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20

Here is an approximation of the bridge that appears on the cover of the catalog pictured above. Unlike the version in the picture, this model uses bracket pieces to attach the arched section to the rail bed. All the pieces in this build were available prior to 1994. The arches are decorative and do not really contribute to the strength of the bridge. This ...


13

If you opt for an older system which isn't produced anymore, it's going to be very hard for you to reach a decent collection and maintain it. Even 9v which was only recently been discontinued will be hard to find, especially straight tracks. Also, 9V points were not automated, so if you really want automated points, you'll have to go back to 12v, which is ...


13

The larger hole is present in older 9V track as well: I've never actually done this, but I've always assumed that the hole is there so that the track can be screwed or nailed down if desired to create a semi-permanent layout. This is common practice with traditional model railroad track:


12

What could be considered a safe limit that motors can endure for an extended period of time? Their rated voltage. Motors are designed to operate at their rated voltage indefinitely, or until they wear out, whichever comes first. Exceeding this voltage means you shorten the life of the motor. Your big enemy is heat. At some point, the amount of ...


11

With the exception of evergreen themes like CITY and Duplo, it's not easy to predict when sets are released. Based on trends of the last 11 years, I've included the last 20 train sets that have been released in a table: At least one train set has been released each year apart from the year 2008. The table marks an average of 1.66 train sets per year. It's ...


11

I'd say that an initial HO scale set was probably cheaper than a LEGO version, although a direct comparison isn't easy, and it can rapidly get out of hand once you start adding more elements in. Initial Purchases The closest I can find is probably comparing 7939 LEGO Cargo Train, which is currently selling in the LEGO shop for £130: With something like ...


10

5300 and 10153 are from the former 9V train system and drew power from the metal tracks. They were controlled using a transformer attached to the tracks. 88002 runs on battery power from an onboard battery box. Trains with this kind of motor can run at a set speed, or can be controlled by adding IR remote controllers. Regarding compatibility, the 5300 and ...


10

I'm not sure about LEGO, but Märklin, a company that specialized in building train models used simple stainless steel since 1982, chances are that LEGO did the same: Stainless steel is relatively cheap It doesn't oxidize (as the name implies) The electrical charateristics aren't good, but you don't need a very good (and expensive) material like copper for ...


10

The red car that you mentioned is Mail Van (7820). There are a number of other trains in the picture including: 7730 - Goods train (the locomotive doesn't seem to be visible) 7710 - Push-Along Passenger Steam Train (just the cars) 7750 - Steam Engine with Tender (pulling the cars from 7710) 7814 - Crane Wagon 7760 - Diesel Shunter Locomotive ...


9

According to the product description on the LEGO® webn site, the LEGO® Power Functions Train Motor 88002, can be used to motorise the Western Train Chase. The train wheels normally fit directly to this motor, so I'm sure that this train can be used on normal LEGO® tracks. Looking at the instructions for both the Red Cargo Train and the Western Train Chase, ...


9

There is a pure way of changing the points at a track. It requires as few pieces as you like: a motor and two technic beam/bricks. This video demonstrates the principles of point changing with a NXT motor and will work with PF and RCX. You can use Mindstorms to program the events that trigger the points to change, it will cost you extra but there are ...


9

Since your question seems to be more about what is possible with LEGO, and not really layout examples, I'll focus on what LEGO trains can do. Track Features You can do most things that you can do with traditional model railroads using LEGO trains. This includes cross track, bridges, switches, and inclines. Cross track As far as I know, this was never ...


8

The answer is kind of. I own the Emerald Night and a bunch of Thomas Duplo track. The wheelbase of the Emerald Night is wide enough that the "rails" fit inside the wheels. In fact, the passenger car fits perfectly on the track. Unfortunately, neither the engine nor the tender fit as well, due to the fact that both have pieces on the bottom that are too ...


8

I say this as having been a model railroader (http://zoorail.wordpress.com) for more than 10 years. You will never get the level of detail, scale or even perhaps value with Lego railroad sets as compared to normal model railroading but I just bought two Lego Train sets 7939 and 3677 and was blown away by the care that has not only gone into how they look but ...


