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What kind of software can I use to design LEGO MOCs? I hear the LDD is not so good to use so is there alternative software I can use?

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A popular alternative is stud.io, provided by Bricklink.

Another possibility mentioned by Alex in the comments is LDCad.

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    Just to add to this, stud.io is the typical go-to software these days. LDD is (in my opinion) simpler to use, but has pretty much been abandoned by Lego at this point. Both softwares are liable to change now that Lego owns BrickLink. – MindS1 Dec 1 '19 at 19:51
  • thank you for your answer! do you know if it is possible also to work in stud.io with other 3d-files or only with bricks that are pre-integrated? So if i would have designed new bricks could i use them too? – fabian Dec 2 '19 at 8:42
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    I would suggest adding LDCad as an option. It was a go to software prior Stud.io for those who prefer LDraw parts. However it is still quite good. Although might be preffered by people with more challenging requirements. – Alex Dec 2 '19 at 13:22
  • @fabian I don't know if stud.io supports custom pieces, but LDraw certainly does. – zovits Dec 2 '19 at 13:47
  • I generally agree with both Alex and MindS1, but overall, I think the initial question might fall into a realm of too many varied opinions to be able to choose just one program. If someone was building a shed in real life, how can someone say that the best tool to use is a hammer? How does one cut wood with a hammer? how does one strike nails with a saw? I've used LDD for years, so LDD is my main go to, but I use other software also to perform tasks LDD can't do. I think the original question could be re-worded differently by asking, "What program do you use, and most importantly explain why? – Rin Rio-Oki Dec 2 '19 at 13:49
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In the comments you asked,

...do you know if it is possible also to work in stud.io with other 3d-files or only with bricks that are pre-integrated? So if i would have designed new bricks could i use them too?...

Looks like Brinklink also offers a tweak program to make custom bricks called PartDesigner, that's able to export right into Stud.io. I've never used it, but it might be promising to you.

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The kinds of software used to design LEGO MOC doesn't necessarily have to be solely confined to Computer Aided Design programs.

We can get really creative and exploit functions of programs never intended to be used for MOC bricking.

Enter: Adobe Photoshop - PS's main role is a visual graphic editor, but it does something strange if an image is magnified past 400%. PS breaks the image down into nice square shaped pixels. Perfect for making LEGO MOCs.

I use the PS squares created in two main ways:

  • 1) Top View pixel creation - Where the scale is a perfect 1:1.
  • 2) Side View pixel creation - Where two 1x1 plates stacked on top each other, almost equaling a PS square.

    Note: A 2x2 plate stacked on a 2x2 brick makes a nice a square also, but this will increase the size of our creation.

Well, anyway, the magnifying function is clearly not intended to brick out an outline, but it works well here.

I'm sure there are many other methods within and outside this specific graphic program to aid us in our build. PS does has a pixelation filter, and outside the program there are LEGO mosaic makers, but this interesting quirk breaks a solid image into pieces, where with minimum time and effort, a more precise stud length can be quickly counted out.

Speaking of counting, it will also help to know your LEGO Math here. So, when using Side View, 3 Plates = 1 Brick. Pixels of the same color can be group and merged into money saving bricks.

Here are two examples of Top View.

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Below is an example of one Side View pixel method I'm currently working on.

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