8

IR Transmitter Tower exist in both USB version as well as Serial cable version. Page 7 of instructions for one of the sets (3804) that was using USB version has following explanation: Transcription: The IR Tower establishes a wireless link between your computer and the RCX. With the IR Tower, programs can be downloaded from computer to RCX. These programs ...


7

If we open the hub we can take a look at the main PCB inside. There's just one PCB in addition to a small speaker and the replaceable lithium ion battery. Here's the top of the PCB: And the bottom: We see that the main CPU is an STM32F413. It includes 1M of flash and 320k of RAM and the ARM Cortex M4 core can be clocked up to 100MHz. In addition to the 1M ...


7

I don't have this part, so I can't directly give you the photos that you are looking for, but there is at least one teardown video floating around that we can use to see what is inside the BuWizz 2.0 module. Power The module contains 2x 850mAh LiPo batteries: PCB The top of the PCB looks something like this: I wasn't able to find an image showing the ...


6

They are protective locks. If something (let’s say kids hair, or part of their clothes) gets stuck and dragged inside the wheel, these tiny blocks will lock the wheels and make sure it doesn’t keep dragging whatever is stuck. As soon as you pull the stuck part back, the springs unlock.


5

LEGO doesn't make something to directly facilitate this type of integration as far as I know. If you can get a PF extension wire, you could cut it and directly make the connections to your driver circuit. You can drive the motor using the middle wires of the PF cable (C1 and C2). For what its worth, I would personally prefer an H-bridge such as this one ...


5

Yes, a smart device is required. The box says the following: Smart device required but not included However, this set is not like Boost, where the intelligent brick just adds weight to your model without a smart device. Mario functions without being paired to a smart device. He can complete the course, collect coins, etc. The most significant limitation ...


5

For the first switch I bent the legs of the button and splayed them out just a little bit. Next I stripped off the caps of two Dupont connectors, ran them through the headlight bricks and connected the button upside down. An axle will trigger the button. Either one with a stud on one end (and a 1x1 tile) or a regular one with a half bush. A 2x2 brick on ...


3

If you prefer C#, there a new lib on the block: SharpBrick.PoweredUp. While the Boost hub and motors are missing, the protocol is implemented. Your use case should be two minor contributions away. Full Disclaimer: I maintain the library. I do not have Boost Hardware but the protocol officially supports Boost Hub. Just some enums and types are missing.


3

Why they exist: to transmit programs from your computer to the Mindstorms smart brick (which is really another, probably smaller, computer). This was before USB ubiquity, and it also prevented children from plugging and unplugging a cable at the back of their computer, which is a dangerous move, even for adults.


2

I don't have this set, so I can't provide a fully authoritative answer, but 9V is likely to be safe for these motors. The hub that drives them is definitely 9V, as it connects with the rest of the 9V system and runs on 6 AA batteries: TLG typically overspecs their motors somewhat, so you could probably also get away with running the motor using 12 volts, ...


2

Could you use one of the Lego touch sensors: Electric, Sensor, Touch Trans-Light Blue Electric, Sensor, Touch with Red Contact Trans-Light Blue Electric, Sensor, Touch with White Contact Trans-Light Blue Electric, Sensor, Touch with Yellow Contact Black Electric, Sensor, Touch 4.5V Yellow Electric, Sensor, Touch with Non-Removable Lead Here's a proof of ...


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