20

If the helmet were jammed head-down, you can use a needle-nose pliers to grasp the edge of the tube in the inside of the racing helmet, as shown, and then pull them apart. You may need to twist them apart as you pull. In your case, since the helmet is jammed head-up, you need a way to push it out from the bottom. I suggest drilling a small hole through the ...


20

Here are some disassembly pictures and tips. Tools needed: Either a precision flat-head or Philips screwdriver: There are two flat-head/Phillips hybrid screws that hold the the battery cover down. These two screws do not come completely out the battery cover. T9 Star Key: There are six T9 star screws. Four on the corners of the housing and two hidden ...


19

My son did some extensive research on this subject, which yielded this beauty: That’s a light bulb cover stuck into a Duplo stud. While it may look harmless, I found it impossible to get sufficient hold of the lightbulb before levering it out with a very thin screwdriver.


18

Push the Technic pin in a beam hole, then insert a rod (antenna or minifig tool handle) into the hole in the pin from the other side. The rod will prevent the "lips" of the pin from closing in, therefore preventing the pin from leaving the beam. Then you can pull on anything attached to the other end of the pin. This example below shows the removal of a pin ...


16

I usually attach it to a Technic beam, then put something to fill the hole so it can't squeeze together and come out, to give a handle. The flexible rods tend to be a nice options for filling the hole, the older ones may be a bit better, but I've had success with other pieces that fit minifig hands. Once you have the blue pin attached to the beam instead ...


15

Take it for what it is, I am not a material scientist and this is not a guarantee that the following information will work in your case. I believe your approach is correct, or at least as good as you'll be able to get considering the material properties of the bricks and the glue. LEGO bricks are made of ABS plastic (at least after 1963). According to data ...


12

Try using the orange brick separator upside down. This is a trick I learned from someone who professionally works with LEGO. The lower angle makes it easier to go under the lip of the tiles and it is much less damaging on the brick separator, as you are more pushing and sliding rather than digging and prying. To be clear, instead of holding the brick ...


12

Let's take a look. The first step to disassembling the motor is removing the small Philips screw on the bottom: Now there are a pair of gray tabs in the back white section that we need to release. I found it easiest to cut them down with a knife. Once those are free, the white section slides backwards away from the motor. Try to do this gently, as there are ...


12

I was curious about this, and TLG was willing to provide me with one of these motors, so I opened it up. I was able to get the outer shell off by cutting down the 4 tabs on the outside. This motor does not appear to be meant to be opened and put back together. These tabs hold it together very firmly and I wasn't able to move them out of the way without ...


12

Self-answer to let you all know how things went. Warm water was having some effect but it took forever. So Saturday morning I went to the DIY store and got myself a 5 liter jerrycan of white vinegar. Taking my small test-clump I dropped it in a a bucket with a 50/50 mix of warm water and vinegar. In about 5 minutes the top 2-3 millimeter of the glue had ...


11

Well, I opened it up without much success, and took some pictures of the process: At first I tried pushing/prying the light grey tabs away from the dark gray "bottom", but those weren't budging So plan B: wedge it apart: It was opening, but I was also distorting the plastic in the process - perhaps if I had a hot air station or something, I could have of ...


10

A 1x1 round plate on the bottom of a 1x1 square plate is pretty difficult to get apart. The Santa's Workshop set uses transparent 1x1 round plates stuck until 1x1 plates with a clip on top to make Christmas lights. I just left the whole thing assembled; I'll probably never bother taking that apart. Also: if you stick some brand-new 4x4 plates together it ...


9

I figured out a solution while waiting for answers. The tool I used for it was a universal T20 bit which most people have or can easily get access to. I took some documenting pictures of it which I would like to share here. EDIT: Use a plastic LEGO rod as zovits and others recommend. If you don't have that, use metal tools as a last resort. And if using a ...


9

Here's a YT vid on the disassembly, but the still picture shots with no commentary may not be what you need for a good walk-thru. I don't have a Hub, but wish we all had a pic to make sure we're talking about the same piece. Regardless, I'm gonna take a crazy shot at it. Let's Go! We have two gray rectangles: Big Gray Rectangle on the Left. Small Gray ...


