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10

I believe the set you're looking for is the F1 Hauler (item no. 6484-1): Here are the details: It was released in 1995. It's a red-and-white truck for towing Formula 1 cars (and has no support legs). It has an 8 x 4 x 2.33 9V battery box, which is hidden in the body of the 6-stud-wide truck. It has a 1 x 4 light bar and a motorized winch driven by a 9V ...


10

I'm not sure about LEGO, but Märklin, a company that specialized in building train models used simple stainless steel since 1982, chances are that LEGO did the same: Stainless steel is relatively cheap It doesn't oxidize (as the name implies) The electrical charateristics aren't good, but you don't need a very good (and expensive) material like copper for ...


8

The short answer is about 150mA. Electrical Characteristics From the limited testing that I've done, the component you pointed out appears to be a positive temperature coefficient thermistor. Here's how Wikipedia describes their use as current limiters: When first connected to a voltage source, a large current corresponding to the low, cold, ...


8

In short, yes it's perfectly safe to run your old 9v motors from your Power Functions battery box. This excellent online reference has a lot of information on various LEGO motors. Both the old 9v train motor and the Power Functions train motor are listed. The information on the site shows that the characteristics of the two motors are very similar with the ...


5

The "My Own Train" series only lasted from 2001 - 2004, so it had a relatively short life span. For the most part, they were very nice sets with rich details. It most likely didn't resonate with collectors since the trains were available in various different colors, with or without a tender — this made it prohibitively expensive to own the collection since ...


4

The speed regulator light being on is a good start. It looks like you have things set up correctly as far as I can tell. The first step is to identify which part is having issues. All of these parts can be purchased on Bricklink, so once you know what has failed, you can replace the defective part. Here are some ideas for testing components: If you have a ...


4

A user on YouTube posted the following video that tests a lot of the various train motors in Lego history for their pulling strength. The battery model train from the 1960's destroyed the competition. Pulling Power of LEGO Trains 1966 till 2009 (Systems: 4.5V 12V 9V IR) The newer engines do not have rubber traction to grip, so they have a tendency to slip ...


4

To wire 2838 motor, you have to use one PF extension cable, one end connected to PF power source (either battery box or IR receiver), the other end has a 9V compatible plug on bottom. Unfortunately, 2838 also has its connector on bottom, so you also need a 9V cable (such as this one) to connect them.


4

The PF train motor has the same size and shape as the previous 9V Motors, and a lot of people are happily substituting one for the other. The Emerald Night, however, doesn't use that motor, so there your job will be much more tricky. Usually people change the tender to add two 9V motors there, but the wheel train of the engine tends to derail fairly easily ...


3

Maybe nickel silver, which would be a suitable material. But I only found a somewhat indirect claim on the german site 1000steine.


3

I'm not so sure using 9V will be usefull ? My son has a PF cargo train in his room, when he turns it on, it goes, ok. but even if my son goes downstair to get a cookie while he still has the PF emitter in his hand, then train still runs ! According to me, PF infrared link is used only when you wish to change speed setting, so if you don't plan to slow ...


3

My speed regulator is clearly labeled as being 9-12V AC. I have an official 12VAC transformer. I was curious about the internals of this device, so I opened it up: The circuit begins with 4 diodes in standard bridge rectifier configuration. This converts the AC input into a rippled DC voltage. The large capacitor (2200uF, 25V) then cleans up the ripples. ...


2

MindS1 is correct that in terms of electrical properties you don't need to be terribly picky. As you noted you will want multicore wire to allow for flexibility and prevent breakage. I'd also add that the standard 9V battery boxes are current limited, so in practice you can get away with 22 AWG or even 24 AWG wire. I'd encourage you to try out the wire in ...


2

You don't really need to worry about the wire gauge for Lego parts. This source indicates that only the beefiest lego motors breach 1A, and even then, only while completely stalled. Most of those motors even have thermal protection systems built-in to prevent damage in the stalled case. So anything around gauge 20 or lower would do the trick. Make sure to ...


2

It is never a good idea to electrically connect two regulators to the same piece of track. You could damage both of them! I assume you are referring to voltage drop (and thus reduced power when the loco is a long way from the regulator input. The problem is due to the fact that the electricity is carried through steel which has a higher electrical resistance ...


2

One option is to only use the 9V train motor, but power it most of the time with the PF battery back. This will require some customization of the motor, and probably some cutting/soldering of the wires, but this would work. (See: Can 10153 9V train motor be powered by the Power Functions Battery pack?) Another solution is to add a second battery pack in ...


1

If you don't connect the two subsystems electrically, then it is quite possible to do so. The Power Functions motor will be on when it can get a signal and the 9V train motor will be on when the train runs over the metal rails. The metal rails will need to have external power attached, and you have to adjust the speed there separately. The mechanical ...


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