14

How about a Minifig scale playground slide? There is a connection point for an Technic Axle connector to provide the support for the slide and two stud connections to add a ladder.


11

I'm not aware of this being used in any official sets, but I'm happy to be proven wrong. I can say that LEGO considers this to be an "illegal" connection. The Technic pins need room to spring back out and be "in click", or they can be permanently damaged by prolonged assembly. LEGO would not allow this connection to be used in a current set. A Technic pin ...


10

Just to add a little to the answer by TheBrickBlogger, the blue piece holding the purple 1x1 slope is likely this one: Here is a really simple example of one of the many ways this can be accomplished: The hollow stud allows positioning to be "jumped". Hope this is helpful :)


10

The black cheese-slope is attached to the stud below, and the purple cheese-slope is attached to the upside-down stud above it. The two cheese slopes are not attached to each other, but are held in place by the studs and the other pieces around them. Cheese-slope techniques have been extensively researched by LEGO fan Katie Walker, who is well known for her ...


7

One thing I've been using some of my brick separators for is in the construction of wedges for robotics and competition builds. The semi-sharp prying edge is sharper than most parts, and the angle is decent enough for a low wedge. They have no strong connectors of their own, but the height of the brick edge is 2 plates tall, meaning it will fit well between ...


7

If you use a crown gear or bevel gear to connect your gears twice perpendicularly, they are exactly opposing each other, turn in opposite directions, and are parallel (if the respective axle is aligned to the coordinate system of the construction). Like with all gear-to-gear connections, you have a little wiggle room that may exceed half a tooth. If you ...


7

How can I get 2 opposing gear's axles to be perfectly parallel? Are there any good workarounds? You could use an idler gear. It will even out the offset. Yet, at the same time, it (or any odd number of idler gears) will cause both axles to spin in one direction. On the other hand, two (or any even number of) idler gears will not affect the asynchrony of ...


6

This is a good idea for brick separators!


6

LEGO Technic sets are the most complex builds in LEGO's selection, and they are not forgiving. Any little mistake, and the model won't work. LEGO Technic sets are not easy to build, as you have to pay careful attention to each and every step. In addition, if you do make a mistake, the models are not nearly as easy to take apart as regular LEGO sets. Your ...


5

This answer is pretty long and complex, so bear with me. After a couple hours of toying around with LDD, I have finally come up with a design that suits my needs fully within the realm of "traditional" Lego Building techniques. After digging around in the sub-categories in LDD, I stumbled across this block (here). This brick is essentially what made this ...


4

You could use a belt system to get a perfect, parallel rotation. The chain links used in this video are #3711 and the gears appear to be the same as the ones shown in your example. There doesn't seem to be an easy way to get the gears to turn in opposite directions without the use of gears (without that half tooth lag). Two high friction, Technic rubber ...


4

JMK! This is what I came up with: Studless overall look. Studless (Gray) window paneling and thickening. (Black) window pane connecting pieces Part #6541 Technic Brick 1x1. (Flame Yellow) window frame connecting pieces Part #87087 Brick, Modified 1 x 1 with Stud on 1 Side. Bird's eye view. LEGO Digital Draw build file: HERE.


3

Since you are willing to use a non-LEGO frame to hold the roof and glue to fix all together, I would recommend buying baseplates in bulk and gluing them onto a wooden frame as if they were shingles. If the gradient and the overlap (vertical between rows and horizontal between individual plates) are correctly matched, the rain won't get inside. For more ...


3

Have you tried using "bricks with groove" ? https://www.bricklink.com/v2/search.page?q=brick%20with%20groove#T=A


3

Lego has somewhat recently started a theme called Xtras, if case you weren't aware. They have a variety of odds & ends great for detailing builds. They do have some printed tiles in a few of the packs, but probably not quite the variety you're after. If you can't find the printed elements needed for your build elsewhere, you might try the 853921 sticker ...