7

It uses train wheels which means it should work on Lego track. Sources: Bricklink set inventory LEGO Building Instructions lookup


7

The strict minimum you need for PF motorization is: Tracks. Sounds obvious, but don't forget these. Nope, there are none with the Maersk train. A PF train motor A PF battery box (plus 6 AAA batteries) Now, as oezi says, it's a bit senseless to have a train which you can't control. Well, you can control it, but it's limited to switching it on and off (if ...


7

Here you go: http://goichot.free.fr/lego/7822/8.JPG Have been looking myself for hours as I have two 7822 sets but no box...


7

I've wanted to do something similar since I took part in a public event last year and we had trains running continuously on separate little ovals. My ambition was to have two stations, each with some switches, and run one train at a time between them and switch it to an empty track where it would stop. Since I already had two RCXs, my solution was to place ...


7

It appears to be Electric, Train Motor 12V Modern.


6

If the motors are far apart, you could simply connect them both to the same receiver using some extension cables. To the best of my knowledge, there is no problem connecting two motors on the same input of one IR receiver. If you're using Technic motors instead of train motors, as Zhaph said, you'll probably want to have them coupled through a differential ...


6

These light fit in a regular Technic hole, and thus have the same diameter as a stud. I would recommend fitting them in the so-called "Erling" brick; after all, one of its regular (aka "boring") names is "Brick, 1 x 1 with headlight": . The only problem you'll have is that the light extends quite a bit at the back, but you can easily solve that by using a ...


6

One elegant solution is to use pneumatic elements, as a small pneumatic pump is enough to move the lever. If you're lazy to figure out how, you can buy a kit from a fan which will allow you to control 2 points (you'll need one more pump to generate the pressure). With the included instructions, you can build more controls if you have the parts, or simply buy ...


6

LEGO trains are primarily toys, and the recent ones aren't even using metallic rails. As such, they're usually considered ill-suited for automation purposes. That doesn't mean it's impossible, but it'll prove challenging. In any case, you'll definitely need some computing, so it's good that it's OK with you. For trains themselves, sticking to available ...


6

You can absolutely run RC and PF trains on 12V track. You can leave out the center conducting rail since it won't be delivering any power to the train, unless you are planning to run both 12V and remote trains. The main LEGO train sets have all used the same rail gauge, which is the main thing that matters. If you'd like to use both your 12V track and the ...


6

With a bit of trigonometry and some observation we can estimate a theoretical limit to the maximum length. I assume you are looking for the maximum length that would run on the sharpest possible curve, which appears to be one made with flexible track. By observing this photo of 52 flex track pieces arranged in a circle, we can estimate that each piece can ...


6

Mathematically, the largest driver wheel you can buy for LEGO is Big Ben's XL driver, with a diameter of 36.8mm. To reach 10 mph, that wheel will have to spin: 36.8 mm diameter -> 115.6 mm circumference -> 7.2 x 10^-5 mi/revolution -> 2320 RPM (!!) This means that you have to gear up a motor to run at 2320 RPM. An XL PF motor with no load spins at about ...


5

The transformer can be omitted, if you find a suitable, cheaper one. Take a look at this question for more information about the exact requirements. I don't think the other parts can be omitted, as... A motor clearly is required to motorize something (#88002) A motor won't work without a battery (#8878) Something motorized that can't be controlled is ...


5

The "My Own Train" series only lasted from 2001 - 2004, so it had a relatively short life span. For the most part, they were very nice sets with rich details. It most likely didn't resonate with collectors since the trains were available in various different colors, with or without a tender — this made it prohibitively expensive to own the collection since ...


5

Well, obviously one way to measure that would be empirically - you have the tracks, you have the baseplates... As for the maths, let's see... a full circle of these tracks has a diameter of 5 straight tracks as measured from the centre of the sleepers, that translates to 80 studs. The radius is 40 studs, or 800 ldu. The outer, ridged track, is 2 to 3 studs ...


5

It is designed to handle curves that are found on CITY track. Here is the detail from middle car. There is tongue and groove that allows the middle wheels to slide left and right to enable curves. I will post a video of a powered train pushing it, if needed.



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