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13

Garage-sales, estate-sales, second-hand stores, flea-markets and graigslists are the most common way to source out used LEGO. This is especially true in neighborhoods where there is a LEGO store nearby so a lot of kids have them, or where LEGO is popular in the community in general (suburbs and middle-class neighborhoods are especially great places to ...


6

BrickLink is by far the best place to buy LEGO. It is also very easy to use. Once you get how it works, you will never look back. There are several very helpful videos on YouTube showing you how to use BrickLink most efficiently. Here is one: http://youtu.be/Cyat8aFVk_k I have also put together a detailed written guide on how to use BrickLink here: ...


6

I would suggest that you first ask the buyer what they would like. For example I would definitely prefer to get the set fully disassembled as I would like to build it from scratch. If the buyer doesn't care which way you ship it, fully disassembled is still the safest way. It will take up less room and also it is less likely that parts will be damaged or ...


5

There is a whole site dedicated to working out how you can build a particular model using parts from other sets - Rebrickable. A combination of that and Bricklink would be cheaper as you'd end up with fewer extra parts. There's also a thread on EuroBricks where someone has done what you're doing and there are some useful tips (mostly about buying as much as ...


4

The main benefit is consistent performance. The rechargeable battery puts out almost the same voltage until it's almost flat, and whatever current is required with little voltage drop. Disposable batteries have more voltage, but cheap ones can't supply much current. Expensive ones can supply the current, but cost more. You'd be lucky to get 5 sets of those ...


4

The main show that Lego release new sets at every year is the Spielwarenmesse fair in Nürnberg (Nuremberg, Germany). If you watch the various forums, especially www.EuroBricks.com, you'll see excited posts like this one about Star Wars around the time of the fair. Lego also announce sets at the New York equivalent show. Models made by fans are usually ...


3

Coming to this late, as I am in the same kind of boat. Options might be different in 2014 due to newer options for models. I'm trying to find a nice few sets that can cover me for building almost anything else. Using rebrickable, adding models to a set and then looking at other Technic models (both official and MOC) will give you an idea of what sort of ...


3

To answer this question, we must first check the accuracy of your observation that "U.S. prices seem to be consistently around 70% of those in Europe given current currency exchange rates." Using data provided by Brickset, which pulls data from the online listings at shop.lego.com, we can compare the prices of sets released in 2014 that are listed with ...


3

Gev already answered the question about availability. LEGO Ideas sets are produced in small quantities. Perhaps this will change in the future as LEGO Ideas is now out of beta testing and was brought in-house by LEGO. The Curiosity is not going to be back unfortunately. I just called LEGO about this a couple of days ago. As far as the Curiosity inventory, ...


3

I think BrickOwl is the best alternative to Bricklink, I placed an order there and it worked as well as on Bricklink. The fact that many sellers on BL also sell on BO. There are only two things that BO can't compete with BL: inventory, and a bit higher price.


3

The LEGO Online Store states that it can deliver to: Your LEGO® order can be shipped direct to you or a friend/relative in select countries within Europe and even to North America and Asia/Pacific. The list of shipping locations includes: I guess they have their reasons for not including Israel in that list - presumably it's either because of ...


2

The EV3 Gyro Sensor now appears to be on "general release" and available in both US and UK stores: http://shop.lego.com/en-GB/EV3-Gyro-Sensor-45505 - these seem to be available in most EU countries the LEGO Shop ships to. You can order the gyro sensor from the UK Lego Education site ...


2

Another important point to note about all of the Parks shops: Whilst the on site are not actually LEGO Store shops - they are (albeit usually well stocked) franchise shops - as such they typically only carry general availability and "Hard to find" LEGO Sets and merchandise - LEGO Store and Shop@Home "Exclusive" items are not available through these stores. ...


2

Sorry to disappoint you sir. But first of all LEGOLAND in Denmark is about 3 hour drive from Copenhagen, I am from Denmark and I would say that the Danish LEGOLAND is not that great, they do not have any really special stuff that you cannot get anywhere else, in fact when I was in Florida LEGOLAND I found that they had a lot more unique stuff then the ...


2

These typically go for several hundred USD at the low end, and can be up to several thousand for the rarer display figures. One way to get an idea of the current market price is to check out the items currently for sale on Bricklink. A search for 'display figure' in the gear category should give you a pretty good idea.


2

Pick-a-brick is a pretty cost effective to get bricks, in my experience. Prices will vary by your locale, of course, but I have one data point. For a 17 EUR PAB cup, I got around 100 EUR worth of bricks using BrickLink's average price. Since the average price is often above the median, and the median is not shown on the page, I instead recalculated using the ...


2

Obviously, if you want to use the train a lot, you will want to use a rechargeable option. You didn't explicitely address this in your question, but even with AAA batteries, you can either use disposable batteries or rechargeable ones. The cost of using disposable batteries can very fast become prohibitive, but rechargeable ones tend to cost more upfront ...


2

I don't recall an official statement, but one story I read said that they made a deal with the original designer to limit production to one run, but that seems almost apocryphal. As for buying the pieces you need, I would think you'd have better luck on Bricklink. It's possible that the PaB on S@H might have all the pieces necessary, but that seems truly ...


2

LUGBULK does allow members to buy things at a reduced cost that is determined by LEGO's production pricing. I know our LUG allows each member to pick a certain number of elements that we want and then vote on the remainder. That way, everyone is guaranteed a certain amount pieces they want. Plus we can choose from the rest of the line-up also. But of ...


1

If you can get to a Lego shop, there is a Pick a Brick wall with mostly large bricks that you buy by the cupful for less per brick than you would pay in most sets. These two sites: http://www.brickbuildr.com/view/pab/ , and http://wallofbricks.com/ show you the current(ish) contents of the Pick a Brick walls around the world, they are updated by fans ...


1

For long-retired products, it may be possible to find scanned images of the stickers online. Then use a high quality color printer to print new decals which you glue to the bricks. The result is not perfect, but often good enough to fool an untrained eye.


1

Brick owl seems to be a nice alternative as well. The interface is well designed and they have a feature built-in that allows you to find the best combo of stores for the parts in your wishlist, then add them all to your cart at once. It even gives you a total + shipping!


1

It depends of the set's inventory parts, I mean pieces. For example, the Hoth Rebel Base from 2007 was only available in stores for 5 months, and if you look at it, it's an amazing set (I have it) So, it depends, and as Joubarc said, there is not a rule for that.


1

My son has a Lego Movie poster on his wall that he got in the "Mega" magazine a few weeks ago. I think it's A2 sized. We're in the UK though (I don't know where you're located) but I'd recommend looking at any magazines in shops to see what they include - some of them are a little expensive for what they are, but they usually bulk them out with free "toys" ...


1

If you subscribe to the Lego Club (availability depends on your location) you will receive the official Lego Magazine and often a free poster is included. The March/April 2014 edition contained a reversible poster with the Lego City theme on one side and the Disney Princess theme on the other side. Occasionally, you may receive promotional Lego posters with ...


1

Yes, BrickLink is by far going to be your best bet if you are looking for specific minifigures. Make sure you create a wanted list with all the minifigs you want, then quire by shop to see which seller(s) have all or most of the minifigures you want. You can save significantly this way on shipping. eBay is not so good for individual minifigures as the ...



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