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26

A fan is just 1/4 of a drone, right? Check out this lego drone that actually flies, for inspiration. https://youtu.be/wUVvQk7XLd4 The blade part in question is 89509


17

The easiest way to do this would be to use a motor with a high speed (or gear up a lower speed motor) and then attach one of the larger propeller elements to it. You can probably build a custom prop, but it might be challenging to build something with the proper blade angle while keeping it light and strong enough to not break apart when rotating quickly. ...


16

YES! Philippe Hurbain (Philo) has put together a great and very detailed write-up on those and many other LEGO 9V electric motors. You can find it here: LEGO 9V Technic Motors compared characteristics Your current draw for that specific motor @ 9V is: No load: 65mA Loaded (3.6 N.cm): 310mA Loaded (6.0 N.cm): 480mA Stalled (11 N....


11

The LEGO customer service does provide replacements for defective parts, but only for parts which are still in production. Sometimes you'll need to send the broken part back to them. They don't repair the parts as such, just replace them. As for the micromotor, you're out of luck as it's not produced anymore. They might provide another motor as a ...


10

It's the main module from Record and Play (set 4095): This part was only included in this set released in 2003. The part contains several motors and some electronics that allow you to record motor movements and then play them back. Pressing the red button would let you record movements for a maximun of 20 seconds by adjusting the motors and the green ...


10

If you're interested in comparing motors regarding to torque and what they can deliver, I would recommend reading Philo's excellent motor comparison page which has a lot of detailed information, very much useful for tinkerers. Of course not all of these motors are readily available nowadays and depending on your project some may be less suitable; but there'...


9

The present line of battery boxes all provide 800mA of current and have overload protection to ensure that this level is not exceeded. Here's what the LEGO website has to say about powering motors: As a rule of thumb, you can drive 2 Power Functions XL-Motors, 3 Power Functions Train Motors or 4 Power Functions M-Motors at the same time from one Power ...


8

I'm assuming that you meant "the motor is not powerful enough". Surely you can use a gearing ratio & leverage to assist? Essentially you want the motor to turn many times for each small amount of distance traveled by the lifting arm. This means a small gear on the motor and a large gear driving the lifting. You may need to connect several gears together ...


8

The motor you have linked is indeed quite old and as far as I know, not compatible with anything newer. Seeing that it works with simple DC current, it wouldn't be hard to construct a converter cable, but it is still some work (especially reducing the voltage from 9V to the 4.5V required by this motor). The next generation (9V system: large motor, ...


7

By adding two motors together with gears, you have doubled the torque the motors provide. Power = torque x speed, so if you don't want the doubled power from the motors to go to the torque component but to the speed component instead, I think you should use a differential and put the motors on both outputs of the differential, and use the input to feed your ...


7

The length of the wire is another thing to be aware of. The wire attached to the motor in 8293 is only slightly more than 20 centimeters (might be a few centimeters more, I don't remember), you can double that by putting in the switch which has about the same length of wire, but it's still not much. I don't know how long the wire in 8700 was, but it looks ...


7

Yes, both items contain the same M-Motor part.


7

This is actually a surprisingly difficult task. If you search for similar questions over on the Robotics stack exchange, you will find very smart people who can't even get it right with thousand-dollar localization solutions and graduate-level control theory. If you have a Gyro sensor like Michael suggested, you're on the right track. You can probably get ...


7

That is only 1 stud. So an axle of 5 always stick out 4 studs


6

Undo the 2 screws at the top and then take of the top cover. You can now take the actual motor out of the casing. It just sits loose in there. Then you can undo the 2 screws in the bottom to free the metal block with the plastic gears. It is most likely those gears that cause the squealing because of dust/dirt that got into them. I would recommend to ...


6

Well the power cable is the main difference, as one motor was made for the short-lived 9V RC system while the other is the current PF one. However, that doesn't mean the internals are the same. From Philo 's motor comparison page, you'll see that the PF motor is better, and that fortunately the performances are much improved [over the RC one], with an ...


