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26

I see that this popped up on HNQ, so I wanted to expand on shoover's excellent answer with a build showing one way that this could be put together for folks that may not be as familiar with LEGO elements as the Bricks community. As was already pointed out, the key element here is the 2x2 turntable base without a turntable attached: Here's how you might ...


19

It sounds like you're trying to implement a fairly simple bell mechanism such as this one: You can certainly do this using some string and the pulley element that you mentioned. I'd recommend tying the string to one of the holes in the pulley. Something like this worked reasonably well for me: Here it is in action: You'll likely want to do something to ...


13

From this picture and this one, you can see that the framing of the windows is formed by Turntable 2 x 2 Plate, Base in black. For the colored areas (the "stained glass"), you have a couple of options: You could use different "Trans-X" colored Plate, Round 1 x 1 inserted into the back, but you'll need some trans-clear plates to back them up so the ...


12

Classic-Castle.com has a guide for making castle walls more visually appealing. Key points: Different colours, shades and textures of bricks add subtle imperfections. Break up the monotony with windows, doors, arrow slits, balconies and other structural features. Use timber (brown/tan) as well as stone (grey) bricks and try out adding different materials.


12

Scale is the obvious answer. The Legoland model is huge, which means you're not seeing the brick-level quantisation as easily (quantisation is most obviously seen in mosaics but that works in 3D too). Getting the same effect at smaller scales usually means a lot of SNOT and using sloped bricks. These days there is a huge range of slopes available, from 4 ...


12

Tree Palm Top was used as lanterns in old pirate sets, for example 6285


9

1989's Eldorado Fortress from the Pirates universe had torches made from part 3959 with a single transparent stud on the "top", with the entire assembly pushed into an Erling brick. You can get a similar effect by clipping a lightsaber hilt piece to the wall or putting it onto a post. Just add a suitable flame piece (or simple stud) coming out of one end. ...


7

From the EBay listing you posted: Precise Molded & Printed Items (MOC-My Own Creations) Ergo, these are custom minifigs, not made by LEGO.


6

The Adventures Tomb 2996 set you mentioned uses shutter holders to mount the door and a 1x6x1 arch to cover the space behind the doors: It is also very common to use a 1x6x2 arch, as was done in Dark Fortress Landing 8802: As I mentioned in another answer, these clips generally attach to the back of the door, not the side. The geometry is more complicated ...


6

Knight's Kingdom II - the guardian (picture taken from bricklink) http://www.bricklink.com/catalogItem.asp?M=cas264 I searched on Bricklink catalog under, 'minifig leg assembly' using the keyword, 'brown,' using thumbnails. Only had two pages to look through.


5

If you have access to some Duplo elements, these make good "bulking" blocks for larger terrain sections - as the 2x2 and larger bricks fit over the top of the duplo studs you can build a fairly stable base using those, and then work on the sides and top with System elements as needed. Otherwise it comes down to sensible building techniques such as starting ...


4

Couple of Brick, Arch 1 x 3 x 3 pieces produce somewhat similar archway.


4

I have those doors, and you're right about the shutter holder bricks, which are pretty fragile. The doors each cover half the space under a 1x6x2 arch. Besides the shutter snaps, the only connection point is the stud/doorknob.


3

Good places to find parts include: Thrift stores, car boot sales, jumble sales. Sometimes you get lucky. eBay is a good general source for parts... as long as you can find what you're looking for. LEGO's Pick-a-Brick (PAB) service is good for for common parts. LEGO's replacement parts service is better for less common parts from newer sets. The range of ...


3

I don't build castles in general. But I do build Churches. For me I go very simple when it comes to breaking up the walls. I use an extreme amount of windows. Other shades of bricks. Often will use another color to add details or designs.


2

Card 62 (Gargoyles) can be found near the bottom of this page: http://www.mikerayhawk.com/knights_kingdom.htm


2

You can purchase, brand new, the complete set of cards, 1-80 on eBay HERE. The price has the potential to be less than what's stated, becasue the seller is accepting "Make Offer" deals.


1

This part is a typical wood plank with nails (which are metal) on it. There are many variations of it, and almost all of them have nails, therefore they don't really count. However I've looked at all variations and the only ones I can find that have more metal are this one, this one and this one.


1

A straight forward wall of Lego bricks will have some pliability that can be used to a Master Builder's advantage. I did manage to find a YouTube video that sums it up nicely. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9U-n1NZYNpI


1

Yeah you pretty much have the two choices you outlined... hinges or make it so big that the squareness of the bricks melts into nothingness at that resolution. OR... build your structure over tiles and use single studs, like at the ends of the ends of the hypotenuse of a 3-4-5 triangle... but that will be seriously flimsy the higher you build the walls, ...


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