19

Here are some disassembly pictures and tips. Tools needed: Either a precision flat-head or Philips screwdriver: There are two flat-head/Phillips hybrid screws that hold the the battery cover down. These two screws do not come completely out the battery cover. T9 Star Key: There are six T9 star screws. Four on the corners of the housing and two hidden ...


17

There is now official documentation for the Bluetooth protocol used by the Powered Up product line: https://github.com/LEGO/lego-ble-wireless-protocol-docs The community has created some tools to interact directly with Powered Up and Boost hubs. Here is one example: https://github.com/nathankellenicki/node-poweredup That tool supports basically every ...


7

There's a node.js library that can connect to the Move Hub and control attached peripherals: https://github.com/nathankellenicki/node-poweredup This should allow you to write scripts and programs that can control the motor from your Mac.


7

Official docs: https://lego.github.io/lego-ble-wireless-protocol-docs/ https://github.com/LEGO/lego-ble-wireless-protocol-docs Discussion: https://www.eurobricks.com/forum/index.php?/forums/topic/162288-powered-up-a-tear-down/&page=3 Inofficial modules: NodeJS: https://github.com/nathankellenicki/node-poweredup Python: https://pypi.org/project/...


6

I'm teaching an after school robotics program and the kids are using the LEGO MindStorms Education Core Set #45544. I was dealing with the same situation when I had to connect 10 EV3s to Bluetooth or Wi-Fi and I couldn't distinguish from one EV3 to the next. Anyhow, I figured out how easy it was to give each brick it's own unique identifying name. You want ...


5

The NXT actually uses IEEE 794 32-bit floating point number format in little endian byte order. I like using this site for conversions. So, to decode your messages: TX: 00 09 00 05 60 EA 00 00 00 Byte 0: 0x00 - response required Byte 1: 0x09 - write message command Byte 2: 0x00 - Mailbox 1 Byte 3: 0x05 - Message size of 5 bytes Bytes 4-7: 0x60 0xEA ...


5

No, the Robot Commander app downloads and runs a program on your EV3. If you already have a program running, it will be stopped and the program downloaded by the commander app will run instead.


5

As far as I know, this is not possible using the current stock firmware. The battery box can only pair with one device. The UI on the battery box is a single button, and for simplicity the device is either in a mode where it is looking for a device to pair with (flashing light) or already paired (solid light). There isn't a way to pair it with another device ...


5

I was able to remove the screws properly with a Torx T9 screwdriver from our Duplo Train Push & Go Motor (28743).


3

I can confirm that using something like jncranton suggested (a third-party library that speaks to PoweredUp devices over bluetooth), you can use a computer to control several PoweredUp devices at once. The limit seems to be the number of devices your Bluetooth will pair with. The Remote is a smart hub like the battery box so each remote counts as one ...


3

I've done some experimentation with using one powered up controller over two hub devices ... ( You must have one motor on channel A in Hub 1 & the other on Channel B in Hub 2 ) Seems to work, pairing involves turning on all devices at once, ( controller & Hub ) and waiting for it to sync + same with turning it off - press & hold all devices for 5 ...


3

Based on the answer to this question and some experiments with other hubs and other motors today (Boost hub + Boost motor + small PoweredUp hub), it seems that the WeDo motors really lack any ability beyond "Run with power X". Given that the WeDo motor is the same model that is built into the Bat Mobile, I would expect that the PoweredUp app would ...


3

I'm assuming you are using the Control+ app with the 42100 liebherr r 9800 set. The Control+ app is indeed limited to the fixed models. However the Powered Up app can also connect to the Control+ hub and supports it reasonably well. The Powered Up app has a "Create" mode where you can use programming blocks, it's similar to the Scratch educative ...


2

Looking at the stack trace in the exception you've posted, the error seems to be coming from a call to RemoteEV3.createRegulatedMotor: at lejos.remote.ev3.RemoteEV3.createRegulatedMotor(Unknown Source) at test_bluetooth.Bluetooth.main(Bluetooth.java:186) After that, it's just going through the motions to try and open a port on a remote device... From ...


2

Communicating with the NXT from the LEGO MINDSTORMS EV3 software is not supported. From http://www.lego.com/en-us/mindstorms/support/faq/: 3.10 Is the LEGO® MINDSTORMS® EV3 Home Edition Software backward-compatible with NXT Hardware? Yes. You can program your NXT Intelligent Brick using the new LEGO MINDSTORMS EV3 Home Edition Software. However, not all ...


