79

I saw this technique in LEGO's Disney Castle for offsetting parts of a column by half of a stud. You can see the column on the left in this picture is shifting half a stud above a 3x3 plate: Of course you can do it too! Here is the process: Take your 3x3 base plate and stick 1x1 "dots" between each of the studs. The "dots" are LEGO part 4073 which ...


47

For centring a minifigure on a 3×3 plate, I would do the following (though it’s not exactly what you asked for): Arrange 2×1 plates with centre studs as follows: Add 1×1 panels for optical harmony: Put a 3×2 plate on top: Place your minifigure in the middle:


33

Non powered/motorized flight has been achieved Bamboo copter Anna Vuurzoon made a Flying machine using only Lego parts which uses a ripcord to propel a three blade propeller on a stick (see http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/288875). I was able to duplicate her results, so can validate it does work. It is really a modification of a bamboo copter. The 2015 ...


27

I see that this popped up on HNQ, so I wanted to expand on shoover's excellent answer with a build showing one way that this could be put together for folks that may not be as familiar with LEGO elements as the Bricks community. As was already pointed out, the key element here is the 2x2 turntable base without a turntable attached: Here's how you might ...


26

A fan is just 1/4 of a drone, right? Check out this lego drone that actually flies, for inspiration. https://youtu.be/wUVvQk7XLd4 The blade part in question is 89509


24

The wall behind the shelving unit is not a standard wall built with regular LEGO bricks, but a panel, which is hollow on one side. The parts that are sticking out at the back of the bookshelf are accommodated by the hollow of the panel. My guess is that you attached the panel backwards with the flat side facing in, instead of out. Look at Page 37/Step 48 ...


22

1977 When Technic was first introduced. Check out this alternative build of set 850:


22

Three 1x1 plates, two 1x1 round bricks, and one 1x1 plate with clip.


20

There is a website, http://rebrickable.com/, that lets you enter the sets you have, and it compares the inventories to other sets to determine which other official sets you can build with those pieces. It also includes unofficial MOCs that other builders have submitted, and it will substitute other part colors if you choose. For example, just entering the ...


19

It's kinda chunky, but the best I can come up with is 42446 + 2555: + = It would leave a half-plate gap on one side if they only have 1 holster though, but at-least you keep the regular minifig legs. NOTE: This probably wouldn't be considered a "legal" connection, due to the semi-octagonal shape of the leg connectors. It's definitely possible to put ...


18

You might be interested in the excellent, hilarious and comprehensive Communist LEGO report. It tells you all you can expect, from the good brands to the bad brands. At a minimum, it'll get you rolling of your chair with laughter. A summary taken from the document: Brand List 2015 LEGO is a global brand and has been the subject of many copies over the years....


18

If stability is not an issue, consider the following: Put a 4×4 dish on your 3×3 plate (yes, this fits): Put your 2×2 plate in the middle (in any orientation you like): If you want to centre your minifigure, add a layer of 2×1 plates with centre studs: … and place your minifigure on top: (This also works with a 1×1 plate instead of the dish, but it ...


17

Another soloution if rotational stability is not too much of a concern and you don't like having studs on show. Put a 1x1 plate in the middle of the 3x3 plate and surround it with 1x1 or 1x2 flat tiles so you have a 3x3 surface with a single stud popping up in the middle. You can now stack a 2x2 plate on top held in place by the single stud.


17

The easiest way to do this would be to use a motor with a high speed (or gear up a lower speed motor) and then attach one of the larger propeller elements to it. You can probably build a custom prop, but it might be challenging to build something with the proper blade angle while keeping it light and strong enough to not break apart when rotating quickly. ...


16

I have seen a number of very creative builds with the orange brick separator. Here are some examples: Spaceship by F@bz: http://www.flickr.com/photos/fabz71/12434428513/ Mech by Lewis Meeny: http://www.flickr.com/photos/tr0jinh0rse/11318913594/ Deep Sea Explorer by Keith Reed: http://www.flickr.com/photos/keithreed/12943153094/ And my favorite is this ...


