21

I reproduced the problem and got the axle out using a sculpting tool (similar to an awl). It's a sharp point made of hard metal. (Soft metal will actually bend, believe me, I tried three tools.) I inserted the point in the space left by the axle groove and pried the axle out. The point of the tool was against the axle while the body of the tool was pushing ...


19

You can use some sugar liquid to use as temporary glue to make the head stuck to the torso. Then wait till the sugar is sticky and then try to remove the helmet. Once the helmet is loose you can put the head and torso in warm water to loosen the sugar glue and take it off. Then wash thoroughly to remove remaining sugar.


17

If the helmet were jammed head-down, you can use a needle-nose pliers to grasp the edge of the tube in the inside of the racing helmet, as shown, and then pull them apart. You may need to twist them apart as you pull. In your case, since the helmet is jammed head-up, you need a way to push it out from the bottom. I suggest drilling a small hole through the ...


16

I usually attach it to a Technic beam, then put something to fill the hole so it can't squeeze together and come out, to give a handle. The flexible rods tend to be a nice options for filling the hole, the older ones may be a bit better, but I've had success with other pieces that fit minifig hands. Once you have the blue pin attached to the beam instead ...


14

I performed my own experiments to determine which methods work by randomly applying three stickers (which are similar to the stickers that come in LEGO sets) onto a simple brick wall. Using my finger nails to peel the stickers worked well. This is how I've always removed stickers and in my experience, I haven't had any problems doing so. Heating the brick ...


13

Push the Technic pin in a beam hole, then insert a rod (antenna or minifig tool handle) into the hole in the pin from the other side. The rod will prevent the "lips" of the pin from closing in, therefore preventing the pin from leaving the beam. Then you can pull on anything attached to the other end of the pin. This example below shows the removal of a pin ...


12

A trick that's worked for me in the past, is to use a 1x1 cone with a Technic axle in it (it needs to be the cone without the top groove, unlike the example below) - this will allow you to force the tapered end of the cone into the hole on the bottom of the head, and by fastening a Technic gearwheel, brick or larger cylinder to the Technic axle, you'll be ...


11

Well, I opened it up without much success, and took some pictures of the process: At first I tried pushing/prying the light grey tabs away from the dark gray "bottom", but those weren't budging So plan B: wedge it apart: It was opening, but I was also distorting the plastic in the process - perhaps if I had a hot air station or something, I could have of ...


10

Often in these cases, I have been able to flex the plate the piece is on a little. This allows you to get a fingernail or small tool under the lip of the thing in the middle of the larger plate. If you don't flex too much, you won't do any permanent damage to it.


10

Try using the orange brick separator upside down. This is a trick I learned from someone who professionally works with LEGO. The lower angle makes it easier to go under the lip of the tiles and it is much less damaging on the brick separator, as you are more pushing and sliding rather than digging and prying. To be clear, instead of holding the brick ...


10

Here are some disassembly pictures and tips. Tools needed: Either a precision flat-head or Philips screwdriver: There are two flat-head/Phillips hybrid screws that hold the the battery cover down. These two screws do not come completely out the battery cover. T9 Star Key: There are six T9 star screws. Four on the corners of the housing and two hidden ...


9

As I've said before in another answer, I find the #92585 Crowbar is the most versatile and is especially good at removing rubber bands from the #3736 (Technic, Steering Pulley Large) and the #4185 (Technic, Wedge Belt Wheel) elements. Don't use any sharp/metallic objects like a screwdriver or a pen knife as you may scratch the brick or sever the rubber band....


9

I figured out a solution while waiting for answers. The tool I used for it was a universal T20 bit which most people have or can easily get access to. I took some documenting pictures of it which I would like to share here.


9

Here's a YT vid on the disassembly, but the still picture shots with no commentary may not be what you need for a good walk-thru. I don't have a Hub, but wish we all had a pic to make sure we're talking about the same piece. Regardless, I'm gonna take a crazy shot at it. Let's Go! We have two gray rectangles: Big Gray Rectangle on the Left. Small Gray ...


