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31

Various people have done this - however most of the links seem to point to a [then defunct] blog by Martin Howard (Randomwraith) from 2004. A more recent, and available, post on this, using newer pieces can be seen here: LEGO Logic by Keshav Saharia Based on a lack of gears and rack and pinion elements, Keshav decided to rebuild the logic gates using ...


24

Hooray, I get to answer a question! This is not a piece for launching missiles. It's actually part of an old steering assembly from some late 80s and 90s Technic sets. Here's what the whole thing looks like: And a view of the piece in question: And an example of how it is meant to be used: The teeth on the outside of the piece help lock it into ...


23

The LEGO Pick A Brick store lists them as connector pegs (or, more simply, pegs) although they are more commonly known as pins in the fan community1. The black ones have added friction for holding things together, while the light gray and beige ones are smoother and allow pieces to rotate, for example tires or beams. 1 BrickLink, Peeron


23

2006 Lego's official position on this technique was explained at Brickfest 2006. Jamie Berard, then a relatively new designer in Billund gave an excellent presentation on why certain techniques are considered "illegal" in official sets. The basics message is that building techniques should: not stress the bricks be suitable for the target audience of the ...


21

Tristan Lostroh did an exhaustive test of both studded beams and stud-less beams with and without connections. Here are his results: Studless beams are better in tension than studded Studded beams are better in transverse than studless Studless beams are stronger in transverse with the pins on the side Connections to other components will fail ...


20

This would push the pins up and down like a normal key would. Here is the basic system. I don't have time to build to whole thing but this resolves the main problem and proves the feasibility. The main problem was to reproduce the pins system with LEGO bricks since each pins needs to have different lengths. Early in this project, I wanted to have a ...


18

I reproduced the problem and got the axle out using a sculpting tool (similar to an awl). It's a sharp metal point made out of hard metal. Soft metal will actually bend (believe me I tried three tools). I insert the point in the space left by the axle groove and pried the axle out. The point of the tool is against the axle while the body of the tools is ...


15

From principles of molding, you want a uniform part thickness throughout if possible. This facilitates plastic flow as well as dimensional stability (you want uniform shrinkage on cooling.) Removing a divot from the underside of a stud serves this purpose in a regular brick. The Technic brick with through holes would have had a large amount of solid ...


14

The regular connector have simple angles which are multiples of 22.5°. #4 is 45°, #3 is 22.5° and #5 is 67.5°. That's pretty boring stuff, but there you go. The 53.5 angle isn't as bizarre as you would think and there's a very good reason for it (and less boring to me, but YMMV). That reason is that it forms a Pythagorean triangle, and specifically the ...


14

The studless have SEVERAL advantages over the studded design especially when you want to include moving parts. Just the clearances between connections is important. Sariel sums it up in his book well. He says there are advantages to both systems (stud-full, for example, are more rigid) but the fact that the stud-less look more realistic and, of course, the ...


12

In my opinion, you don't need to look further than plastic quantity, and thus cost. Take a normal brick or plate (easier) and look inside it. You'll notice that each stud is hollow, but from below. Why? Simply because there's no need to have it full with material as it serves no purpose. It's easy to make the mould that way, it doesn't remove any ...


12

In the UK shop, there are currently two sets: The Unimog U 400 [set:8110] which uses the motorised "compressor" to supply the power (as opposed to the manual sprung pump). And the Tractor with Log Loader [set:8049] which uses the manual pump: The other sets that look like they have piston arms (such as [set:8043]) are actually using "linear ...


12

Yes. The current Mindstorms sets are completely Technic orientated and use the Technic pins (i.e. [part:3673:7]) to connect to the newer Technic Beams (i.e. [part:32316:7]) as well as the original Technic Bricks (i.e. [part:3894:7]) The various different size pins and axles are the way to interchange between these.


12

You probably could use this, which looks exactly like it's the missing part of your puzzle: You'll be interested to know that this part has intitially been proposed by the first four fans (MUPs, for LEGO Mindstorms Users Panel) working on the very first NXT kit and regularly ran into the same problem as yours. A lot of Technic fans now name the part after ...


