12

I designed and built a lego sorting and storage desk for my son late last year. It has 16 bins and 16 corresponding holes in the top. It also has an interior baffle system to keep lego pieces from jumping into incorrect bin. I had to go through several designs to get it to work right, be ergonomic (all drop slots within reach while seated), and make it easy ...


10

Despite what it superficially looks like in (for example) Sariel's build videos, having a big pile of parts spread across the table is not the fastest way. Pour the contents of the smaller bags into containers (I use old plastic take-away containers). That way you are looking through a container of blue 3 long pins and red 2-long axles for a 2-long axle, ...


9

Brick Architect has labels available for printing. These are designed to be used with a label maker, but there are also full page PDFs available that can be cut out. Here's an example of how they look:


8

At my house there are two (well, three) Lego collections. Mine, and my kids'. The rules are stricter for mine: the Lego isn't meant to be thrown around, dropped pieces should be picked up, it isn't to be left on the floor, it doesn't get brought all over the house, and it gets put away every time. The kids' collections they keep in plastic boxes and they ...


8

As you have probably guessed by now, there is no easy solution to your question. It all comes down to computer vision. In this solution, Akiyuki built a massive machine out of LEGO bricks, a camera, a scale, 2 Mindstorm NXT and, which he fails to mention in is parts list, a computer and some electronics. Computer vision is complex, and making a working ...


7

Very specific to your region (and mine): The ALDI chain carries the following hobby sorting drawers from time to time (about once a year): They are very cheap, about 7 Euro for each type and they are VERY popular with AFOLs in Belgium and the Netherlands. Unfortunately it is hard to predict when ALDI offers these and they are often sold out immediately.


6

Here's what I did after finding a couple of old LEGO boxes stashed away in my parents' house. Create a user and log into Rebrickable.com. Under 'My Parts', create a new part list, and start adding your parts using their catalog. They have a very good search engine and you can quickly find most, if not all, of the exact parts. Once done, go to the 'Build' ...


6

All large sets released in the last few years come in numbered bags. The bags are sorted by logical sections as they appear in the instruction manuals. So for example there will be several bags numbered as #1, several bags numbered as #2, etc. The intention is that you open all the bags numbered as #1, build that section, then open the bags numbers as #2, ...


6

Try "Iris storage drawer" on amazon.co.uk. They sell transparent drawers and boxes in several sizes. These (3 large drawers or 6 small drawers) cost about 30 pounds. They are similar to the system that Jangbricks in his LEGO parts tour is showing.


5

Yes. Jacques Mattheij made a pretty awesome machine using some feeders, machine learning, and air blowers to sort out the top 1000 parts by popularity. It looks like he's well on his way to sorting two metric tons of bulk LEGO: https://jacquesmattheij.com/sorting-two-metric-tons-of-lego More discussion on Hacker News, including a bunch of comments by ...


5

I have bought several used sets and it's a mix - sometimes people send the entire set built, sometimes split into larger chunks, and sometimes broken apart into individual pieces. It all depends on the current state of the set (fully assembled, partly assembled) and on the dimensions and availability of the shipping supplies. In the US it is easier to break ...


4

The Brick Manager app might be helpful with sorting the sets. It keeps track of all pieces that you've found and which are still missing. Note: I am the developer of the app, and my post is a genuine attempt to help the topic starter and others facing the same issues. Here's a description of the app from the app page on the Play store: You have a huge ...


4

One way to do this would be to look through the Bricklink categories for minifig torso assemblies and minifig leg assemblies. There are a lot of them, but once you find the part you are looking for, you can then learn what set it came from which should lead you to a couple of complete minifigs (click the part id then click the "View" link under "This Part ...


4

An alternative to using BrickLink for those purposes would be http://rebrickable.com. I personally find the interface to have some warts, but definitely better than BrickLink in a lot of ways. In particular to your requested features it does support importing parts from sets (Look for the "Add to my Parts (Part out set)" link on any set description page) as ...