2

There are many possible ways of doing this. I am a contributor to the ev3dev project, so I am a bit biased in that direction. To do this with ev3dev, I would install the nxt-python package on the EV3 and use it to remote control the NXT. If you want to stick with the standard firmware, another possibility would be to relay bluetooth mailbox messages ...


2

Maybe you should look into using a multiplexer to add additional sensors to an NXT brick. The Hitechnic Sensor Multiplexer lets you connect 4 sensors using only 1 of the NXT connection. The same thing can be done with motors. For example using the Mindsensors NXTMMX, you can add 2 additional motors per multiplexer (even better, if you daisy-chain the ...


2

There is always the .NET API for Windows 8/ if you don't mind programming an app yourself (this would work for Windows/Windows Phone 8). The sample provided would allow you to control the individual ports of the brick but it doesn't take much to change this to control multiple ports from one button press. https://github.com/BrianPeek/legoev3 Sadly this ...


2

According to the online documentation, Bluetooth commands are supported for NXT but not for EV3. On the other hand RobotC is supporting Bluetooth upload/debugging. This means that it is accessible. My first instinct would be to look at how RobotC did it (if the code is available). My second instinct would be to find if somebody already hacked the EV3 ...


2

There is an Android app called EV3 mailbox that can send messages to the EV3 brick. You can trigger your program to run in different ways by sending out different mailbox messages.


2

You can use any programming language you like to remotely control the NXT provided that it can access a serial port of your computer. The Bluetooth connection on the NXT provides a virtual serial port. You can see this by opening "Devices and Printers" and double-clicking on the NXT (provided that you have already paired it). Then have a look at the "...


2

https://bitbucket.org/Thad_Hughes/cortex/src Here's something in NXC and python that routes from NXT1 to NXT2 through the PC; emulating a non-master/slave config between all three devices. Has the added benefit of a seamless pairing method. It could be helpful to give a little more detail (what languages you are using, what direction(s) of communication ...


2

Bluetooth communication from the Mac to the EV3 is done using RFCOMM. This means that the EV3 appears as a serial port on the Mac. Namely /dev/tty.EV3-SerialPort. To send and receive messages from the EV3, you read and write to this virtual file. Bluetooth will show as "connected" as soon as you open this file. You can find some code examples here.


2

The MonoBrick C++ library that you linked is for NXT, not EV3. You can find the MonoBrick C# Library for EV3 here. It works with USB, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi and can manipulate files.


2

The remote control uses Bluetooth Low Energy rather than Bluetooth Classic. This means you do not pair the device and there is no PIN. The remote control is not an HID input device, but rather uses a custom protocol that is documented at https://lego.github.io/lego-ble-wireless-protocol-docs/.


2

Not with the standard software, not directly. You can however have the Xbox controller connect to your PC and "stream" your program, i.e. the program runs on your PC rather than the Hub and motor commands are forwarded... I found this quite disappointing when I was trying this...


1

rfcomm is an old and deprecated tool, so I'm not going to try to figure out what exactly is going on. I suspect that it has to do with the fact that it treats the connection as a TTY and it is sending extra characters to the EV3 that messes up the communication protocol. I tried adding: import tty ... tty.setraw(f.fileno()) to the program to fix this, ...


1

The key is to make sure the driver works with MS's bluetooth stack, and doesn't just use it's own stack. Press Win+R, type bthprops.cpl (or maybe irprops.cpl, it's been a while), hit enter. Check the Hardware tab to make sure your device actually shows up. If not, try different drivers/manually installing the driver using the "Have disk" method. 3rd ...


1

You can find some information on I2C in FPGAs on fpga4fun. There are lots of I2C cores on OpenCores, too. The biggest challenge would be how to connect your FPGA to the peripherals. My advice is to get a tiny development board like this one, and then you need to supply power to it, but this can be battery-powered since FPGAs are typically low-powered. You ...


1

You will not be able to do this with the official LEGO firmware, but it will be possible with ev3dev or possibly another 3rd-party OS for EV3. Search the web for "linux bluetooth hid emulation". There are plenty of examples. I haven't tried any of them, so I can't recommend any specific one here. I can recommend using the python programming language with ...


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