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21

A 1x1x5 brick has enough leverage to remove most jumper plates. Apply pressure to the top of the brick and pull or push away from the length of the jumper plate. Even a 1x1 brick works in certain cramped places, although It doesn't provide as much leverage.


16

I reproduced the problem and got the axle out using a sculpting tool (similar to an awl). It's a sharp metal point made out of hard metal. Soft metal will actually bend (believe me I tried three tools). I insert the point in the space left by the axle groove and pried the axle out. The point of the tool is against the axle while the body of the tools is ...


16

If the helmet were jammed head-down, you can use a needle-nose pliers to grasp the edge of the tube in the inside of the racing helmet, as shown, and then pull them apart. You may need to twist them apart as you pull. In your case, since the helmet is jammed head-up, you need a way to push it out from the bottom. I suggest drilling a small hole through ...


13

LEGO recommend using a mild detergent in water to clean your bricks, or a mild bleach: We recommend that you clean or wash your LEGO parts only by hand at max. 40°C or 104 degrees (F) Fahrenheit. Higher temperatures may affect the quality of the LEGO parts. You can add a mild detergent to the water, followed by rinsing with clear water. Please don't put ...


13

I'll try to show how I'd do this using a 2x12 plate (or something similar). Imagine you're looking at it from the side: _n_n_n_n_n_n_n_n_n_n_n_n_ --> Pull | narrow, long plate _n_ | jumper plate _n_n_n_n_n_n_ | baseplate n = stud Just attach a plate or brick to the top of ...


11

I know of no desktop applications that have functionality like Rebrickable, but an API has recently been released which would enable any applications to integrate with the site and display this kind of information. I know of one such application currently being developed but not ready for release yet. disclaimer: I created Rebrickable.


11

There's the great LEGO Brick Separator that can be bought in the LEGO Online Shop: i love this thing, it's just great if you want to take care of your nails and teeth.


9

Or you could use, guess what, a new brick separator: I just noticed this one appearing on BrickLink and have no idea in what set it will come out, or if it will be sold separately, or if it will work with jumpers.


8

Lego Digital Designer (~140mb, Mac and PC) is quite useful for creating 3D designs. I haven't personally used it that much but it is quite a powerful tool. It will tell you the number of bricks used in a model as well. At a pinch, MS Paint (pixel-based), Google Sketchup (find some templates for bricks) and Minecraft could even be used for planing builds.


8

Compressed air, commonly used for electronic equipment. Sold in cans at office and electronic stores, used to blow away dust and other small particles away. A paint brush is cheaper but can clear dust from a more localised area. It helps to have a brand new brush that has never been used. I use compressed air and paint brushes interchangeably when taking ...


7

According to the LEGO Cutomer Service (click "Knowledge Base > How do I sanitize or wash my LEGO elements?"): We recommend that you clean or wash your LEGO parts only by hand at max. 40°C or 104 degrees (F) Fahrenheit. Higher temperatures may affect the quality of the LEGO parts. You can add a mild detergent to the water, followed by rinsing with clear ...


6

I found a few ways to convert a 3D model into a Lego sculpture. The first is a program called Dolphin which you can download here. It works very well, as you can see in this image of Yoshi: The downside to this program is that it only runs on Macs, and the output format is a series of images, one for each layer. So you can't import it into MLCAD or your ...


5

Use the new Jumper Tile 2.0 instead! Easier to remove! Comes in many1 colors2! Advanced features3! Comes in many colours4! Lighter than the old, clumsy version! Don't wait, contact your closest LEGO reseller to upgrade your collection of obsolete jumpers to new, shiny ones! 1. Three. 2. U.S. version only. 3. The same as Jumper 1.0, plus Easier removal 4. ...


4

The online consensus on this question seems to be using LDraw, and progressively create the model while saving the steps (like this tutorial explains). However, I remember an other way, but I can't put .. oh wait, it was using MLCad.


4

In most cases it's best to to pry a brick by it's length (the bricks longest side). The base of the hinge brick can be removed with a crowbar. The crowbar brick is fairly new and exists only in a few sets but I consider it to be the most versatile. There are many other minifig utensils that can be helpful in removing different types of bricks: ...


3

Short of damaging the parts (which oddTodd nicely documented, I'd tend to try to see if the part can't be removed by suction; although I'm not sure how you could generate enough. Trying to inject a fluid underneath (with sufficient pressure) might do the trick too; that's what doctors do when dealing with clogged ears (usually with a sort of big syringe). ...


3

I have polished Lego to restore the shine. Bite marks cannot be removed, so don't bother. Most scratches can either be removed or made much less noticable. Be careful not to be too vigourous in your polishing as the sharp, crisp clean edges of a pristine brick can easily be rounded by an over-zealous polisher. I use a simple buffing wheel w/ a felt (or is it ...


2

Whatever you do, don't put them in a bath along with small children. It could be that the bathplug gets lifted and then a piece gets sucked into the plug hole. With that piece blocking your ability to put the plug back in the hole, more pieces will be sucked in. Panic will ensue. Small pieces will be swept down the drain, large pieces will continue ...


2

LPub is a program designed specifically to produce step-by-step construction documentation from LDraw files. I haven't tried it myself (it's Windows-only) but I believe most of the fan-created instructions out there are made with it. Edit: As Retracile notes in his answer to a similar question there is a newer version, LPub 4, which also supports Mac.


2

One option that may minimize damage to the axle would be to find a mini chuck (left) or micro chuck (right) (i.e. a very small chuck, like a pin chuck) with 4 collet prongs that stick out far enough from the nose cap and are small enough to insert between the rim of the hole and the axle: Then you could tighten it down so the 4 prongs grip the cross ...


2

A pair of needle nose pliers might just do the trick, or some sturdy tweezers - however it might leave some scratches on the axle (thus limiting the no-damaging). I assume there's another 2 axle in the the other side stopping the use of a wooden toothpick or similar pushing it through from the other end? The joiner has an inner lip, but is hollow if I ...


2

buy a jolly rancher at your local gas station. screw in a long thin screw to a small portion of the jolly rancher, small enough to fit in the garbage can without touching any of the sides. wet the end of the jolly rancher and set it on the plastic helmet in the garbage can. wait a day for it to dry, then pull the helmet out, and soak it in water to ...


1

Thank you all for your answers. Now I must share the solution my 13 year old arrived at. I found two scratched elements and the pocketknife that pried them apart on my computer desk this morning. This was definitely NOT the best way to get a helmet out of a garbage can as both elements were damaged in the process, but the helmet (which now looks like it was ...


1

As far as a desktop app for inventorying pieces, I personally use Brickstore as suggested by @Superkalle. Although I use it primarily for preparing Bricklink orders rather than a catalogue of my spare parts and/or sets. Should you be interested in an alternative that may be more suited to keeping track of pieces you own, there is 'Parts Catalog' from Bong ...


1

For difficult, stubborn dirt and er, stuff, in corners and hard to reach places, I use wooden tooth picks. They're also particularly good for getting dirt from between the letters of the Lego logo on studs. Also, cocktail sticks.


1

Some years ago I picked up some second hand lego and duplo for the kids that was very dirty and grubby and in a general condition that you would not want your kids playing with. The best method I found was to put the items in the bathtub (With the exception of very small pieces that will disappear down the plughole - Put them in a bowl) and spray them with ...


1

I use an ultrasonic cleaner, with either just water or a little washing up liquid. I have also used dishwasher tablets, but this can leave residue on the elements which kinda defeats the purpose of the exercise. I use cold water because the ultrasonic bath heats the water anyway. The benefit of the cleaner is it can clean all nooks and crannies without ...



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