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When I was younger, the backs of my Castle/Space Lego set boxes showed alternate model builds for the supplied pieces, configurations not detailed in the instruction manual. I appreciated these creative ideas, showing me other things I could make with the pieces; I found them inspiring and sometimes challenging as they were presented without instructions. The inclusion of these models made me keep clippings from the boxes in order to replicate designs.

Today, it seems that alternate model designs are no longer presented on the backs/sides of Lego boxes.

Has Lego discontinued this practice, and why? Has it been dropped entirely for all sets, or is it simply not done for "licensed" sets (Batman, Star Wars, etc.).

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    Almost all the Technic sets still have instructions for a second model (online rather than printed). I suspect the problem is that sets and parts have become more specific so it's harder to make a decent B model, especially with the smaller sets. 100 parts, half of which are minifigs, just doesn't give a set designer many options. – Móż Nov 27 '14 at 3:50
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I do believe the LEGO Group has limited the instructions to only one build, not including the sets that are meant to re-build differently (in this case there are 3 instruction sheets).

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If instead of actually rebuilding the set you mean alternate views (like the back of a model, or the unfolded model, etc.) this still applies to most sets that have an inside, unfold, etc.

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    I'm referring to the instruction-less alternate builds, which were commonly displayed on the back and sides of the box. – JoshDM Nov 27 '14 at 5:45
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    @JoshDM I do believe that the LEGO Company has stopped displaying instruction-less builds, but sometimes you still see alternate views or unfoldings of the same build. – Timtech Nov 27 '14 at 12:53
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    Have they given a reason why? – JoshDM Nov 27 '14 at 17:01
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    I believe the parents complained that there weren't instructions provided for the alternative models, so Lego stopped showing them. I don't know if anyone can confirm this factoid, but I'm sure I read it once somewhere. – Windfire Nov 27 '14 at 21:53
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    This is the sort of info I'm looking for. Needs more research to back it up, but I'll accept any answer with a sourced variant on this comment info. – JoshDM Dec 31 '14 at 17:34
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I believe the reason is purely commercial. Why would parents buy another box of bricks if there are pictures of so many things their kid can build with only one set?

Nowadays there are no alternate models on back sides of boxes. Instead there are some teaser pictures of another sets, and a message "Collect them all!"

Isn't it rather obvious?

Anyone of the same opinion?

  • LEGO doesn't seem to be that kind of a company..... – rahuldottech Oct 18 '15 at 10:53
  • "Why would parents buy another box of bricks if there are pictures of so many things their kid can build with only one set?" - I thought the freedom of buying so many things with only one set is exactly why parents are supposed to buy a box of LEGO rather than another toy. – O. R. Mapper Oct 26 '16 at 9:00

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