11

I use a Mindstorms NXT brick and an Android smartphone for my remote controlled tank. The downside is that the NXT motors are slower than the regular Power Functions motors, and connecting PF motors to the NXT brick requires additional components. Personally, I am satisfied with NXT motors and don't bother kludging PF motors. (Yet.) Here is a modular truck ...


10

Most 1×2 (and longer) plates and bricks have a pin at the bottom right in the middle of studs that perfectly fits this hole. Connecting this way gives you half-stud shift.


10

Personally I would go with Arduino (on the car) and an Android phone as the controller (via bluetooth). There's plenty of reference on the web about mixing the two. The main problem is interfacing with non Lego parts (motors, PCB, ...). Luckily, you can find Lego adapter parts in many Robot/Electronic sites. For example at Pololu: ...


10

They are not compatible, the teeth are completely different. Notice that the red old gear has 9 teeth and is the same size1 as a current 24-teeth, as illustrated by below: The axle hole however is compatible, so you could have a construction using both types. 1. Actually, the distance between axles to have two of these red gears mesh is the same as the ...


10

There are a number of Lego Pneumatic sets with airtight tubes, valves and switches which could be put into use with fluids. One is 9641, Pneumatics Add-On Set. Bear in mind that the pneumatics sets can command a much higer price than those sets with a similar number of parts, and buying individual pieces can also get expensive. Have a look at BrickLink to ...


10

If you're after a simple collapsible solution to reach those items just out of reach, you can start with the following setup: You can extend this for quite some way, and use longer bricks or beams throughout if you wish. To finish it off, I'd use a couple of longer bricks with some additional plates on the end to act as fingers, and add some handles (via ...


10

You will need to decide between 3711 Technic Chain Link and 3873 Technic Chain Tread, or possibly use them together. Each link of chain is about 1 cm long and 0.8 cm wide and you can get them in packs of 108 (Chain Link Set Product Code: 2000645) The Chain Tread are wider, but seem to be available only in smaller packs, such as Set # 9938-1: ...


10

If it's your own creation, you should be able to adapt your model to fit the rack you have. One tricky problem I can see is if your construction is built as most studless models are nowadays and features uneven dimensions - which means a 7 rack is indeed easier than a 8. You can of course build something around the old 1x4 rack place but it might get ...


10

Sure looks like one of these: Technic, Steering Gear with 4 Ball Joints, Complete Assembly with Black Base It comes in a handful of sets


10

When your function (such as an extending crane boom) gets to one limit or the other, this clutch gear ratchets instead of binding up the motor and all the gears in between. ETA: Forgot the second question. It has appeared in many sets, most recently the Fairground Mixer.


9

The largest wheels I know are these (I measured 110x63 mm, including tyres), but they are quite rare (only available in one single set): Weels: 22969 "Wheel Technic Racing" Tyres: 32298 "Tyre Power Puller" The wheels itself are not that big, but if you include the tyres, they are really huge: They would probably work really well for an RC car.


8

Funny that you are asking because I just rebuilt my old 4x4 OffRoader (8466) with my son. it's a 4 wheels drive, V8 with a functional 5 speed gearbox (including reverse). and in the truck (with the gearbox cover): Looking at it in action is really good to understand the basics of a car's transmission.


8

there are some lego-models that have a working gearbox built-in like the super street sensation (8448). just take a loot at the building instruction* to see how it works. *page 18, 26, 72-81


8

The first LEGO axles were milky white and were probably made in a different plastic than they are now. Later on, LEGO started making all-black axles when they started doing more serious technic sets. However, the tendancy is now to make sure all difficult technic pieces are "color-coded" so that children can pick them out more easily. As such, nowadays, the ...


8

LEGO have produced an IR Speed Remote Control unit as part of their current "Power Functions" range. This offers: Features 4 RC channels, 2 stop button and 2 direction control switches! Use the jog wheels to control your motor speed! You will also need the receivers as well.


8

It appears from the photo that there may be some "blooming" where the axles have changed color? You say you rinsed them, but I wonder if you noticed whether the axles felt oily or sticky at all beforehand? This would be consistent with the kind of deterioration that is common with Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC), a kind of plastic that was once common in toy ...



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