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10

The material deformation you are seeing is called ‘plasticity’. It happens when a material under stress is deformed and doesn’t return to its original shape (this would be called elasticity). In many cases (and it is the case with LEGO ABS plastic), this deformation weakens the material (as mentioned by Kramii). To fix this part you have to deform it ...


9

There's a YouTube video which explains how you can replace the battery in that light brick. You can also find the owner's explanation on the Eurobricks forums. Quoting from that site: What you'll need: ExoForce Light brick (obviously) A small screwdriver (or other item with a long, thin shaft) (my s'driver was 2mm (0.07 inches) thick) A ...


7

One of these? I regularly crushed these as a child. You could try inserting something small into the hole and gently easing it open. I've had modest success with a small screwdriver. Unfortunately, the gear will be weakened following a flattening. If it is badly squashed it is very likely break - either as you try to repair it or in use. Your best bet, ...


6

one thing that worked for me is to use a very small needle-nose plier or a tweezer to hold the torso from inside while pushing the crack apart (very carefully). now you can use a toothpick or a needle get a bit of superglue in the crack to fix it. note that this just works for bigger cracks like the ones going up to the armpits.


6

Here are the two easiest options: 1: Repair it. If you have a soldering kit, then get it out, and follow the instructions in this video. It worked for me the first try. 2: Replace it. Contact LEGO, and tell them of your problem. I've hear many success stories from people who did this, and LEGO replacing it for free. For one person, it took a week to ...


5

Taken from the additional notes of this bricks Bricklink catalogue entry. This item takes one CR927 3V Lithium battery. A very tiny flat screwdriver is needed to push the little clips to open up the assembly. I occasionally use the minifig-scale Axe, Crowbar or Screwdriver to pry plates, tiles and other bricks. If you don't have a ...


5

If you are using NXT-G, the software that comes with the NXT set, then here is what you do: Get into NXT-G, start a new program. Select the tools option, and from the drop-down menu, select "Update NXT Firmware..." Plug your USB cable (one comes with the set) into your NXT. Don't try using bluetooth, as it won't work. Click the download button on the ...


4

I'd suggest storing them straightened up for a while, if possible in 32 adjoining 1x2 bricks with cross hole, and add a few layers of bricks to hold them in place. At least it's a pure LEGO solution, but I'm not sure how efficient.


3

You won't be able to make it fit perfectly again. If plastic is stretched over a certain point it is irreversibly damaged. But you can try to heat it a little to shrink the wheel overall. But it's not guaranteed to work. If you use a lighter you can affect a smaller area but be sure not to burn your part.


3

Oh, those look sad! Stickers with white designs on them are notorious for peeling/cracking. I have found that the best way to protect stickers like these is to apply a thin layer of clearcoat to them while they are still new. Wait until the clearcoat dries, then apply the sticker to the LEGO set. You can use pretty much any acrylic clearcoat, medium or ...


3

The easiest solution, provided that motor is still in production, is to contact the LEGO customer service (this online form is usually the easiest way, but you can also call them), they'll usually provide a replacement without problem.


3

Maybe the plastic is worn off just enough that the switch is not pushing the pins completely anymore. Debug step 1: When the train pins are in the switch zone there shouldn't be a lot of space between the point of the pins and the face of the switch. If it looks too loose that could be the problem. A way to test this would be to put some clear scotch ...


3

I have had some success straightening bent train level crossing gate barriers by first immersing the pieces in a bowl of hot water*, for around 5 minutes to soften the plastic and then immediately trapping them between two hardback books and applying weights until they have cooled. So by using Joubarc's method to hold the axles straight combined with a ...


3

There is at least one possible way to hide the damage to a cracked torso and brace it at the same time. Wrapping the outside of a cracked minifig torso with a decal and/or a piece of transparent tape can increase the snugness of the pelvis/torso fit as well as reduce the rate of future cracking. There is a downside. If you do this without taking due care, ...


3

The parts become leaky due to the seals inside the pistons deteriorating. Typically, the seal is made with an "o-ring" - a circular rubber band (cross section as well as the shape) - if this is the case in the LEGO pistons, and then it's possible the o-rings are made with similar rubber to the LEGO rubber bands, and then they will deteriorate over time in ...


2

I don't think it's really possible to salvage it, as others said, you'll only weaken it more. Even if you can place it on an axle, there's a good chance it will break under stress. But replacement should be very easy to find, and don't forget you could also contact the LEGO customer service for that. It sounds a bit overkill, but they will usually happily ...


1

You can replace the arm with a new one by carefully removing the old arm and snapping in a newer one. Please note that this should not be done too often, as the procedure will damage the connection and could even crack the torso. LEGO never attempted the arms to be replaceable. It is not like snapping and unstapping bricks, however it can be done a couple ...


1

As someone already mentioned, I doubt there's any way to make it fit "perfectly" again but it may be possible to reduce the damage. Another way to apply heat is to use hot water. As for how hot, I've got no clue what temperature that particular material starts to soften at, but I'd start out with the hottest water you can get from the tap and increase the ...


1

I had this trouble when I was a nipper. My dad owned a model shop so I used the same glue that you use on Airfix type kits ("Polystyrene cement") - you can get this from model shops. Use a cocktail stick to smear a bit inside the figure, above where the top nobules of the legs will go so it won't interfere. Don't use too much because it kind of melts the ...


1

What I have found that works, most of the time, is DURO super glue. Extreme safety must be exercised as it is super glue and can cause skin to bond and burn as well as prove poisonous via inhalation. I would recommend using wet(with water) latex cleaning gloves as the water seems to prevent the gloves from sticking to themselves or each other to handle the ...


1

Here's what I did: First I tried a screwdriver and awl, but couldn't get it to work. What did work was pinching it with pliers to open the hole, and then sliding in a rod. The piece is intact, but very flexible now. It is very deformed, but becomes uniform when attached to an axle. I'm going to leave it attached for a while to see if it evens it out more. ...



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