Hot answers tagged

46

The answer I've heard the most (with a source citing the official confirmation) is that green, brown and gray bricks were omitted from the LEGO palette because the company wanted to discourage kids from building tanks, planes, and other realistic military hardware.


26

Early LEGO colors were inspired by the work of Mondriaan, which mainly consists of white, black, red, blue and yellow. These primary colors were considered to be most appealing to kids. From the book “Brick by Brick”: The new product was patented in 1958 and within a few years bright yellow, red and blue Lego bricks, colours inspired by the paintings ...


22

I believe the main reason is so that the pieces are easy to identify in the instructions - as many LEGO sets don't have the Technic style "List of elements used in this step" it's always a fun game of "Spot the difference" to see what's changed: If those pieces were all red, then the target audience (5+ on those sets for example) might find it very ...


22

Further to Alex's answer, from that source I found eleven colours that only lasted a year: Fabuland Orange 1983 Very Light Orange 2000 Clikits Lavender 2005 Chrome Black 2009 Chrome Green 1999 Satin White 2020 Satin Trans-Light Blue 2020 Satin Trans-Dark Pink 2020 Glitter Trns-Orange 2020 Speckle Black-Copper 2006 Speckle DBGray-Silver 2006 Of course the ...


20

This Flickr image from Brick Colorstream shows all the known colors of LEGO bricks, charted along a timeline of when they were available. According to that image, there was one new color in 2015, "Conductive Black". (Click for full size)


18

According to Bricklink, Very Light Orange was only used by single part for one year only - in 2000. It was used in 2 sets (Scala and Belville) and 1 "gear". That part is this cat: Another color is Clikits Lavender used by a number of parts (9, to be precise) for Clikits theme and these were produced in 2005. Here's a picture by Ryan Howerter


15

Hand colors other than yellow are generally used to either match skin tone in licensed themes, or to represent some sort of gloves. The police officer you mentioned is probably "wearing" some sort of motorcycle or driving glove: When minifigs were first introduced in the late 70s, the only ones to have non-yellow hands were the space minifigs:


15

A practical engineering concern could be a reason to limit the colours used for molding in ABS plastic. The colourant added to the base plastic can affect the physical properties of the molded part. Depending on how tight the dimensional tolerances are for the finished part a separate mold may be required for each colour. Perhaps the Lego group process ...


14

I have a background in precision injection moulding, although not to the extremely tight tolerances of Lego. Here's why a manufacturer would try to reduce the number of colours they used, particularly in the old days. Most resin (the raw material) nowadays comes pre-coloured, especially for a large customer like Lego. That wasn't the case fifty or sixty ...


13

Again, Bricklink can help with the answer: When downloading the catalog, you specify "Part and Color Codes". This will give you a list of all part numbers and the color codes they have been produced in. To answer the question, some scripting has to be done to count lines with equal parts, etc. To make it short, this is the top 10 list: Duplo Brick 2x2 (53 ...


11

Please contact LEGO customer service. They will send you new pieces, and even more importantly, they will make note about the quality issues. The following quote is from the LEGO Ambassador forum in regards to quality issues by Keith Severson, who is the senior manager for community support at LEGO. It is about recent quality problems with another LEGO ...


11

Absolutely it will. The yellowing is caused by exposure to UV light, which it will get more of with direct sunlight shining on it. If it has to be in the window you could look at some glass coverings that block some of the UV, or find a home for it else where under electric light.


11

Unfortunately, this is common to several colors in the LEGO color pallette. According to this article on Eurobricks.com, The LEGO Group (TLG) made a change in the early 2000’s in how they make their colors: they used to have premixed color granules but abandoned those in favor of a system of white granules with colored dyes added in. This new system allows ...


9

Going for contrast to help you build? This is probably the primary reason most of the time. One Eurobricks user once said they asked a set designer about it, and they confirmed they do it to makes it easier to follow the instructions: I had an opportunity some time ago to talk to a designer at TLG, and he told me that they use other colors to make it ...


9

In general the colors would take on a yellowish hue. The colors that are most damaged by sunlight are white and blue. White can turn all the way to dark tan, and blue will take on an ugly yellowish color. On the other hand red would fade into pink. But again; the sun does damage the bricks. They will turn brittle and somewhat powdery, like all plastics do. ...


