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5

Parts are compatible, and the underlying system hasn't change, but Technic has transitioned away from using traditional studs, so you may find it a bit clunky to integrate older components. The biggest difference for motors is electrical compatibility, as noted in another answer. Both the wire connectors and voltages used have changed a few times over the ...


7

The motor you have linked is indeed quite old and as far as I know, not compatible with anything newer. Seeing that it works with simple DC current, it wouldn't be hard to construct a converter cable, but it is still some work (especially reducing the voltage from 9V to the 4.5V required by this motor). The next generation (9V system: large motor, ...


5

Given your background and overall goals (using 3rd parties motors currently and hoping to power creations using Arduino or Raspberry Pi), I wouldn't go with the starter kit. For my money, I'd buy an M-motor or two and see if they meet your needs. These are currently $7.49 individually on LEGO.com: https://www.lego.com/en-us/product/lego-power-functions-m-...


10

If you're interested in comparing motors regarding to torque and what they can deliver, I would recommend reading Philo's excellent motor comparison page which has a lot of detailed information, very much useful for tinkerers. Of course not all of these motors are readily available nowadays and depending on your project some may be less suitable; but there'...


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