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32

Although it can be done (I will share below), I would sincerely discoure you from gluing your LEGO sets. You will very much regret it later. Here are the reasons why: LEGO is meant to be a building toy - put together and taken apart many times. Once you glue a set it completely looses its usefulness and becomes nothing but another item to take up the shelf ...


15

Take it for what it is, I am not a material scientist and this is not a guarantee that the following information will work in your case. I believe your approach is correct, or at least as good as you'll be able to get considering the material properties of the bricks and the glue. LEGO bricks are made of ABS plastic (at least after 1963). According to data ...


14

You could always put a screw through a 2x2 plate and use it to fix the corners, the rounded corners on the road plates won't be damaged, and you only lose a very small, cheap part.


13

Have you considered screwing your decorations to the metal stand, using Technic brick holes to pass the screws? If done properly no harm is done to the bricks, and you will not fear a bad glue joint!


12

Self-answer to let you all know how things went. Warm water was having some effect but it took forever. So Saturday morning I went to the DIY store and got myself a 5 liter jerrycan of white vinegar. Taking my small test-clump I dropped it in a a bucket with a 50/50 mix of warm water and vinegar. In about 5 minutes the top 2-3 millimeter of the glue had ...


11

MEK is the way to go - it's what the Masterbuilders at the LEGOLAND parks use. I once brought a miniland sized model from London to the US in my main suitcase that had been glued with MEK and the model was fully intact when I got to the other end! As others have said, it is VERY nasty when breathed in. Do not even think about using it in confined spaces ...


10

I mounted baseplates to a sheet of plywood in order to hang a mosaic as follows: Roughly sand the plywood and the backs of the baseplates. Squirt a generous helping of Liquid Nails on one of the surfaces. Lay out your baseplates on the plywood using regular plates as spacers (i.e., attach plates across the boundaries between two baseplates in order to ...


8

I would say low temp hot glue. I have done this for several my son really wanted to "keep". I figure one day he will be able to take it apart but it saves it from dropping and such!


7

Your question doesn't explain why you want to glue the models for a 4 year old, so I'm going to go ahead and advocate that you don't glue and instead let your 4 year old build. 4 years old is a great time to be learning the fine motor skills, geometry, physics, colour and esthetics, not to mention creativity and storytelling. Gluing the models takes away ...


7

LEGO plates are made from ABS plastic, as are plastic shower surround materials. Buy a caulk tube of shower surround adhesive (I have used loctite power grab from Home Depot $5). Scuff the back of the LEGO plates with some sandpaper and apply the adhesive with a fine notched trowel and slap it on your wood ;) Gently press any lumps out. To date I've made 4 ...


7

Yes, you can sell used LEGO sets. In fact there is huge market for such sets due to, relatively, high product value even on second-hand market. People use local classifieds for local sales as well as global platforms like eBay, Bricklink for greater exposure. Could I make a profit legally if it isn't MOC? It is worth noting, some used sets tend to sell for ...


5

I'm always hesitant to recommend gluing LEGO as it is so much against the spirit of LEGO. Have you considered using the magnet bricks? They come in several regular LEGO brick sizes, and they stick to metal surfaces just fine. If you must use glue, most glues will readily stick to the plastic, so that is no problem. What you need to check is what glues work ...


4

Have you considered using velcro-strips? You can cut it to whatever size you want and it won't permanently damage your basepalces like glue wood. And there is also various versions of two-sided tape. Some of them are very strong and can even hold picture-frames on walls. So they should definitely hold baseplates down.


4

So I've been referring to this post for a long time and I figured it is time to put in my experiences. One thing that many answers don't talk about is that different glues are good for different purposes so my input will revolve around that. A little background. I've been building Lego for multiple decades though only recently started using glue as I've ...


4

I use Kragle for putting together the Lego kits, but not any of the removeable pieces or the lego figures. I use a medium viscosity kind of Cyanoacrylate hobby glue. Just have to be careful to not get it on your fingers and your eyes.


4

A better way to preserve LEGO is to put it in some sort of display case. It maintains the value and keeps the dust off.


4

It's probably not the best option to use no: according to Wikipedia, glue guns tend to operate at the following temperatures: Low-temperature glue guns operate at approximately 120°C (248°F) [...] High-temperature guns operate at approximately 190°C (374 °F) LEGO and Mega Bloks' primary component, ABS, has a melting point around 105°C (221°F), which is a ...


4

With “services”, do you mean someone who would come out to your house and rebuild the sets for you? As intriguing as that sounds, I do not believe something like that exists. Your best bet is to grab an instruction manual and start rebuilding from the pieces. Once you have a few sets built this way, it’ll become easier to rebuild the remaining sets. For sets ...


3

I have had success with super glue (LocTite). I recommend it because: You don't need much glue to get it solidly attached. This means, if you are careful, no mess or cleanup, and no worry of bulging or unevenness of the plate. It adheres extremely fast, so there is no need for clamping. You can just press it together by hand for a half a minute. If you don'...


3

Many thanks for all your help and ideas. We have experimented with gorilla glue and a couple of others but settled on two part Araldite Rapid, which doesn't take long to set. As they are tree decorations that we are selling to raise funds to build a new building (our old one is rotting away!) they needed to be fairly robust. Sorry that we are sticking ...


3

Is there a specific scenario in which it should be unbreakable? You definitely should use different techniques to prevent a spaceship from falling apart when dropped from a meter and to prevent a brick wall from separating when hit by a rolling football. For System bricks using larger, longer bricks in overlapping configuration (think real life bricklaying) ...


3

This is really nearly impossible unless you have a lifetime supply of super glue. A good structure using Technic LEGO bricks will provide better support and a lot more "stick" to each other, making the creation less breakable. Building the structure in which the strongest side will take the most hits/pressure should be an excellent way to make the model ...


3

Unfortunately older stickers are difficult to remove and reapply because the sticky part of the paper tend to rip off and leave a residue on the LEGO element itself. But the fact of the matter is that applying that taking off and re-applying even a new sticker is a challenge and it will almost always be visibly damaged at least a little bit. Your best bet ...


3

There are three factors you have to consider here: the possible chocking hazard for your child, the possible toxicity of the glue to your child, and the degree of removability of the glue. I don't think there exist a glue that is (1) completely secure (i.e. won't allow small parts to become chocking hazards), (2) safe to be handled and possibly ingested, ...


3

AFAIK those "bead glues" work on a completely different principle where the sheen on the individual beads is a water-activated glue and so the finished piece needs to be sprayed with just clean water to adhere the beads together. There are a number of "weak glues" known which could be worth a try: thick sugar syrup (naturally water soluble, thus removable) ...


2

As Nick says, LEGO System is probably not quite the right toy for a 4 year old. LEGO Duplo or possibly the new LEGO Juniors range would be better. LEGO obviously caution about the small parts on almost all System sets. However, if you're looking for a temporary glue for now, then I'd probably go with a water based glue such as PVA that you'll eventually be ...


2

To remove stickers, I use lighter fluid. However, it can damage plastics, and I've never used it on LEGO bricks before, so please test it first. Apply the lighter fluid to the sticker, and use a sharp metal object (like an X-Acto Knife) to slowly pry the sticker from the brick. You will probably have to regularly apply the lighter fluid as new parts of ...


2

Full disclosure, I invented this product so I am bias. But it works, and I've used it on my own Legos. I know this was posted in 2013, but if anyone is still looking for a solution on how to temporarily bond your Lego creations together try Spray and Play. http://www.sprayandplaytoys.com/ Spray and Play is a water soluble (you can wash it off), ASTM non-...


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