25

A 1x1 cone with an inverted positioned screwdriver just might work here. So, I'm saying just might based off the the halved cast line of Peggy's head. The base peg of the horn/drill-bit would be too wide for the hole, but based off the cast fault line, which I hi-lighted in blue, there is a greater chance for the plastic halves to ease the slimmer screw ...


24

I think that is Part# 30046 : Window 1 x 2 x 2 2/3 Pane Lattice Diamond with Rounded Top


23

Looking at the pictures, I think Syberion has correctly identified the part. Just want to cover the moment where you mention part modification may be required. I don't think there is a need for modifications, it should work with existing parts like this: Additional parts are: Bar 1L with Clip Mechanical Claw Plate, Round 1 x 1 with Open Stud Lever Small ...


16

Brasso (yes, the metal polish) works wonders as far as removing print. Yes, you still have to rub it, but it won't damage or scratch the surface and it works fast. Just use a soft cloth, pour some Brasso on it and wipe away the print. Also, pure Eucalyptus Oil works really well. It requires a bit of soaking, but it will remove the print wonderfully and it ...


15

If the problem is that the base of the horn is too big to fit in the hole on the chanfron you have to make the former smaller or the latter bigger. Careful work with a file/scalpel, if you're good at that kind of thing. Remember that it's a lot easier to take a bit more off than to put a bit back. Odd that the bow doesn't use a standard size stud anyway (...


14

A possibility might be using Horse Battle Helmet (unicorn) parts 89524 or 13745: However I'm unsure if those would fit. The head geometry of the horse part in question (93083c01pb08) seems to be wider than the geometry of the horses in the castle sets (e.g. 10352c01pb03) If you're not afraid to modify (cut and/or bend) one of the horse helmets, they might ...


11

Well, I opened it up without much success, and took some pictures of the process: At first I tried pushing/prying the light grey tabs away from the dark gray "bottom", but those weren't budging So plan B: wedge it apart: It was opening, but I was also distorting the plastic in the process - perhaps if I had a hot air station or something, I could have of ...


11

The easiest way to do this is to score the baseplate with a straightedge and knife. Once you've made a deep enough cut, you should be able to bend and break the plate where you've scored it. You may want to sand the edge to clean it up a bit. There's a more detailed set of instructions in this Instructable.


9

In general the colors would take on a yellowish hue. The colors that are most damaged by sunlight are white and blue. White can turn all the way to dark tan, and blue will take on an ugly yellowish color. On the other hand red would fade into pink. But again; the sun does damage the bricks. They will turn brittle and somewhat powdery, like all plastics do. ...


9

The glue is one obvious thing, and I think they recently also experimented with a new sort of transparent stuff to paint the finished models with so that they would be more resistant to direct sunlight. I don't think they'll paint bricks to change their colour, though. However, In the same category of things any respectable AFOL would never do, I'm fairly ...


8

LEGOLAND builders appear to be quite "rules free" in their use of parts, as long as the final model looks as though it is made of LEGO. Not exactly a "part modification", but LEGOLAND builders have sometimes had access to parts in colors not available to regular builders. The builders often add lights or other mechanisms to their constructions. The moving ...


8

Depends on your tolerance. :) In the manufacture of LEGO bricks the machine tolerance is as small as 10 my (0.01 mm). Source: Company Profile. An introduction to the LEGO Group (2010) For me, 3D printing resolution would need to be pretty close to that.


7

Use clothing dye to change the color. It works for wear and tear. It doesn't wear off. It dyes the part rather than coating it.


7

It's a bit late, but in 2020 the Monkie Kid line contains a minifigure-sized pig head:


6

Online I would recommend BrickEngraver I think your best bet would be to find a local trophy shop, most will engrave items. Take them some LEGO to test and they should be able to provide what you need without the need to pay shipping.


6

According to WikiPedia: The moulds are permitted a tolerance of up to two micrometres, to ensure the bricks remain connected. But, as I noted in a comment, that is in an industrial environment, where great care is taken to ensure that not just a one-off piece is right, but that the entire batch of pieces is right. They probably take a six sigma approach ...


