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3

All 3 of the sets you listed actually use the same type of tracks, they are Technic, Link Tread Wide with Two Pin Holes #57518. In my opinion this type would be your best option for driving a robot for a number of reasons: Since they come as links the tracks can be made any length you want, allowing a lot of flexibility in designing the robot. These are ...


1

It's possible to build a steering system without using a gear rack. Rack and pinion steering is simply one of the easiest ways to translate the rotational motion of a steering wheel to the translational motion needed to adjust the wheels. Here's one example of using tie rods and a knuckle to accomplish steering: That's obviously quite complicated because ...


3

Yes A hex key, being tough metal, is inherently a danger to ABS plastic. Using it to push axles and pop connections will eventually scratch and wear down your parts, something you don't want with technic pieces.


0

I would try to action the switch with a rotating motion directly applied to it; on your picture it seems you're just holding it in place with an idle grey axle and trying to move it with a somewhat clever, but complex, mechanism. You can use a torque gear to prevent the movement from going too far; but there's probably a more elegant solution using a ...


1

I have a small pair of bent-nose needle-nose pliers in with my Lego and use them quite often, generally without damaging anything. That picture is a 150mm set, mine are a "miniature" 80mm set designed for electronics work. One key feature is that the ends of the jaws have little teeth, so they get positive grip on really tiny things. Of course, if you ...


0

Manufacturing the studded beams is significantly more complex and hence more expensive. They have more plastic in them (they weigh more) which also pushes up the cost. But the mould complexity is the real killer. If you look carefully there's a void over the top of the holes in the beam. That means moulds with moving parts, and the more parts the more it ...


5

Despite what it superficially looks like in (for example) Sariel's build videos, having a big pile of parts spread across the table is not the fastest way. Pour the contents of the smaller bags into containers (I use old plastic take-away containers). That way you are looking through a container of blue 3 long pins and red 2-long axles for a 2-long axle, ...


4

Simply use the longest technic shaft you have, and use it to push the #7 shaft out just enough to where you can finish pulling it out with your fingers. Then pull out the long shaft.


4

Actually, the brick separator is a very versatile tool for disassembling Technic. The end of the wedge can be slipped into the slot on the side of several pieces to help pop Technic pins out from behind (I also use it like a screwdriver for aligning Technic pins while building). It can also be used to separate stubborn beam connections. I've also got a 1:6 ...


1

I would recommend the 1:3 light grey cross-axle for popping other axles. It's more versatile than the 1:2 red cross-axle because it doesn't get stuck in the same spot you pushed whatever piece out of. It's also small enough that it's unlikely to bend or break under pressure, which is a necessity for this usage. (I'm not the only one who's bent a big axle on ...


4

No, it would be practically impossible to damage LEGO pneumatic elements by overpressurizing them. It turns out that LEGO pneumatic pumps actually have a very simple "slip" mechanism that prevents overpressurization. Once the pressure reaches about 35-40psi (the exact threshold varies slightly pump by pump) the rubber plunger disk will give way and bend ...


3

You wrote you would like to hear an answer that is more definitive as a guess. I guess then we can accept Sariel as a definitive source, and he writes here: There is no risk of anything blowing up. If you’re using Lego pumps, they will simply lack the power to keep pumping once a critical air pressure is reached. There is a risk, however, that your Lego ...


2

Just to mention there is a book from Klutz "LEGO Crazy Action Contraptions Craft Kit" that might fill in the gap at the lower and smaller side


3

One answer is that TLG actually has done something similar in the past. They used to produce universal sets that were roughly equivalent to the Creative Box that you're referencing. Here's an example: These sets all included lots of basic Technic parts and instructions for 3+ models to get you started building. This is getting into the realm of ...



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