6

A sensor port can't directly output to a motor. The sensor drivers can't provide enough power to supply a motor. You have a couple options: Daisy-chain two EV3s together. The first can control the sensors and motors of the second. Use an electronic motor multiplexer. EDIT: It should be noted that this requires an external power supply, which will increase ...


6

M Motor (Powered Up/WeDo 2.0) The M motor has a 2.2kΩ resistor between pins 5 and 6. Pin 6 is connected directly to pin 3. LED Lights I don't own any lights yet, but according to this post, they also use a 2.2kΩ resistor, but in this case it is between pins 5 and 3. This pulls ID 1 to ground. Here's the full circuit diagram: Train motor The measured ...


6

The best way would definitely be to appeal to his already existing preferences and show him how LEGO Technic can integrate into that or even enhance that. Does he like cars? Let's build a simple car with him, later add a steering system, and still later a motor for driving. Does he like robots? Offer to build a robot, with gears to move the arms, legs, ...


6

Instead of providing a pile of assorted Technic bricks and motors, I would (and already did) rather start with medium-sized sets. This guarantees success and shows how everything fits together nicely. I am doing this with regular LEGO sets and my children are already demanding larger and larger sets. MOCs (i.e. "My Own Creations") can follow later.


6

Parts are compatible, and the underlying system hasn't change, but Technic has transitioned away from using traditional studs, so you may find it a bit clunky to integrate older components. The biggest difference for motors is electrical compatibility, as noted in another answer. Both the wire connectors and voltages used have changed a few times over the ...


6

There are several such MOCs in existence around the Internet: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-42193/Porlock/fully-rc-lego-technic-doms-dodge-charger-model-42111-with-fast-buggy-motor-lights-and-some-changes/#bi https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-41973/BrickUrDream/dodge-rc-motorized-42111/#bi https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmYalpTxmIs https://racingbrick....


5

This part is called Micro Scout with Dark Gray Base the white version on your photo comes from 9748-1: Droid Developer Kit (pictures via Bricklink)


5

Pulleys and gears With a range of pulleys and gears you can build something capable of lifting as much as 100 kilos with LEGO parts, albeit at the risk of putting enormous amounts of stress on the bricks! Using a small gear to power a larger gear (gearing down), you can greatly improve the torque (rotational force) at the cost of reduced speed. Gear ...


5

According to bricklink, 88003 is the set containing exactly one part, namely the 99499 motor. You can buy the motor as a set in LEGO shops or online, it's packaged in a plastic bag, which probably accounts for the 3 gram weight difference between the items. To my knowledge there are no different versions of the Power Functions L motor. Here is the list of ...


5

I'm just going down this route with my 7 year old. The old style primary colour gears (G9 / G15 / G21) have proved to be better for little fingers and more engaging than the "standard" technic gears, if you can get hold of them in sufficient quantity. Of course, some of the model instructions we've followed have required a little adapting, but that's all ...


5

I don't think it would be practical to evaluate every LEGO motors sound output, almost all LEGO motors are fairly noisy so I think it is best to address the problem of a noisy motor in general. My first suggestion would be to remove the source of the noise first, by using a purely manually operated dolly, if this isn't an option (perhaps you would prefer to ...


5

Given your background and overall goals (using 3rd parties motors currently and hoping to power creations using Arduino or Raspberry Pi), I wouldn't go with the starter kit. For my money, I'd buy an M-motor or two and see if they meet your needs. These are currently $7.49 individually on LEGO.com: https://www.lego.com/en-us/product/lego-power-functions-m-...


4

According to Philo's detailed analysis of the servomotor, it takes its commands from the C lines but needs to be powered as well: Being a Power Functions range member, it is fully integrated with this system, and receives its commended position through C1/C2 lines, and its power from supply lines. On a normal motor, C1/C2 duty cycle directly control motor ...


4

Turns out the problem is that Servo motors need at least THREE wires. Two for the PWM and one for full power. I made a new connector (and I can attach a picture if anyone is interested . . . just don't have one handy right now) that had all four of the wires from the Lego brick connected to breadboarding pins and then I wired the two new wires to +9 and ...


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