3

All of the decorations in the LEGO Juniors (now called LEGO 4+) sets are printed, and they tend to have a lot of nice decorations. Decorated parts in the LEGO Ideas sets are also almost always printed, but double check this because at least some of the sets also have stickers. There is not one set which is going to be full of printed parts, and sets with ...


3

Lego bricks can be purchased individually from Lego.com using their Pick-A-Brick service. https://www.lego.com/en-us/page/static/pick-a-brick?icmp=HP-SHQL-EG-NO-pick-a-120 If you have an official Lego Store near you then buying bricks from their Pick-A-Brick Wall is a less expensive option once you figure out how to maximize the amount of bricks you ...


3

Based on your drawing and description, the closest analogy to your idea would be a railway turntable, where the mech bays would be akin to the roundhouse and the "exit" on your diagram represents the connecting railway to the turntable switching yard. LEGO models of such structures can be found and analysed for their various building techniques to see which ...


3

I am intrigued by mechanical problems like these and couldn't resist adding my own solutions in the hope of being helpful. I threw together the first few ideas I had that were fairly compact and used contrasting colors to help the eyes figure out the building techniques. They are all raw designs that are free of cosmetic pieces to expose their construction ...


2

As @Mołot commented, first ask the contest committee whether they have specific rules. In general though, shipping in chunks is common, ideally few pieces that are simple and straightforward to attach. Rigid, sturdy builds are obviously going to stand up better to the travails of shipping, so try to avoid spindly construction. Follow good mechanical ...


2

Another alternative could be the mindstorms EV3 steel ball, it's fairly small and heavy. https://www.bricklink.com/v2/catalog/catalogitem.page?P=99948#T=C Possible downside is: it is almost impossible to mount so it will just have to be enclosed with bricks or beams and even then it may rattle.


2

I know this is an older thread, but I think I've come up with a small improvement on WindFire's build using part# 33492 Cone 1 1/2 x 1 1/2 x 2/3 truncated. Its slighty larger than a head so it's a tighter fit. Also, using part# 85861 Plate, Round 1 x 1 with Open Stud allows it to have a bit better hold than the clip connection. Now to somehow ...


2

There is only one piece that fits all your criteria: 41823. Placing four of those pieces together will create a 6x6 circle with a 4x4 interior gap. Albeit, it is a decorative fence piece and it's two studs tall, so it might not work for what you are trying to accomplish.


2

This was not as easy as I thought. I think I solved the "flush" problem in the following way: This is the final result: The secret behind it consists of brackets 2436 (or 2436b) and the famous hinge plates 4275 / 4276. For the lower part, put the brackets on top of two plate layers. Then add a 1x8 plate in front. For the upper part, you need the brackets ...


2

Some of the Indiana Jones sets had some simple heavy weapon builds in them. Set# 7625 had a belt fed/ammo-box mount style machine gun: Set# 7626 had a RPG:


1

Just figured it out by rebuilding it. I had pressed the "walls" of the transmission too much, resulting in very high friction.


1

This is a tricky question and really depends on the individual child. For my children I sometimes provide them with Lego sets that are too complicated for their age and we build it together so that I can teach them as we go. They build until they get stuck, or something isn't working right, and then I help them solve the problem. They are usually very ...


1

No, LEGO did not intend to do that building method though I have to admit, It is a pretty cool technique. So far there haven’t been any sets like that but maybe in the future LEGO people will realize they can do that.


1

You know, I hate it when I post a question like this, but I come up with the solution almost immediately after. Let me explain as best I can... So, I did some digging online for pictures to use as references for building this turntable I described above. By sheer luck, I stumbled across this post on LEGO Ideas for a discontinued idea for a Train Turntable ...


1

The simplest solution I can currently think of is to use a linear actuator to push the buttons down because they are compact, strong, and have a lot of pushing force. You can either have one actuator per button or use worm gears to finely move the actuator over each button. This would have to move in both the X and Y direction however because the buttons ...


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