4

You can use the Compare Sets function on Rebrickable for that (if the B model is an official model or a MOC on Rebrickable). Here an example for both official models from the 42069 set.


4

With “services”, do you mean someone who would come out to your house and rebuild the sets for you? As intriguing as that sounds, I do not believe something like that exists. Your best bet is to grab an instruction manual and start rebuilding from the pieces. Once you have a few sets built this way, it’ll become easier to rebuild the remaining sets. For sets ...


3

Sorting LEGO bricks is more complex than you might think. Frequency of use, shape of the brick, and communication with others are essential features of a good classification. Have a look at this book, it covers the sorting of LEGO bricks extensively: The Ideal Order


3

A lot of people prefer wide, shallow boxes to store parts — because it allows you more surface area to see what's in there. A Dollar store is a great place to get cheap storage containers.


3

The most promising approach that I have seen is being used by LETZGO (http://www.letzgo.co.kr/home) a Korean start-up that aims to make Lego affordable by offering Lego sets on a rental basis. Naturally the rental process makes sets liable to lose/damage pieces and so they appear to have developed an automated process for sorting and to verify the integrity ...


3

We have a small business sorting LEGO for customers (www.brick-sort.com)... and we've tried many different machines. Bottom line is that, unless you're dealing in tens of thousands of parts, Pubby is right: "...the time it takes you to build and use one of these is probably greater than the amount of time it takes to sort by hand." I think people forget ...


3

Our categories are: brick shaped mechanical people people tools finish Then L, M, S within each of these. Brick is any rectangular prism, flat or otherwise. Mechanical are any that can spin or move when connected. Shaped are not mechanical or brick. People tools are anything that fits in a LEGO hand, not otherwise mechanical. Finish are smooth pieces that ...


3

My puny brain can only come up with one method: One Piece At A Time. Check for the LEGO logo somewhere. Sometimes it's hard to find. On the Brick, Round 1 x 1 with Fins it's on the bottom of one of the fins. Seems that most of the time there are minor, yet obvious, mold differences. Some brands, like Kre-O have an indent on one or more studs. I have ...


3

Each Lego set has a parts list by color and shape. If you live close to a Lego store they can provide you with one. Many include the list on the box. I'm not sure if the downloadable schematics for consumers has a parts list. Once you have found the pieces once, bag them separately from your freestyle Legos. Additional Legos for freestyle are available ...


3

Another useful tool is goatleg.com which allows you to select torso and face characteristics to identify a minifigure e.g. torso color and print. Face: glasses, facial hair, lipstick etc.


3

I haven't bought much used Lego. But normally an entire set would be mixed together into one or two ziplock bags. Given that the set is currently assembled, are you sure it has all the parts? Sometimes there are loose parts or figures that don't make it onto the final build. You may want to double-check with the instructions by rebuilding it. Finally, is ...


3

For kids I favour a sheet or cloth circle with drawstring for the bulk of the Lego, then a few ice cream or take-away containers for small parts. There are lots of instructions for these online, including this no-sew version If you have a tennis or badminton racquet handy to use as a sifter that makes it easy to separate out the really small parts that are ...


3

Had an argument with my wife the other day about how to sort. My idea was to do it by colour, but then I realized she was right (obviously) and sorting by type is more practical. Windows and doors go together, thin plates, large plates, wheels, etc. That said, with the kids we never sort a box just opened. As Mr Shiny and New and Bernd Wilke do, we open ...


2

I actually used to play with Legos quite a bit when I was 8-11. (Now I'm middle school). My mom bought me some fishing boxes (like this:http://www.dhresource.com/albu_267111068_00-1.0x0/box-new-plastic-buckle-case-styled-fishing.jpg). Then we would sort all the small pieces like minifigures, weapons, connectors, 2x1s, etc into these each being in its own ...


2

This is really more than one question, and the main one (storage) has answers here. For the second question, the answer is to use Rebrickable.com. You can put your sets into a database and it will tell you what else you can build. You can see inventories for each set and you can see if you have the pieces to build other sets. For your third question, I don'...


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