9

Neither Bricklink nor Brickset knows about such a piece (all teddy bear pieces of this mold with downward arms come in non-transparent colours and are printed), so it must be either a knock-off (very low value), or a test mold (very high value).


8

As I answered on another question, LEGO officially released its internal palette in 2010. It showed 51 colours in use, although their company profile spoke about 58. This is the Palette LEGO used in 2010, meaning that only these colours were in production then. Unfortunately, LEGO doesn't release this info on a regular basis (I'm frankly quite surprised ...


8

In my experience, this typically means you used the other colored part by accident somewhere else in the model, for example in a place where it is used on its own, and it was difficult to determine the exact color of the piece at that time. This happens a lot with colors like dark bluish gray, light bluish gray and pearl gray. You will need to go back ...


7

Use clothing dye to change the color. It works for wear and tear. It doesn't wear off. It dyes the part rather than coating it.


7

Quorneng's answer is spot on, even bricks that were from the same set might have been made from differing batches of a particular color and slight variances will produce differing colors. Purple is the most notorious Lego color for having a great deal of variance between bricks, and red is not surprisingly, also inconsistent at times. To add to the mix, ...


7

It looks like these darker are the same bricks in Blue that have simply "yellowed" over time, which changes the shade of the color. Another answer explains the reason behind this process.


7

As of this moment, officially - no. The ones available for sale are, most likely, test runs that made their way from LEGO factory since none of them have been included in any of sets. Red is known to be common color for running tests with injection moulding. Quite a few other test parts in Red (the color that hasn't been used by those particular parts in any ...


6

The color of the 2x4 plate and 1x2 jumpers in the photo appears to be regular Dark Blue: The greenish tint you mention is likely discoloration. Here is an example of a discolored regular blue piece (right) next to a fairly new regular blue piece (left) for comparison: How uniform or consistent the discoloraton is depends on the cause and/or ...


6

The best way to figure out what colors a set of parts have in common is to use BrickLink’s Stud.io digital design software. I am unable to show screenshots at the moment, but here are the steps: Open Stud.io Place the parts in question on your virtual building workspace (doesnt matter in which color) Select all the parts together, either by: using the ...


5

In case anyone familiar with JavaScript is interested, I wrote this script (tested in Firefox 19) which lets the user specify the number of tiles (bricks) of each colour and browse for an image file with the same number of pixels. The luma (brightness) of each pixel is ranked and assigned one of the listed colours. Any ties are arbitrarily assigned to ...


5

(I can't believe this hasn't been asked yet, so I'm still looking for a duplicate.) In a nutshell, yes, everybody noticed and it was actually one of the biggest consumer backlash the LEGO company had to endure. Fans vowed to never play with LEGO again, and so on. The fact that the LEGO company did the change unannounced, and even happily mixed both ...


5

According to a comment from Jan.k 1974 on the source you mentioned (in your comment to 62Bricks answer): The milky white brick dates to 2005 and has been been made exclusively for the Allianz Arena (Munich soccer stadium) model in Legoland Günzburg. I remember they sold spares of these in packs of 5 for 1.99 after the grand opening This is confirmed by ...


5

BrickLink's statistics in Aziraphale's answer give a good answer if you're only asking about parts that were commercially available in sets. But Lego has made a 2x2 tile in every single color, for their internal color charts. They don't leave Lego's hands very often, but we do have pictures :) Here are some of them: https://www.flickr.com/photos/rjmorton/...


5

There are two shades of light-pink in LEGO's history that were included in official sets. (Please note that there are other, rare shades of pink that never made it into mass production but were used as test colors or for special projects.) The older light-pink is simply called "pink" in the BrickLink Color Guide, and also often referred to as "Paradisa Pink",...


5

I could not find a tool with this ability, so I made one using the Rebrickable API. You can find it here: https://gist.github.com/ali1234/836ba792390c1a5feca9a3dcb35c14af It parses an LDraw file and selects all the bricks of a specified colour (by LDraw colour number, eg yellow = 14), then for each unique piece it requests all available colours. Finally it ...


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