8

It depends in what type of beams the pin are mounted. For studless Nicael's methode is the easiest. Otherwise you can use method 3 For studded beams you can use variation on this methode. take a axle of 6 or 8 long, 5 or 7 other beams and some plates. Stack the beam side by side and lock them together with the plates. Place the beam with the pin on top pin ...


8

Take your cross axle: And push it into the hole where your pin connector had stuck


8

Ah, yes. I have had this problem a few times. Here's what I do: The first thing you're going to want is leverage. Connect one 1x6 plate to the underside of the Modified 1x1, one on top of the previous plate (but adjacent to the Modified 1x1), and one on top of both pieces. Next, slide propeller piece 32125 over the tip of the antenna. Hold the antenna ...


7

A quick and easy way to remove a helmet stuck onto the head...I used a piece of Bounty kitchen roll, approximately 3cm x 3cm, (which is actually thicker then a single ply toilet tissue) and placed this over the stub of the body then pushed the head onto this. The head will not go all the way down, but far enough for it to remain firmly in place. Then I was ...


7

The main trick is to simultaneously push all three pins of the hub: If you have another hub, and the wheel allows for this, take it and push carefully from the other side. If both hubs are half-way in, you should be able to pull out both. Otherwise, take two wedge belt wheels, align them on top of each other, insert a pin into every second hole and repeat ...


7

It turns out it is real, just not from a single set itself, but from the official instructions for a combo-model between Exo-Force models 7700-1: Stealth Hunter and 7701-1: Grand Titan to make Mountain Warrior. You can find the pictured step on page 26 of the instructions.


7

A good part of the LEGO experience is building the set. There is little joy in buying a LEGO set that was already built by someone else. So you are right, that a disassembled set is usually viewed as more valuable. However, consider the following points. When people purchase a LEGO set, either new or used, they expect the parts to be sorted in some way into ...


7

My back wheels do the same thing. There is no metal axle that connects both back wheels like the axle design does for the front wheels, but I'm sure LEGO designed it that way. So, imagine the train's motor being in an "ON" state just a rolling. Now enters a kid, just being a kid. Grabs the thing, and starts a rolling in whichever direction kiddie wants ...


7

Any part that has a stud on the surface can be fairly easily removed by using leverage from a different large part added to the top of it. This takes advantage of the inherent "clutch power" of the stud/anti-stud connection and the increased surface area of the larger part to concentrate the force used to remove the part in a lateral direction. For ...


7

I'm struggling to understand why would there be a need to insert 24T gear inside turntable gear. If you need rigid connection - it is best to use existing attachment points for you assembly. Internal gearing works with 8T gears. 3 of them could be used in line to have planetary gearing (actually, two is enough, but to make thing a little more rigid 3 are ...


7

Indeed I had to disassemble it (which went without much effort) but the 24 tooth fits fine: It can slip up or down for about half a stud but is stuck otherwise.


6

Here is an alternative 'pin-pusher' that I put together using as few pieces as I could (except for a few tiles to make it a bit more intersting). The blue pin near the centre pushes pins out half way, just enough to remove the pins by hand and not to far for it to pop up out in the air. The two tan axles help to align the Technic beam you are using, I ...


6

I once got myself into a situation much like this. What I did was unfold a paperclip and insert the end of it into one of the four corners of open space of the hole that one of the axles was in. Then, I pulled the part of the paper clip out in such a way as to make the most friction between the paper clip and the axle, causing the axle to slide out a bit. I ...


6

Take some scotch tape and wrap it round the neck thing. Then you just put the head on and pull the helmet off. If that doesn't work, use more tape, it will make the head stay on the neck a little better.


6

I just removed a non-LEGO crown which was very very tight top on Nadakhan's head. It was so tight, it seemed that only destroying it could help. But my son loved the crown and especially head, so here is my solution: I put some olive oil between the crown and the head I took a paper napkin and put it over a LEGO torso's neck I put the head stuck on the neck ...


6

Using a cut-pipe into a clip-with-tube will let you build a secure and precise angle. If you have a solid brick behind the headlight bricks you can fix the angle by cutting the pipe at the right length.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible