Hot answers tagged

46

The answer I've heard the most (with a source citing the official confirmation) is that green, brown and gray bricks were omitted from the LEGO palette because the company wanted to discourage kids from building tanks, planes, and other realistic military hardware.


38

The earliest LEGO sets did not have any kind of instruction manuals, since they were sold as sets of building blocks, without any specific models in mind. Exmaple: Set #7002, Automatic Binding Bricks from 1949 In 1955, the first sets have arrived that were intended to be built as some specific model, like 1237-2: Service Station I can't find any ...


26

Early LEGO colors were inspired by the work of Mondriaan, which mainly consists of white, black, red, blue and yellow. These primary colors were considered to be most appealing to kids. From the book “Brick by Brick”: The new product was patented in 1958 and within a few years bright yellow, red and blue Lego bricks, colours inspired by the paintings ...


26

It looks like part of the old 9-Volt motor that was made from 1990 and 2002. The full thing's part number is listed as 2838 which I assume is the mold ID stamped on dark grey base, while 2837 is the mold ID of the top part. I don't think it's supposed to come apart, it looks like there are 4 clips on each sides which have been broken off of your piece.


22

1977 When Technic was first introduced. Check out this alternative build of set 850:


22

Further to Alex's answer, from that source I found eleven colours that only lasted a year: Fabuland Orange 1983 Very Light Orange 2000 Clikits Lavender 2005 Chrome Black 2009 Chrome Green 1999 Satin White 2020 Satin Trans-Light Blue 2020 Satin Trans-Dark Pink 2020 Glitter Trns-Orange 2020 Speckle Black-Copper 2006 Speckle DBGray-Silver 2006 Of course the ...


18

According to Bricklink, Very Light Orange was only used by single part for one year only - in 2000. It was used in 2 sets (Scala and Belville) and 1 "gear". That part is this cat: Another color is Clikits Lavender used by a number of parts (9, to be precise) for Clikits theme and these were produced in 2005. Here's a picture by Ryan Howerter


15

A practical engineering concern could be a reason to limit the colours used for molding in ABS plastic. The colourant added to the base plastic can affect the physical properties of the molded part. Depending on how tight the dimensional tolerances are for the finished part a separate mold may be required for each colour. Perhaps the Lego group process ...


14

I have a background in precision injection moulding, although not to the extremely tight tolerances of Lego. Here's why a manufacturer would try to reduce the number of colours they used, particularly in the old days. Most resin (the raw material) nowadays comes pre-coloured, especially for a large customer like Lego. That wasn't the case fifty or sixty ...


13

Brickipedia (A.K.A. lego.wikia.com) list unreleased sets and themes in the form of an article and category of articles. It does mention CYBOTS and Europa in addition to Seatron, although there is no guarantee that the list is complete. CYBOTS Contained action figures using both System and the first TECHNIC ball joint parts. Several prototype models ...


12

Why design the core monorail hardware this way? This is hard to answer without a degree of speculation, but I assume that the core reason behind the decision to design the monorail this way likely came down to cost and engineering challenges. TLG wanted to allow for a monorail train to be able to navigate inclines effectively. This required: A cog system ...


12

LEGO does not directly create military sets. A LEGO representative gave the following reason: Are there any chances that Lego will ever start producing modern day warfare Lego, with tanks and helicopters and what not? We have a strict policy regarding military models, and therefore, we do not produce tanks, helicopters, etc. While we always support ...


12

It's to make them fit with the original Technic bricks which have an even number of studs and the holes go in-between.


11

I asked Gary Istok on your behalf in this Brickset Forum thread, who is an expert on LEGO's history. He said the following: When LEGO replaced the Cellulose Acetate bricks circa 1963 with ABS plastic for non-trans parts, and polycarbonate for the trans ones, they had a problem with the red and yellow parts. For some reason (I'm not a chemical ...


10

Please forgive the length of this but I was careful to check all the facts from the graphic and include source information. All information in this infographic, except for those that follow below, can be confirmed from the Wikipedia.org page devoted to minifigs: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lego_minifigure. I would not deny that Wikipedia can contain ...


