Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

37

SNOT stands for Studs Not On Top and it means building structures where you use hinges or other techniques to change the direction of the bricks, so they are not one on top of the other as it's done traditionally. This is a very simple example of SNOT: The technique is particularly useful for spaceships and even some LEGO sets rely on it, for example, ...


27

I definitely know them as the headlight brick, and they look like this: HoMa's world of bricks has a nice page dedicated to this brick! http://www.holgermatthes.de/bricks/en/lampenstein.php LEGO's Pick a Brick lists this as an "Angular Brick 1x1", Design ID 4070 (equivalent to the piece/part id).


27

MOC stands for "My Own Creation". MOC My Own Creation. Any LEGO creation designed and built by a LEGO fan without instructions. Generally pronounced “mock.”* Found at this Lego glossary. Brickipedia's version from their own glossary: MOC - My Own Creation, a fan- made LEGO model *A side note: There may be some LEGO fans who pronounce ...


18

Around 2004 (if I remember correctly) LEGO changed the grey and dark grey colors. The colors before the change were the original grey colors which were in use from their introduction. They were somewhat warmer than the colors today, which was perceived as looking faded, though it had nothing to do with aging. Part of the problem was that the competition ...


17

That is a Vehicle, Mudguard 2 x 4 with Arch Studded (and a darn hard part to figure out at that).


16

LDU stands for LDraw Unit - the basic unit of measurement in LDraw, the open standard for LEGO CAD programs, and map to the "Fine" grid setting in applications such as MLCad. Common measurements include: 1 brick width/depth = 20 LDU 1 brick height = 24 LDU 1 plate height = 8 LDU 1 stud diameter = 12 LDU 1 stud height = 4 LDU A ...


15

The Erling Brick: named by the LEGO Designer Erling Dideriksen, who invented this element in 1979.


15

It refers to building items at a much smaller scale than the usual "mini-fig" scale. For example the "Micro" Star Destroyer: 4492 Mini Star Destroyer Edit to add: Officially however, when bought as a set they are usually referred to as "Mini-scale".


15

It's been worked out by multiple groups who decided on different systems. The disagreement is based on what information was publicly available from the Lego Group at the time, what pieces had been manufactured up to that point, and what features the category authors thought were salient. To really appreciate the magnitude of the problem, just try ...


15

SNIR is the abbreviation for "Studs Not In a Row" - almost self-explaining, but for more information, take a look at this small article. [...] very useful on walls and other things. In Lego, studs (nubs, dots, etc.) are in a row, and a straight one. Using SNIR makes studs be in zigzags or diagonal lines. [...]


13

The Brick Blogger describes in detail how the LUGBULKS system works. The LUGBULK program debuted in 2009 and still operates as a pilot program for LEGO. LEGO realizes that AFOLs are the ones that make communities aware of LEGO in a wide range of venues that LEGO does not have the time or resources to reach. Therefore, supplying these AFOLs with ...


12

AFOL stands for "Adult Fan Of LEGO". From an unofficial LEGO acronym glossary: AFOL Adult Fan of LEGO. The most common term used to refer to LEGO fans who are adults. Generally pronounced to rhyme with “hay-foal”. Or from Brickipedia's glossary (also unofficial): AFOL - Adult Fan Of LEGO


10

I believe that in this context DTC means direct to consumer. These sets are typically only available directly from TLG either via online orders from LEGO S@H or from LEGO retail stores. Here's the original source and discussion for the DTC set that you mentioned and several others: http://www.brickset.com/news/article/?ID=2900


10

The two biggest themes to be called "classic" are "classic space" and "classic castle" and refer to the period when these themes were first introduced. Brickset subthemes reflect this: Classic Castle covers the first yellow castle and accessories, from 1978 to 1983. I'd tend to include the new series from 1984 myself, since there wasn't much to speak of ...


10

Chapter 1, Page 4, The Unofficial LEGO Builder's Guide: The tube is the other half of the mechanism that helps bricks stick together. Tubes capture the studs so that you can join LEGO elements and know they won't fall apart.


9

Microscale is not just a technique, it's an artform: blog explaining it and a few showcases a very nice example


8

Yes, it does exist and it is indeed a logistical nightmare, but at least it does exist. From what I understand from the participation from the LUG I'm a member of, all participants must provide their data to LEGO and must agree not to resell parts they buy. The participants don't buy things on their own; rather, the club is responsible to select elements ...


7

Bricklink (at the time of writing) has 5 catalog items using the term 'stud receptacle'.


7

It's called a brick. This may sound like a weird or mocking answer, but when you think about it, it does make sense. The 2x4 brick the most iconic brick of them all, the one which has started it all. The one for which the first patent has been issued in 1958. The book "50 Years of the LEGO brick" contains 6 of them, and the number of permutation for these ...


7

From the official EV3 FAQ: What does EV3 stand for? This is the third generation of the LEGO MINDSTORMS platform and the "EV" stands for evolution, hence EV3.


7

At some point, LEGO changed three of its staple colors: light gray, dark gray and brown. This was but the latest on a long series of traumatic changes imposed by the Danish company, and some fans couldn't stand it any more. While some vowed to never touch LEGO again and some didn't really care, the vast majority, who knew they couldn't fight their ...


7

A cheese slope resembles a chunk of cheese from a cheese wheel. They happen to also be the perfect size for minifigures to interact with: ‘Lego Cheese Farm’ by AIatariel, http://www.flickr.com/photos/alatariel1181/10582728886/


6

Mini style {used in LEGO sets and by collectors, not Miniland} Mini scale/style is typically much smaller than normal LEGO. In Mini scale/style, figures are formed with 2-3 blocks. Mini scale/style {if I remember correctly} didn't gain popularity until recently. It's so far been popularly used in the LEGO Architecture sets, and in a few others of common ...


5

i'm calling those things "fenders" (don't know the "official" name, too). EDIT: if found wheel arch 2x4 in the LEGO-shop. this isn't exactly what you were looking for, but looks like a "newer version" - so maybe we should call those pieces "wheel arches" in the future.


5

By considering a "somehow usual amongst fans" instead of "official" position (see my comment), I have heard some fans who simply "verbed" the acronym MOC, as in, "I MOC'ed for 3 hours straight yesterday". You could probably do the same with LEGO itself, but that would be frowned upon as LEGO is supposed to be used as an adjective and so on. (When I was a ...


5

I just use "Build". As in: "I'm going to go build" I'm unaware of any official term. Even "MOC" isn't official in any way other than just a term a lot of people use.


5

For an official position, you may want to check older LEGO catalogues or instructions to see if they're naming things, and how. While you can find some names for complete elements in, for example, service parts catalogues, I don't think you'll find much for specific subparts. Given the 1958 patent illustration, it's likely the patent itself named subparts, ...


5

The bumpy-things on the top of a brick are called studs. At the bottom of the brick, the holes that the studs go into are called tubes. As far as I know, there are no parts of a brick called nibbles or knobs.


5

I've heard variations on "Big Ugly Rock PieceS". However, I've also seen the term used to describe any large piece that the builder thinks has little reusable value due to its shape being pretty specific to a certain use. Obviously the mountain pieces are built to look like pieces of rock. But there's also some tower elements in the Harry Potter sets that ...


4

I've seen it referred to as a "Rory" in brictionaries. I usually refer to it as just brick.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible