22

It seems like you understand why there are unique minifigs, but I'll point it out explicitly anyway. Unique minifigs add character to sets, and add to playability. For example, I always wanted this guy as a kid: Without him, my pirates were just a leaderless band, but once they have a fearless leader with a peg leg and hook, things become a lot more ...


22

You can use some sugar liquid to use as temporary glue to make the head stuck to the torso. Then wait till the sugar is sticky and then try to remove the helmet. Once the helmet is loose you can put the head and torso in warm water to loosen the sugar glue and take it off. Then wash thoroughly to remove remaining sugar.


22

Three 1x1 plates, two 1x1 round bricks, and one 1x1 plate with clip.


19

It's kinda chunky, but the best I can come up with is 42446 + 2555: + = It would leave a half-plate gap on one side if they only have 1 holster though, but at-least you keep the regular minifig legs. NOTE: This probably wouldn't be considered a "legal" connection, due to the semi-octagonal shape of the leg connectors. It's definitely possible to put ...


18

There are already quite a few multi-armed minifigures. I usually won't count Doctor Octopus as one, though. But I'll count it this time. The very first minifigure to be able to hold more than 2 tools is Doctor Octopus, from the "Spider-Man" theme from 2004. This was achieved by building a harness that goes on the neck. This version appeared in 4 ...


17

There are a few on Bricklink, if you search by part colour: 3626bpb212 3626bpb159 3626bpb749 3626bpb424 3626bpb214 3626bpb573 3626cpb1088 3626cpb1124 3626cpb1067 3626cpb0906 And the standard smiley is also available. If you search for the older Brown colour (instead of the current Reddish Brown) you find that there are basically ...


15

Hand colors other than yellow are generally used to either match skin tone in licensed themes, or to represent some sort of gloves. The police officer you mentioned is probably "wearing" some sort of motorcycle or driving glove: When minifigs were first introduced in the late 70s, the only ones to have non-yellow hands were the space minifigs:


15

Head: Is Part #3626cpb0704, which appears in any of these 24 sets. Torso: Is from Set #76007-1 Iron Man: Malibu Mansion Attack. Specifically, the "Extremis Soldier" minifig chest piece.


14

Here is another way to consider it: Make a fist, and don't bend your wrist. The pinky's side of your hand is mostly aligned with the rest of your wrist and forearm. The thumb's side of your hand is not so much aligned with your wrist and forearm. Also notice that the curve of your fingers tapers toward the pinky finger. Now compare to the minifigure ...


14

Your second guess was correct. It's not just a wrench. It's listed as a Screwdriver/spanner on Lego.com: This part was also included in several sets in the Games line as a human tool to remove tiles from the dice. It's unclear (at least to me) whether this part was intended to be used for tile removal when it was introduced in 1979. Here's an example from ...


14

Proving a negative is hard, so disclaimer first: This answer is neither exhaustive, nor definitive. My line of reasoning starts from the assumption that if there were ever standalone minifigure hands, they would appear in the set inventory in a way that is not explainable based on the number of minifigures. Of course, this assumption is not 100% waterproof,...


13

I can not give you an answer on behalf of TLG, but I can give you some good reasons as to why Minifigures do not have ears. Authenticity: Lego figures have never had ears. In fact, the first figures did not even have faces, or articulating limbs. They were very basic. Here is a photo showing the basic evolution of minifigures over the years. The first '...


13

As a conservative approach I would suggest the LEGO Juniors series which has cars and other sets and that are easy to build. However, from first hand experience I can tell that kids learn quickly. Even if reading instructions is too difficult, playing with regular LEGO parts will soon be a lot of fun. Besides : Losing small parts will be an issue with ...


13

These items are from different sets. Let's begin with the most obvious - minifigure. It is a Royal Guard from Star Wars and there are couple of versions of them. Yours seems to be with arms and hands in Dark Red. Yet, there are still two version of them (depends on the type of cape you got): Royal Guard with Dark Red Arms and Hands was part of two sets in ...


12

As a child, I was really into Star Wars and had lots of star wars figures. However, it was always annoying that Star Wars vehicles and playsets didn't come with figures. The Ewok Village has no Ewoks in it. The X-Wing has no pilot. Etc. This policy let Kenner (now Hasbro) sell the figures at full retail on a per-figure basis and let collectors buy only what ...


