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29

This image shows the dimentions in LEGO Units. 1 Lego Unit is 1.6mm (the thickness of the plastic). In those units the stud's diameter is 3 (= 4.8mm).


25

The "Extra Large" grey baseplate is 15"/38cm square, with 48 studs to a side. Alternatively, the moulded castle baseplate had a greater volume (with hight), and a base size of 32x48 studs and 6 bricks high (15"x10"/38x25cm) (in other colours as well): Tim offered up the following, also with a base size of 32x48 studs, 6 bricks high (15"x10"/38x25cm) (it ...


16

LDU stands for LDraw Unit - the basic unit of measurement in LDraw, the open standard for LEGO CAD programs, and map to the "Fine" grid setting in applications such as MLCad. Common measurements include: 1 brick width/depth = 20 LDU 1 brick height = 24 LDU 1 plate height = 8 LDU 1 stud diameter = 12 LDU 1 stud height = 4 LDU A ...


14

This image from Brickipedia should sum it up nicely: A plate is exactly one third of a brick in height (3.2 mm as in the diagram). In other words, 3 plates stack to match the height of a brick. This is useful to know if you're short on a certain size of brick, but have enough plates of the same shape and color to cover it in height.


13

Standing The smallest area you can enclose a standing minifig in is just about 4x4x4 2/3 with the roof on: To reach this limit, you need to use the panels and windows to make room for the arms and more importantly the head, which is larger than a 1x1 brick. Seated To enclose a seated minifig in the smallest space, you will need to ensure that you've ...


10

For the short answer, Duplo studs are indeed taller than twice the height of a Lego stud. And don't rely too heavily on measurements you get from ldraw (and not just for Duplo). For a really long-winded history on this... First, note that when I authored the original Duplo parts I never actually measured them with a ruler or calipers, as there was no ...


9

(Note: my HDD crashed recently and until I get that fixed I can't really make LDraw images. I did create one for this beforehand, but it's on the same HDD.) As jfyelle said the solution consists of using one LEGO element which has an odd ldu dimension somewhere. There is such an element, which isn't even new or particularly rare, that is, the Fence 1 x 4 x ...


9

The largest wheels I know are these (I measured 110x63 mm, including tyres), but they are quite rare (only available in one single set): Weels: 22969 "Wheel Technic Racing" Tyres: 32298 "Tyre Power Puller" The wheels itself are not that big, but if you include the tyres, they are really huge: They would probably work really well for an RC car.


8

if you're just counting the basal area, it seems to be the gray 48x48 baseplate:


8

If you go by Volume/Weight. This is heaviest single-element I've ever seen. It's not just plastic but it's one element made and sold by LEGO.


7

A minifigure with legs, torso, and head would be five bricks tall standing or four bricks sitting down. It's also one stud deep and two studs wide (four studs including arms) With the arms and hands extended parallel to the thighs, the arms take roughly two and half studs worth of space from the joint of the arm. The image below show's a diagram of a ...


5

There is another piece with an odd LDU dimension: the 1x1 bracket is 3 LDU thick. Paired with an Erling brick, which has a 4 LDU offset built in, it's a very compact way to create a 1-LDU offset, like psiaki has done here: Then it's just a matter of translating the offset into a gap between bricks using standard bracket pieces like I have done here:


5

The largest wheels I've seen are "Wheel 81.6x15" 2903 To show scale: There are larger ones on the Hailfire Droid but these probably aren't good for your needs:


5

While LEGO uses metric nowadays, you may be interested to know that the bricks they originally copied (and bought the patent for later on) were made in the UK and thus probably used imperial measurements (although dimensions are not specified in the original patent). You may want to search for UK patent 529580 or Kiddicraft to learn more about this. There ...


4

An alternative is the 94.8x44 balloon tires. While they are not as big as the ones elusive suggested, I imagine they are easier to get as they have been in some recent sets. Comparison: Left: 81.6x15 Middle: 94.8x44 balloon Right: 81.6x38 balloon


4

LDUs are synthetic units for LDraw, a lego design software. (I am personally convinced that the correct answer to your question is that there is no way to create a 1 LDU gap and that we are very fortunate to have the Erling brick to create a 2LDU gap.) If you look at the 2 links provided, you'll see that both the Erling and the standard lego brick ...


4

Just measured them myself. Some of the dimensions might be just a little bit off, but I hope this suffices: NXT: Length: 111 mm Width: ~71.7 mm Height: 40 mm (extra 8 mm if you have a rechargeable battery installed) Motor: Length: ~105 mm Width: 40 mm Height: ~45 mm Ultra-sonic Sensor: Length: 44 mm Width: 44 mm Height: 30 mm Generic Sensor: ...


3

The math you're suggesting may work for going straight forward or backward where slipping is limited. For a turn, it will not come close. Even getting the center of rotation of the turning robot will be difficult. The tracks will have to slip. A tracked robot can not turn without those tracks slipping. Differences in friction will alter the turn. More ...


3

this brick has always annoyed me, when sorting my bricks


3

This is not a full answer, but the Free Art and Technology Lab seems to have carefully measured a DUPLO brick as part of the Free Universal Construction Kit. The parts are made available as STL file, for instance http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:15945 - includes DUPLO upper side http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:15924 - includes DUPLO bottom side Maybe ...


3

There is also the Technic Gear Mobile Devastator Wheel, but it's not really suited if you want a realistic car. If you want to build a funny-looking vehicle, however... You could even build a complete vehicle which fits completely inside the radius of two such wheels, so that it can turn on itself when you reverse the polarity. Again, not a car, but super ...


2

@Zhaph : (from my sister's LEGO collection)


2

I don't know where you got that image, but you could always try and print the brick using the dimensions shown. Using the brick (#32316) shown in your example it might be possible to produce a 3D model using the 32316.dat file that's available in the LDraw library. The next problem would be placing the brick in a model and exporting it as a file type that ...


2

Robert Cailliau has summarized how dimensions of LEGO bricks derive from: The base measure 0.8mm (that's where the 1.6mm already mentioned derives from) The play measures 0.1mm (for additional space between pieces) The height of studs 1.8mm It looks like the number as the same as given in other sources, but there is disagreement about the height of a ...


1

A 360 degree turn takes: (width of robot/circumference of wheel) turns, neglecting track thickness, assuming the tracks are at sides if the robot. The length of track doesn't matter. Your robots non-slipping part of the track is traversing a circle of diameter=width of robot. The other parts of the track are sliding across the surface. A longer robot / ...



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