567 reputation
318
bio website ideas.lego.com/projects/39075
location Europe, GMT+1
age 35
visits member for 3 years
seen Oct 21 at 14:36

Web developer. Piano player. Mod on two SE sites. Came out of my Dark Ages around 2009. Now collecting as many parts in as many different colors as humanly possible.

Oh, and I have a LEGO Ideas project. Vote for it if you wish, spread the word if you can. Thank you.


Dec
28
comment Known quality control issue with 10234 Sydney Opera House?
In six years of collecting vigorously I've had missing parts, wrong parts, miscolored parts, broken parts. As your collection is growing, you will inevitably bump into these issues. Not a biggie. TLG's support is spectacular, and there's an easy-to-use form on their website just for such cases.
Dec
24
comment What is the “LEGO Master Builder Academy”?
They'll be bringing the line over to Germany soon. I recently participated in translating the instructions for three kits, and other accompanying materials, from English into German.
May
21
comment Technic 8071 assembly problem
I have this set and didn't encounter any problems. Not at this step, not at any other. (Unlike with easily a dozen other sets, where the instructions were wrong, in point of fact, in all kinds of ways and for all kinds of reasons, so I know LEGO aren't impeccable.) And everything was functioning properly when it was assembled. Sadly I've long disassembled it, so I don't even know what all these gears did anymore. And of course I don't remember by heart if my instructions actually looked the same as in the image above, so I guess I will have to check that to be completely sure.
May
18
comment Why are Lego sets put in such big boxes?
More to the point, though, downsizing is not a term that applies in the first place. Downsizing, by (any) definition, does not describe a status quo; it only describes a change. Like, taking the Town Hall that has 2800 parts, and then silently reducing it to 2300 parts, without changing the package size. That simply does not happen with LEGO. Also, upon closer examination you will find that all the typical reasons for downsizing listed in your answer do not actually apply to LEGO as much as you make it sound, and some do not apply at all, in point of fact.
May
18
comment Why are Lego sets put in such big boxes?
Sorry, this is hogwash. You take one buzzword, downsizing, and then you exaggerate everything about it out of all proportion. The bottles example is utter nonsense, and the "tens of millions pounds" is probably the most striking instance of something you only just invented on the spot, but it's by far not the only one. The whole answer reads like pure speculation assembled out of thin air as you go along. I'd suggest to drastically tone it down, providing references for all the egregious claims, and going away with the claims you cannot prove.
May
17
comment Any reasons for the introduction of the new-style raised arch?
So yeah. If you can add the 2×4×2/3 slopes to the answer, mentioning that they were released at the same time as the arch, I will accept. In fact I can edit that info in myself, if that's too much hassle for you.
May
17
comment Which resolution is necessary to print bricks with a 3D printer?
I don't understand the question. TLG have done tons of research on this, and they are a business so they don't want to be wasting money. So if they settled for the tolerance of 10 micrometers, then a tolerance of 100 micrometers is obviously not enough. Simple as that.
May
15
comment Why are Lego sets put in such big boxes?
@Joubarc that is an interesting twist, and originally that may well have been the case, but right now that reason is as bogus as any other. The Town Hall is actually smaller than its picture on the package. Same for the VW Camper Van. And the R2-D2 on the package is almost twice its actual size — in one direction, but we are talking about a 3D model, so you are led to believe it would be 8 times larger overall. I lost count of how many people were underwhelmed by my R2-D2 after having seen the package. And these are not the only sets like that, the list goes on.
May
10
comment Any reasons for the introduction of the new-style raised arch?
Ah, but of course we also have the Slope, Curved 2×4×2/3 No Studs, with and without bottom tubes, which got introduced in 2009 and 2008, respectively. Still not a combination that I have seen used anywhere, but at least that's now a whole system of (at least) four parts, and the years start to make sense now. And of course TLG can always build upon this to introduce more parts in the future. Really interesting. Still, going by the year, the 2×4×2/3 slopes must be the actual answer.
May
10
comment Any reasons for the introduction of the new-style raised arch?
This is fascinating. It never occurred to me to even check this combination. Unlike with 6091 and 6005, which form a useful structure together, this combo here is obviously useless other than for a wall pattern. Most importantly, I first got the slope in Flo’s V8 Cafe, which was introduced only last year where I live, or in 2011 according to BrickLink. In other words, TLG held back the complement to the new raised arch a whopping two or three years. Why that would be, escapes me.
May
9
comment Any reasons for the introduction of the new-style raised arch?
@Voitcus: yes, it is empty as well. In fact if you look at them from the bottom at a straight angle, the two parts look absolutely identical.
May
9
comment Any reasons for the introduction of the new-style raised arch?
Nope, that's the joke. The recess is only 2/3 of a plate high (or 2/9 of a brick). So the plate sticks out. And you are right that the studs don't touch the arch, so the plate sticks out and doesn't stay in place.