6

There is a fairly easy and cheap way to do this since you don't want real variable speed control. As you noted, connecting the AAA battery box directly to the PF train motor technically works, but the motor runs too fast. The default AAA battery box provides 9v from 6 AAA cells. Lowering this voltage will lower the speed of your motor. If you'd like to get ...


5

In my understanding of the question, you want to take an existing LEGO velociraptor and repaint it, but you are afraid that doing a custom paint job will rub off quickly. There is no easy solution for this, but here are a few tips: You could send an email to the guys at minifigs.me and see if they would be willing to help you with this, either as a one-off ...


5

First of all, if you are serious about this business, go to an IP lawyer who can take this up for you and give you a much more confident answer than the bunch of us LEGO fans can :) LEGO's Fair Use Policy is located here. Secondly, you might want to read the perspective in this thread on Bricksetforum. Lots of interesting points of view, and, decent ...


5

Pure eucalyptus oil works excellent, won't damage your minifigs, (and it smells good too!). You can get it in small bottles at health-food stores, pharmacies, and Asian stores. You don't need much, so a small bottle can last you a long time. Just pour a little of the oil on a piece of cotton or soft towel, and rub over the printed area you want to remove. ...


4

I am a principle in an imprinting facility, that services clients from automotive to toys and beyond: http://www.ableprint.com/ In the past couple of years we have had the opportunity to service companies that wanted us to print their designs on LEGO pieces. To make it easier for other users to get an idea what it would cost was to dedicate a web page to ...


4

I don't know where you got that image, but you could always try and print the brick using the dimensions shown. Using the brick (#32316) shown in your example it might be possible to produce a 3D model using the 32316.dat file that's available in the LDraw library. The next problem would be placing the brick in a model and exporting it as a file type that ...


4

The size won't matter in Paint, what will matter is the resolution of your printer. For example, if you want to print 1 inch by 1 inch, and your printer is 800 DPI, then you need an 800x800 image.


4

LEGO train motors get powered using a 9V cable. Philo (who also visits this site) has an excellent site with all the features and characteristics about the PowerFunctions motor system, which includes trains. This site is located at http://philohome.com/tech.htm. The speed of the train is regulated using PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) on the inside two wires (...


3

Your friend can get Queen Amidala at several shops based in Europe. Here are all the listings with the country of the shop: http://www.bricklink.com/catalogPG.asp?M=sw387. It might be also worth checking the eBay listings specific for their country. As far as Mario, LEGO never made an official one, however this UK based store does carry some: http://www....


3

I have actually tried 3d printing lego on a prusa i3 printer at I think 5 microns using PLA. I found that they worked fine initially but they quickly started to lose their grip. I think the issue was the layers grind against each other which wears them down rather than the brick walls flexing to grip. You certainly won't be getting anything close to the ...


3

I got good results using Soft Scrub with Bleach, an old towel, a Scotch-Brite scrubber sponge (the green and yellow one), a bottle brush, and a pile of Q-tips. Put a dollop of Soft Scrub on an old towel, dip the Lego piece in the cleanser, and rub 30-60 seconds on the scrubber side of the sponge. Check for results and keep rubbing until decoration is gone. ...


3

I tried Eucalyptus Oil a found on some figures it worked very slowly and took a lot of rubbing, while on other figures it worked on very quickly. I don't know what the difference in the figures paint/decal is or could be. I did find that Ethyl Alcohol (not Isopropyl, have not tested yet) worked fairly quickly with aggressive rubbing with a q-tip swab. I ...


3

The minifigures and the guns will be custom made. There are a number of sites that offer custom printed minifigs in military uniforms, and Brick Arms is a good place to start if you're after specific weapons. The LEGO Group have a policy of not creating "realistic" weapons, although both fantasy and futuristic are acceptable.


3

LIC is the Lego Instruction Creator it's a tool some people use to make instructions. I would say it's for "power users" though, so it may not be for you. If I were you I might change the title of this question to something indicative of your search for someone to do this work for you. As you are probably aware, there are Lego forums which are devoted ...


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