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26

To answer the first part of the question, the Company Profile presentation (deep, direct link) states: When the minifigure first appeared, it was decided that its face should have only one colour: yellow. And that its facial features should be happy and neutral . The figure would have no sex, race or role – these would be determined by the child’s ...


25

The official LEGO color chart at Peeron has 111 colors listed. There are 14 listed as "transparent" (or "tr"), so - 97. The Peeron guide also lists CMYK, RGB, HTML Hex Codes (displayed as the sample), and Pantone numbers for each.


25

Around 2004 (if I remember correctly) LEGO changed the grey and dark grey colors. The colors before the change were the original grey colors which were in use from their introduction. They were somewhat warmer than the colors today, which was perceived as looking faded, though it had nothing to do with aging. Part of the problem was that the competition (...


23

All of this is correct, ABS can't be transparent and thus transparent parts are made of PC. PC against PC bonds way too tighly and designers are actually forbidden to do that in their models. (I've a 4L lightsaber blade stuck in the crossend of a Technic beam, both trans-red, and I can't get it out.) I'm fairly sure there's a designer (possibly Jamie Berard ...


23

The latest palette officially released by LEGO in 2010 has 51 colors in use, including 33 regular colors, 14 transparent, and 4 "effect" (silver, gold, metallic, phosphorescent). Of course, as 81bronco points out, there have been a lot more, but these are the one LEGO was effectively using as of January 2010. In the few years before that, LEGO was busy ...


22

I don't think that spray paint would be very durable. Even if you used a primer specifically designed for plastic the paint would scratch off fairly easily. Also, spray paint would add a noticeable amount of thickness to the brick and could interfere when trying to mate the brick up with others.


20

This Flickr image from Brick Colorstream shows all the known colors of LEGO bricks, charted along a timeline of when they were available. According to that image, there was one new color in 2015, "Conductive Black". (Click for full size)


18

The problem is that bricks are coloured throughout, not just surface coloured, which means any paint you add will wear off. My guidance is to source a brick in the colour you need and replace it.


17

I believe the main reason is so that the pieces are easy to identify in the instructions - as many LEGO sets don't have the Technic style "List of elements used in this step" it's always a fun game of "Spot the difference" to see what's changed: If those pieces were all red, then the target audience (5+ on those sets for example) might find it very ...


16

Black. Peeron.com has a colour table that lists how many pieces of each colour you would have if you had one of every set in their database. Obviously their database is not complete, it doesn't relate to when ABS was introduced (but most of the pieces produced in all time will have been since then), and some sets have been produced in higher numbers, so ...


16

According to Auto Body Repair by Duffy and Sharff, the best solution for any interior or exterior (non-flexible) ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, the plastic LEGO elements are made of) component is to apply a standard lacquer based system, no primer.


16

If it's for a display model (static on a shelf) you could use scale model paint and varnish. Matching the original color will be hard, so don't expect perfection. On the other hand, if your looking to 'play' with that piece afterward, I don't think any paint method can resist that abuse. like mentioned by Rory Alsop you're better off finding the real ...


15

Considering that color has been produced explicitely and exclusively for Maersk sets, it's highly unlikely they would change it. Most people seem to agree that the same color has been used for all Maersk ships sets. That said, you'll also need to consider that even if LEGO never intended to change the color, small variations in hue are always possible (red ...


14

Hand colors other than yellow are generally used to either match skin tone in licensed themes, or to represent some sort of gloves. The police officer you mentioned is probably "wearing" some sort of motorcycle or driving glove: When minifigs were first introduced in the late 70s, the only ones to have non-yellow hands were the space minifigs:


12

At some point, LEGO changed three of its staple colors: light gray, dark gray and brown. This was but the latest on a long series of traumatic changes imposed by the Danish company, and some fans couldn't stand it any more. While some vowed to never touch LEGO again and some didn't really care, the vast majority, who knew they couldn't fight their ...


