Hot answers tagged

14

According to data collected from Brickset, the total MSRP of all Star Wars sets to date is $18,933.76 USD. This includes a total of 508 sets. I simply used the CSV export feature on Brickset to put this together. Here's the raw data if you'd like to explore it further: https://gist.github.com/jncraton/68beb88e6027d9321373


10

You probably came across BrickLink. They sell pretty much anything LEGO related, including original boxes and instruction books.


8

the less sets there are available, the better the chances of a rising price. this implies the sets that will get more expensive with time are: sets that are out of production sets that are expensive when they come out (> less sales) very big sets (expensive > less sales) licensed sets like harry potter or starwars (short production-time > less sales / ...


7

Generally speaking, yes. But there are many factors that determine how a given set will be priced over the years. Sets that have rare, more sought after pieces tend to cost more (think monorails), so if you'd happen to have a MISB monorail set you'd be rich. On the other hand, TLG can inadvertently mess with any investment plan by launching sets with similar ...


7

If it's a newer set, missing instructions will usually just knock a few dollars off the price, even for larger sets. There are usually enough adult fans buying sets for parts that it's easy to pickup cheap instructions on Bricklink. For example, instructions for the new Millennium Falcon can be purchased for less than a dollar in new condition on Bricklink. ...


5

Given the quality of LEGO bricks, I would argue that an original box filled with the correct amount of the correct bricks from the same time period as the box is INDISTINGUISHABLE from an opened box containing the original bricks after use, and as such I would recommend you continue your effort. Just make sure that the bricks are indeed from the correct ...


5

This isn't an easy one: collections can vary considerably in value according to the rarity and desirability of their component parts. There are several approaches you can take to valuing a collection, but it really depends on how much work you're prepared to put in. Of course, the only true indicator of anything is the amount that someone is prepared to pay ...


5

Not sure about several years, but Brickpicker covers one full year. Here are the stats for the Green Grocer, for example: Or the ones for the UCS Millenium Falcon: And so on, you get the idea. They have more and other stats, too — e.g. the following quick overview for every set: They pull their data from eBay, through some ...


4

I'm not familiar with any tools that do this with eBay or Bricklink price histories. I'm pretty sure that Bricklink removes all data older than 6 months, so if this information is available, it would have to come from a third party who scraped it from the site. I have used a tool called Tracktor to look at Amazon price histories for LEGO sets. Sadly, this ...


4

These typically go for several hundred USD at the low end, and can be up to several thousand for the rarer display figures. One way to get an idea of the current market price is to check out the items currently for sale on Bricklink. A search for 'display figure' in the gear category should give you a pretty good idea.


3

The value of the set is indeed greater if it comes with instructions (and even greater when the set comes with a box, but the increase in value is not as big as with the instructions). Especially with older, desired sets, a lack of instructions is sometimes a sign of a BrickLinked set (a set built from a collection of pieces bought from BrickLink stores), ...


2

While this may not help you ascertain the value of someone else's collection you intend to buy or make an offer on, I'll add this for others who may want to know what their own collection is worth - using the Peeron website (www.peeron.com), you can work out the RRP of your own collection. Simply enter the set numbers into their database and Peeron will ...


2

If I were you, I would start by looking at the price the full set is selling because I have been surprised recently to see box I was expecting to be vintage treasures selling at very reasonable prices...


1

If the set was truly exclusive, the price is subjective. Chrome-colored stormtrooper minifigures were given out at toys-r-us exclusively for a month or so, and depending on the buyer and seller, the transactions can constitute a trade, a dollar, or anywhere up to 30$. I would suggest taking the advice of PsyLawn and getting it out onto the market if you ...


1

My answer to this kind of question is always "it's worth exactly as much as someone is willing to give you for it." That said, one could look up prices on BrickLink (assuming there are any for sale there) and go from there. Failing that, put them on eBay with a reserve/starting bid of whatever minimum amount would make it ok for you to part with them.


1

I have been making a list of these over the past few months. I have about 43 and I think that another 50 or so exists. You can see the full list here. http://www.minifigpriceguide.com/MAXIFIGS.0.html I think that these figures generally go for between 400 - 1500 depending on the character. The last Spiderman Doc Ock combo that I saw went for around 3000.



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