8

I was able to successfully get that size band off of that pulley using this brick separator: I slid the sharp end in between the band and the pulley then worked it under the band and was able to pull the band off without damaging either part. If you don't have a brick separator handy, you can probably use a pointy minifig utensil such as a sword instead. I ...


8

In most cases it's best to to pry a brick by it's length (the bricks longest side). The base of the hinge brick can be removed with a crowbar. The crowbar brick can be found in many sets (particularly CITY Police sets) but I consider it to be the most versatile. There are many other minifig utensils that can be helpful in removing different types of ...


8

My son did some extensive research on this subject, which yielded this beauty: That’s a light bulb cover stuck into a Duplo stud. While it may look harmless, I found it impossible to get sufficient hold of the lightbulb before levering it out with a very thin screwdriver.


8

Ah, yes. I have had this problem a few times. Here's what I do: The first thing you're going to want is leverage. Connect one 1x6 plate to the underside of the Modified 1x1, one on top of the previous plate (but adjacent to the Modified 1x1), and one on top of both pieces. Next, slide propeller piece 32125 over the tip of the antenna. Hold the antenna ...


8

A good part of the LEGO experience is building the set. There is little joy in buying a LEGO set that was already built by someone else. So you are right, that a disassembled set is usually viewed as more valuable. However, consider the following points. When people purchase a LEGO set, either new or used, they expect the parts to be sorted in some way into ...


7

Your problem is that the clutch (what holds bricks together) between the helmet and the head is too high, and in any case higher than the clutch between head and torso. This means the solution is to increase the clutch between the head and another part you'll use to remove it. I would first recommend trying other torsos, maybe one has enough clutch to ...


7

A quick and easy way to remove a helmet stuck onto the head...I tried something similar to the toilet tissue paper idea above. I used a piece of Bounty kitchen roll, approximately 3cm x 3cm, (which is actually thicker then a single ply toilet tissue) and placed this over the stub of the body then pushed the head onto this. The head will not go all the way ...


7

Take your cross axle: And push it into the hole where your pin connector had stuck


7

It depends in what type of beams the pin are mounted. For studless Nicael's methode is the easiest. Otherwise you can use method 3 For studded beams you can use variation on this methode. take a axle of 6 or 8 long, 5 or 7 other beams and some plates. Stack the beam side by side and lock them together with the plates. Place the beam with the pin on top pin ...


7

The main trick is to simultaneously push all three pins of the hub: If you have another hub, and the wheel allows for this, take it and push carefully from the other side. If both hubs are half-way in, you should be able to pull out both. Otherwise, take two wedge belt wheels, align them on top of each other, insert a pin into every second hole and repeat ...


6

You need to get something into the head-hole to grip the head whilst you remove the helmet. You could try a pair of snap-ring pliers or needle nose pliers. Insert both jaws into the hole and pull them apart as much as possible whilst you remove the head from the helmet. You might need a helper - someone to remove the helmet whilst you grip the head with the ...


6

Take some scotch tape and wrap it round the neck thing. Then you just put the head on and pull the helmet off. If that doesn't work, use more tape, it will make the head stay on the neck a little better.


6

Using a cut-pipe into a clip-with-tube will let you build a secure and precise angle. If you have a solid brick behind the headlight bricks you can fix the angle by cutting the pipe at the right length.


6

I usually remove the door by folding it outwards until both points snap. I do it this way mainly because it's the quickest and easiest way. I've never had a door or frame break after doing this. If you really want the door/frame to last as long as possible, my first obvious suggestion would be to never disassemble the the two pieces unless you have to. A ...


6

I haven't tried these myself, but in the computer repair world there exist tools with similar purposes. Spudger: Flat edge (the right-size comes to a flat point): Knife-shaped edge: Opening Pick/Guitar Pick: NOTE: A number of companies manufacture these, but you would need to make sure you get ones that are sharp-enough to catch the lip on the tile.


6

It turns out it is real, just not from a single set itself, but from the official instructions for a combo-model between Exo-Force models 7700-1: Stealth Hunter and 7701-1: Grand Titan to make Mountain Warrior. You can find the pictured step on page 26 of the instructions.


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