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location Poland
age 37
visits member for 1 year, 6 months
seen Jul 3 at 19:50

A Lego fact:

More than 400 billion Lego bricks have been produced since 1958. There are about 62 Lego bricks per person of the Earth's population.


Aug
22
comment Old Lego movies
Thank you for your answer (I vote up for try and providing interesting link). Unfortunately, that's not I'm asking for. The movies were made by Lego in 1980s. There were absolutely no minifigures -- characters were made from "normal" bricks (they were larger of course).
Aug
1
comment How can I preserve opened Lego packages?
I was asking about packages (boxes), not bricks
Jul
9
comment Why are there “unique” characters in many sets?
That makes sense! I accept your answer :)
Jun
4
comment Building a full-size lamp using Lego bricks
Seems when the lamp falls down of your desk, you can't "repair" it manually but need to send it to the customer service ;-)
May
19
comment Why are Lego sets put in such big boxes?
I think that trejder's point of view is ok (not because I'm a Pole too :-) ), but in Josh's answer in fact there is the same thing, but less about this "manipulation stuff". I think TLG is not "the only honest (big) company in the world" and is manipulating its customers as any other.
May
16
comment Why are Lego sets put in such big boxes?
That's reasonable, I was thinking about this, too.
May
10
comment Why are Lego sets put in such big boxes?
That's the reasonable answer, but when I open the box and see just two small bags of parts... Disappointing! But maybe I am not the typical customer :)
May
10
comment Any reasons for the introduction of the new-style raised arch?
If you mean "cost reduction" by using less plastic, I can't agree with you. I suppose this brick is not very often and less material here seems nothing. However, perhaps RegDwight could compare weights of the two bricks? I'm pretty sure it's not more than 1-2 grams, and as I asked in another question it seems there are larger possibilities to reduce production costs.
May
9
comment Why are Lego sets put in such big boxes?
Thanks for the info, +1 for you. As you've written, this problem is seen by the Lego Group. I think making the parts move is making them "work" in worse conditions, normally it is solved by some foam or any other flexible material.
May
9
comment Any reasons for the introduction of the new-style raised arch?
If I remember correctly, the old arch (the right one) is empty inside, so if it's placed on another brick the studs would go inside. Is the new one also empty?
Apr
23
comment Old Lego movies
@Joubarc Can be. I remember there was also something like morphing plane.
Apr
23
comment Why are there “unique” characters in many sets?
@Joubarc You need to have (at least) two of them. If you'd had one, it couldn't "rule THEM all" :) But it can be a spare part
Apr
23
comment Why are there “unique” characters in many sets?
Well, the marketing point of view is now clear. But somewhat it is not good for me. If I bought the guy you put on the 1st picture, it's ok, there can be two, if I get another one. But if I have two Darth Vaders one is completely useless. I'd like eg. a clone trooper instead, that's always not enough of them. My policy (I have no marketing experience -- that's why I ask) would be to put main characters in small sets and minor in the larger ones. Poor children would buy smaller, while rich -- smaller and larger. Thanks for the answer.
Apr
23
comment Is it legal to sell your mocs?
Are you sure it is not legal to say "it's made of Lego(r) bricks"? If I make a table, I can (I think) say it's made of wood, or that building is made of SuperConcrete Ltd.'s concrete and so on.