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Since you'll be working at a scale you may prefer to use graph paper. You can print your own if you don't have any, this will make it easier. Use a ruler, pencil and a rubber to draw your microfigure. A microfigure is roughly 2/7 legs, 2/7 torso and 3/7 head high, It should also be 3 squares wide. You may find the diagram below makes it easier to visualise:...


8

When looking at the inventory of one of the LEGO games (as if you were missing a part), you can see these are clearly labelled "MICRO FIGURE" On Bricklink they are known as 'Microfig', Lego Digital Designer refers to them as 'Micro Figure.


7

As you say, the figures used in the LEGO Games are called Micro-figures - these appear to be based on LEGO Part 90398 - Minifig Trophy Statuette, while Marcus refers to them as "Tiny Figures" in his video, the press release that is talked about on most of the sites calls them "micro-figures" as well - I guess LEGO can't call them "Nano-Figures" as that would ...


7

Microfigures. Described by LEGO as "Microfigures...The Minifigures for Minifigures!" As far as useability go, it is true that within the Games theme they are only used as pawns/game pieces. However, in recent years, they've seen larger use. for example, in the 2012 Star Wars set "Palpatine's Arrest", it is used unprinted in pearl gold to represent a statue/...


6

I suggest calling them "trophy figures". Here is my reasoning: First, we need to understand a key term: Microscale. In Lego terms, microscale means anything smaller than minifig scale. Here is the definition from the Lego MBA Designer Handbook: Kit 2 - Microbuild Designer: By that definition, both the traditional "microfig" found in the games and a few ...


4

Take a look at: How to Draw a Lego Minifigure with Easy Step by Step Drawing Tutorial How to Draw LEGO Men How to Draw a LEGO Personally number 3 looks like the best bet to me.


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