11

According to the LEGO customer service site which allows you to search by color family, there are 9 color families and 23 exact colors: Color Family Exact Color ------------------------------------------- Black BLACK Blue BRIGHT BLUE Blue EARTH BLUE Blue MEDIUM BLUE Blue TR. BLUE Blue TR. LIGHT BLUE Green ...


11

The Cult Of Lego book (ISBN: 978-1-59327-391-0) had an a whole page about the change in minifigure skin colour: Page 59, sentence 2: Originally, the LEGO Group sought to leave racial and gender differences to the imagination of builders by using a stylised, generic face with outfits to differentiate roles. Page 59, sentence 4: The most ...


10

I believe it is supposed to be 24 Bright Yellow, however I know there were some complaints a last year or so regarding the collectable Minifigures and others that were made in China not having the same hue as "regular" minifigures - and now that some of the licensed products are also being made there, this difference will become more common. These figures ...


10

It's Lego blasphemy to change the color of the bricks (or to modify them using, say, a dremmel) but that said I would use the spray paint that is made for plastic. Of course, whenever I go to Lowes the color selection is limited so you may not find the color you need.


10

Please contact LEGO customer service. They will send you new pieces, and even more importantly, they will make note about the quality issues. The following quote is from the LEGO Ambassador forum in regards to quality issues by Keith Severson, who is the senior manager for community support at LEGO. It is about recent quality problems with another LEGO ...


10

Absolutely it will. The yellowing is caused by exposure to UV light, which it will get more of with direct sunlight shining on it. If it has to be in the window you could look at some glass coverings that block some of the UV, or find a home for it else where under electric light.


9

You can use GIMP for this. First you need to scale the image to the size you want. (If you want to stack bricks on top of each other instead of a baseplate, use a different y-scaling to correspond the bricks height.) Now create a palette by going to the Palette tab and click the "New palette" icon. In this add the bricks colors you want. You can find the ...


9

In general the colors would take on a yellowish hue. The colors that are most damaged by sunlight are white and blue. White can turn all the way to dark tan, and blue will take on an ugly yellowish color. On the other hand red would fade into pink. But again; the sun does damage the bricks. They will turn brittle and somewhat powdery, like all plastics do. ...


9

Going for contrast to help you build? This is probably the primary reason most of the time. One Eurobricks user once said they asked a set designer about it, and they confirmed they do it to makes it easier to follow the instructions: I had an opportunity some time ago to talk to a designer at TLG, and he told me that they use other colors to make it ...


8

As I answered on another question, LEGO officially released its internal palette in 2010. It showed 51 colours in use, although their company profile spoke about 58. This is the Palette LEGO used in 2010, meaning that only these colours were in production then. Unfortunately, LEGO doesn't release this info on a regular basis (I'm frankly quite surprised ...


8

Unfortunately, this is common to several colors in the LEGO color pallette. According to this article on Eurobricks.com, The LEGO Group (TLG) made a change in the early 2000’s in how they make their colors: they used to have premixed color granules but abandoned those in favor of a system of white granules with colored dyes added in. This new system allows ...


7

Quorneng's answer is spot on, even bricks that were from the same set might have been made from differing batches of a particular color and slight variances will produce differing colors. Purple is the most notorious Lego color for having a great deal of variance between bricks, and red is not surprisingly, also inconsistent at times. To add to the mix, ...


6

Again, Bricklink can help with the answer: When downloading the catalog, you specify "Part and Color Codes". This will give you a list of all part numbers and the color codes they have been produced in. To answer the question, some scripting has to be done to count lines with equal parts, etc. To make it short, this is the top 10 list: Duplo Brick 2x2 (53 ...


6

In my experience, this typically means you used the other colored part by accident somewhere else in the model, for example in a place where it is used on its own, and it was difficult to determine the exact color of the piece at that time. This happens a lot with colors like dark bluish gray, light bluish gray and pearl gray. You will need to go back ...


5

Every color used in LEGO over the years is listed on the official LEGO color chart at Peeron. It also includes CMYK, RGB and Pantone references.


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