10

You can find some of The LEGO Group's financial information in their annual report. Note that the financials are in Danish kroner, so you'll need to do some currency conversion. For example, the net profit for 2012 was 5.6 billion DKK, which works out to about 1 billion USD. I'm not aware of a reliable way to get official sales numbers for individual ...


10

The official story is that Ole Kirk Kristiansen didn't realise until years after naming the company what it meant in Latin (normally it's said to mean "I put together", not "I collect"), and as there was no construction over the products made in the first many years, it seems unlikely that he should have thought along those lines.


10

The BrickLink Catalog, which is the most comprehensive database of LEGO parts ever made, lists the first official stickers from 1971. They were used in the Homemaker sets to decorate furniture, etc. List of LEGO Stickers Sorted by Year Interestingly, at the same time (early '70s), the large Homemaker figures had printed faces, but the first minifigures (...


9

Not really an answer, just a small point of fact..... There were actually 4 Monorail Trains planned, a Futuron Space-Themed one, a Unitron Space-Themed one, the ever pleasant Airport Shuttle Town-Themed one, (good for cities, even by today's standards, as building a large scale Monorail using brick-build tracks and Power Functions is a little too labor ...


9

Page was owner of the patent only for Great Britain, allowing LEGO to use the design worldwide. Buying a "rival" company (Kiddicraft) later on is nothing unusual in business history. Therefore, blaming Page's death on LEGO does not make much sense. Regarding chinese brands, one has to make a difference between using a compatible plastic brick system (which ...


9

I don't know whether this quite qualifies as a set, but there is a LEGO promotional Christmas box from 1964 listed on bricklink


8

A quick search on Bricklink gives the following results: Catalog: Parts: Minifig, Head: Search Results for dual sided Unknown year (41) 2001 (1) 2002 (10) 2005 (4) 2006 (7) 2007 (4) 2008 (4) 2009 (18) 2010 (27) 2011 (43) 2012 (86) 2013 (90) 335 Total Parts (View All) This search was caried out at http://www.bricklink.com Assuming that the Bricklink data ...


8

Every Lego wooden duck I have seen, whether in person or on the internet, is sitting on a platform with the wheels attached to the platform. This is the original version: Here is a later version: Are there any markings on the toy itself that lead you to believe it is a Lego product?


8

If you look at the quantity of parts in all sets, the most common is the 1x2 brick ignoring color. The most common part and color combo is the Techhnic pin with friction in black. These stats were pulled from Rebrickable's database - they previously had a "Stats" page, but this has since been replaced with their API.


8

It does not seem as if it would ever be possible to come to a definitive assertion—or even a sufficiently precise approximation—of "how many LEGO bricks exists." For the English Wikipedia article "Lego" in the "Manufacturing" section informs, Annual production of Lego bricks averages approximately 36 billion, or about 1140 elements per second. Although ...


8

I'm going to stretch your definition of "set" and say "32x32 green baseplate". You could get set 745-1 in 1978... ...then 840-1 in 1980, then 813-1 in 1986, then 626-1 in 1996: And since 2015 there's 10700-1, altough it seems that the shade of green is different than the previous iterations: Since those sets have exactly the same piece count (one) and ...


8

There have been Christmas-themed sets for a long time, for example set 246-2 Santa and Sleigh from 1977. Scrolling through all LEGO sets on Brickset, starting from 1949, shows that this is also the first set in their records that is Christmas themed, together with the (likely unreleased) two Santas set 245-2.


8

Based on my experience throughout pretty much the entirety of the 90s, they didn't really look all that different back then regarding the style, what you would call the "Auto CAD" look I guess. The primary differences are that they didn't list all the required parts for each build step (although Technic already did that back then, presumably ...


7

While the current plastic Lego "guns" are generally more tame (blasters, pirate pistols), that was not the case with wooden toys from the 1940's including this machine gun from 1945. It's about 18" long and makes a rat-tat-tat sound when turning the crank.


7

The exact details of the business agreements between LEGO and the companies whose names and logos it has license to use are confidential, but we can infer some general information. The sets LEGO has produced that feature an oil company name or logo fall into three general categories: Sets produced by LEGO with only the branding of the oil company and ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible