contents): http://www.brickfactory.info/iso/9731_lego_vision_command_xp.zip http://www.brickfactory.info/iso/9722_extreme_creatures_1.0.zip There are many other downloadables from this ...


1

This did the trick for me. My situation mirrors the original poster. http://neuron.eng.wayne.edu/LEGO_ROBOTICS/software_setup_tutorial.html There are 4 parts to this. BrickControlCenter (brickcc), a driver for the IR tower, an image of the firmware and some other piece of software called the NCQ. I did not install the driver since I was using a USB ...


1

Please see this question: Lego Mindstorms RCX RIS 2.0 IR tower Windows 7 / Windows XP driver Basically there are no 64bit drivers available and the OP on the question I linked to says he had no luck with an XP VM either.


1

You could do it using a computer as an intermediate. Basically, you have a wireless connection between your iPhone and your computer, then the IR link between the computer and the RCX. It would be technically challenging but not impossible. The IR tower uses a serial port and the protocol is detailed here ...


1

I have a similar problem with my RCX 1.0. Also have a RCX 2.0 that loads the firmware just fine. After failing to load more up to date firmware I tried loading the original RCX 1.0 firmware from the original CD with a third party tool (ROBOTC) and got a checksum error. My RCX 1.0 has a hard time getting a signal from the USB IR tower that came with the ...



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