12

A trick that's worked for me in the past, is to use a 1x1 cone with a Technic axle in it (it needs to be the cone without the top groove, unlike the example below) - this will allow you to force the tapered end of the cone into the hole on the bottom of the head, and by fastening a Technic gearwheel, brick or larger cylinder to the Technic axle, you'll be ...


11

The minifigs are what is known in the retail trade as 'blind-packed collectables'. They're sold at 'pocket money' prices in newsagents and bookshops at aisle ends or counter-tops. The idea is to encourage people (mainly children but adults too) to try and 'collect' a complete set. The opaque bags encourage this by making this goal harder to reach, and ...


11

Here are three options that have what you are looking for: 1) Brickset has the highest quality and best organized photographs of minifigs, but they are far from complete. For example, as of this writing, the gallery does not have any of the City theme figures. The collection is growing all the time. For example, here is their collection of Batman figures: ...


11

The stands you see aren't actually part of the set. They're there to make it easier to photograph the minifigs, and get photoshopped out in the final version of the set pictures.


10

I'm fairly confident that your guess is the correct one: manufacturing issues. If each minifigure of a series were to be produced separately, they would be considered as 16 different sets for all production and inventory purposes. As a box, they are considered as only one set, which suits LEGO better as there is less overhead. Logistically, it makes sense ...


10

Please forgive the length of this but I was careful to check all the facts from the graphic and include source information. All information in this infographic, except for those that follow below, can be confirmed from the Wikipedia.org page devoted to minifigs: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lego_minifigure. I would not deny that Wikipedia can contain ...


9

LEGO typically does not sell individual minifigures from its licensed themes due to licensing restrictions. Often, another company has an exclusive license to produce action figures from a franchise, which means that LEGO is only allowed to sell building sets. These may contain figures, but there has to be a real buildable component. That's why we see "...


9

The figure on the left is generally referred to as a Fabuland figure, although I believe that the entire Fabuland line actually featured animals. There were a few basic sets released in the 80s that included human Fabuland-style figures. That one is probably from this fire engine: Before the introduction of the Minifig in 1978, there was the Maxifig that ...


9

It's one of the Indians from the Western theme, from 1997: http://brickset.com/minifigs/ww016/Indian-Tan-Shirt-Quiver


9

You can find all the minifigs heads ever made, with the date of release, in the BrickLink catalog: http://www.bricklink.com/catalogList.asp?pg=1&catString=238&catType=P&v=2 Please note that I have already sorted the minifigs heads in the link above by year released, however on the first two pages of the results you will see heads where the year ...


8

It's a "Turntable Spinning with Sports Trick Handle 2 x 24 x 4 1/3". I found that on BrickLink via browsing by colour, since there aren't a lot of tan parts and most of the categories are obviously not applicable (it's not a tile, for example). That page also lists the sets it came in (two of them), but none of the pictures show that part. But once you have ...


8

Minifigs from licensed sets are made to look like their license counterparts, so there are some there, most notably Star Wars Mace Windu and Lando Calrissian which have both been made in 4 different versions. There's also one in Prince of Persia: Seso, and maybe you can count the gunner zombie from Pirates of the Carribean. As for non-licensed sets, I don'...


8

It is unlikely that Lego mispacked all of the minifigures. In the Quinjet set, the figures are spread among several bags, meaning Lego would have had a packing error in multiple bags, and then coincidentally placed all of the mispacked bags into the same box. More likely is that someone removed them from the box and returned the package to the store. If I ...


8

Your problem is that the clutch (what holds bricks together) between the helmet and the head is too high, and in any case higher than the clutch between head and torso. This means the solution is to increase the clutch between the head and another part you'll use to remove it. I would first recommend trying other torsos, maybe one has enough clutch to ...


8

A quick search on Bricklink gives the following results: Catalog: Parts: Minifig, Head: Search Results for dual sided Unknown year (41) 2001 (1) 2002 (10) 2005 (4) 2006 (7) 2007 (4) 2008 (4) 2009 (18) 2010 (27) 2011 (43) 2012 (86) 2013 (90) 335 Total Parts (View All) This search was caried out at http://www.bricklink.com Assuming that the Bricklink data ...


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