15

There is a problem with the Mythbusters building technique. One of the first things you learn about building with Lego is that, if you want a stable structure, your bricks need to interlock as much as possible. The Unofficial Lego Builder's Guide illustrates this rather well: Unfortunately, to make the build easier the Mythbustes team assembled a series ...


15

You probably could use this, which looks exactly like it's the missing part of your puzzle: You'll be interested to know that this part has intitially been proposed by the first four fans (MUPs, for LEGO Mindstorms Users Panel) working on the very first NXT kit and regularly ran into the same problem as yours. A lot of Technic fans now name the part after ...


15

There seems to be basically two choices. You can either build a larger version than the traditional cube, or you can build something that doesn't stay together very well. There's a nice example of a small cube on Sebastians Sand's Brickshelf: While this looks like it would work, I can't imagine that it holds together through many rotations. If you are ...


15

Would this solve your problem? Depending on the direction of the input, only one axle will turn.


14

The lamp is made by LEGO artist Sean Kenney. Along with some other items, he sells the lamps on his website. They are available in a range of styles and colours, but they are quite expensive. Since he is selling the lamps I think it is unlikely the plans are available, although the pictures on his website are quite high resolution so you may be able to ...


14

There's a brick-built spiral staircase in the Pet Shop: That's definitely the most common way to do it. You just build up around a central point. This can be expanded to use longer or wider steps: http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/267772 You can also use 2x2 turntables if you need more strength and/or larger stairs: http://www.popscreen.com/v/6UIWz/...


14

If it's your own creation, you should be able to adapt your model to fit the rack you have. One tricky problem I can see is if your construction is built as most studless models are nowadays and features uneven dimensions - which means a 7 rack is indeed easier than a 8. You can of course build something around the old 1x4 rack place but it might get ...


14

I attempt to create a searchable index of SNOT techniques, as this is called. Of those, the strongest 180 degree stud reversal are probably one of these: If you want to connect the two curves together bottom to bottom, you should be able to do it with an axle, sort of like these two techniques: If that doesn't work I once had luck playing around with a ...


14

45° angles are tricky because of the dimensions of 45-45-90 triangles: The fact that the hypotenuse needs to be a multiple of radical two makes it difficult to build out of LEGO plates which are generally limited to integers or halves. The best you can do in a reasonably small amount of space is a 5 x 5 x 7.07 triangle, but that doesn't come close enough to ...


14

Hinges can work, I have used this technique before, if you sandwich the hinges between two plates you get 45 degree 'bricks' that are quite solid. In most cases, tiles and plates in the right place will keep sufficient contact with the base plate to have a stable model.


14

To create a smooth surface with cheese slopes they must be offset by one-half plate in height. There are several techniques to do this. Here is one using the common "headlight" brick. It has the advantage of being extendable to nearly any length.


14

The Atlantis Submarine Voyage ride at LEGOLAND Windsor has almost 100 models (albeit glued together) submerged in a 1,000,000 litre tank with 'upto 50 species of rare sharks, rays and tropical fish'. If LEGO bricks can withstand those conditions, I think you'll be fine. Most of these models are quite large (and heavy), so you may need to weigh down or ...


14

How about a Minifig scale playground slide? There is a connection point for an Technic Axle connector to provide the support for the slide and two stud connections to add a ladder.


14

The short answer is because the combined height of the two mini inverted brackets is greater than the interior space of a tile (or brick for that matter.) But you knew this already. I realize it isn't considered standard by the rest of the world, but because the only quality calipers I had access to tonight are customary, all these values will be in inches. ...


14

Before I attempt to come up with an answer, let me share how I think through problems like this, as it might make it easier for others to solve problems like this in the future. We can see that the gap itself is 30 LDU, as modules are 20 LDU, so 1.5 modules is 30 LDU. Some quick rules of thumb: Multiples of 20 LDU can be made with regular bricks ...


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